/ Which sleeping bag?

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Frogger - on 11 Feb 2014
Hiya

Just wondering if anyone can give advice to me about which sleeping bag I should buy. I'm wondering if the Rab Ascent 700 would be good enough for Scottish winter and maybe a bit of summer Alpine stuff. Alternatively, I'm looking at the Rab Ascent 900 - mainly because these seem very good value for what you get.

Any recommendations welcome...

Cheers!

F
crayefish - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to Frogger:

The 700 should be fine (it is lighter)... just sleep in your belay jacket if you're too cold. My 750 fill bag does me good to -20 with a belay jacket and full clothes.

Just be aware that RAB don't put as much down in the underside of their bags to save weight (the down underneath being compressed and not very effective) so they're better if you are someone who doesn't roll off your back in the night. If, like me, you tend to end up on your side at some point in the night, I'd go for someone else like ME who fill their bags more evenly.
SidharthaDongre - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to Frogger:

The ME Snowline is probably a good bet too, though similar spec-wise to the Ascent 900. Both are great bags. There's some pics and a write-up for the Snowline at the following link if you're interested:

http://ruinapartum.wordpress.com/2014/02/04/gear-review-mountain-equipment-snowline-17c/

Also, I believe there's one on Ebay at the moment.
Frogger - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to crayefish:

Thanks, that's useful.

Mostly sleep on my back, unless it's a sleepless night, in which case I'm all over the place!

F
Frogger - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to SidharthaDongre:

That's a good review, thanks for posting

F
SidharthaDongre - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to Frogger:

Thanks, 'tis no problem!
neilwiltshire on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to Frogger:

I have the Rab Ascent 700 and have slept in cold conditions with relative comfort, wearing only underwear.

Trying to estimate the temperature is tricky, I think with wind chill outside the tent it was around -15. It was so cold we decided to go to bed at 6pm just to be inside our tents.

Inside the tent? at a guess maybe -6 or 7.
Frogger - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to neilwiltshire:

I've often wondered what the temperature difference is inside a tent. Must be a few degrees, as you say
Iain Thow - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to Frogger:

I've got an Ascent 900, slept in it over 400 nights, in everything from Summer Alps & Pyrenees to -26 in wintry Scotland. Great bag. Incidentally I'm a restless sleeper but haven't had a problem with different levels of down fill. Have to stick my feet out the bottom in warmer weather but I'm fine with that.
neilwiltshire on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to Frogger:
Depends on windchill of course, if there's no wind the difference may not be all that much. On that particular day though, the wind was ferocious and cold!
Post edited at 15:01
CurlyStevo - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to Frogger:
Do you definitely intend to use it for Scottish Winter? Having camped quite a few times when winter climbing its not something I'd rush back to do again, although it was certainly character building!
Post edited at 15:15
psaunders - on 11 Feb 2014
In reply to Frogger:

I can't say for sure, but can contribute an anecdote with accurately measured temperatures:

Camping in Norway in January, the outside temperature was -18C when we retired. With 3 people in the tent the temperature very quickly (~30 mins) reached -5C 'in the middle', obviously a little colder around the edges. Lesson: having people in a tent makes a huge difference to the air temperature. Having a good mat (or a few) is more important than the sleeping bag.

Also remember it's important to ventilate the tent when it's cold, or you will get a large build up of frost on the inner and your sleeping bags.
Frogger - on 12 Feb 2014
In reply to CurlyStevo:
> (In reply to Frogger) Do you definitely intend to use it for Scottish Winter?



Well my preference would be bunkhouses but I have some keen friends!! ;-)



Frogger - on 12 Feb 2014
In reply to psaunders:
> (In reply to Frogger)
> Having a good mat (or a few) is more important than the sleeping bag.


Thanks, appreciate the tip
CurlyStevo - on 12 Feb 2014
In reply to Frogger:

if its car camping I use an air bed with a foam mat over the top. The foam mat insulates me from the air bed (which can be very cold without it). Its a cost effective but comfortable solution.
berna on 13 Feb 2014
In reply to Frogger:

Depending on how set you are brand and material it may even be worth looking into the mountain hardwear Lamina 0. It is not a down bag so it does not pack as small and is a bit heavier at 1.6kg. However being synthetic helps in that it'll keep you warm even when damp-wet. If you are thinking mostly Scottish winter this becomes relevant as because weather tends to be bad and it is not that high rain becomes more of a factor in how cold you will be.

For the clincher now, it costs significantly less that most down bags rated to the same temperatures. I had bought quite a bit of kit for my last trip and the saving was very welcome. That said I was plenty warm.
CurlyStevo - on 13 Feb 2014
In reply to berna:
I don't know about that bag but I bought a synthetic bag that was light for its warmth by snugpack. I found the temperature range which was comfortable and not too hot /cold to be very narrow and in a few years it lost a lot of warmth compared to down.

ads.ukclimbing.com
berna on 14 Feb 2014
In reply to CurlyStevo:

Good point, I cannot comment on longevity as I've so far used it once (broke an ankle in the same trip I bought it for!). It is however rated to comfort -18C.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.