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Topic - Running in the rain?

hokkyokusei - on 15 Feb 2014
I just can't do it. I look out the window and if it's raining my desire to run evaporates. It's just too damp and the damp leads to cold and aches and suffering. I'm meant to be at the parkrun this morning :(
tistimetogo on 15 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Try running in the snow! That's where it's at!

Or getting a buddy. Harder to bail out if the two of ye have planned it.
goatee - on 15 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

It has become one of my favourite things. Just wear a decent top and you will stay warm enough. Anyway with this weather what choice do we have. Gym...I don't think so.
veteye - on 15 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Go and do it with a changed plan:-to go for a shorter distance just to keep your hand in.Then you may find that you get used to it and go a little longer...
JamButty - on 15 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Its all about getting out the door, once you're 1km ish in to it, I actually enjoy running in the rain.
MTFU! ;-)
SteveRi - on 15 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:
I did an hour in the woods last night and for once it was getting to me. Starting to get a bit tired of the constant slop, drizzle and rain. That said I think I'll be out again later :)
hokkyokusei - on 15 Feb 2014
In reply to tistimetogo:

I have a lunch time running buddy but not weekend, and you're right it does help.
IainRUK - on 15 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Just go. You never regret a run and within a few 100m its fine and you are warm.

I love winter nights, long runs in the rain, under street lights.. its when the gains are made as you know many of your rivals will be taking the night off.. feel all smug. :-)

It's like Christmas day training..
sbrt on 15 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Dont bother, give in, stop in bed.
DreadyCraig - on 15 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

My two local parkruns were cancelled today because the weather had messed up the courses, was nice to stay in bed. Well it was until my 9 month old decided it was time we all got up, so much for the lie in!
Ben Sharp - on 16 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

I seem to find it easier to motivate myself to get out in winter because it's always dark and cold. In the summer you're thinking "hmmm, it's not very nice today, maybe I should leave it till tomorrow" or if it's nice you're thinking "lets have a BBQ and scrap the run". In the winter the weather doesn't even matter, it's usually shit so it's not going to enter your decision making process over whether to go out or not, what else are you going to do, watch TV? Bleurgh. You could always take a self timer photo of yourself sitting in front of the telly in your boxers eating a greasy pizza and every time you don't feel like going for a run get it out the draw and have a peek at what the alternative is?

I like running in the rain anyway though, tramping through the woods, squelching through the mud with the head torch picking every rain drop out. And when it's really pouring you've got it all to yourself, because most people are inside. Maybe if you become anti-social you'll enjoy the rain more? No barking dogs, no screaming kids, no real runners twice your age sailing past you.

I find leaving my running gear sitting out for when I get in/get up helps, once you're getting into your running gear on autopilot then the battle's won and like everyone says once you're out it's fine. Once you get into the habit of just going it makes it easier to just go, once you get into the habit of backing out it makes it easier to back out.
LeeWood - on 16 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:
Agreed - once you get going it's OK. I rarely set out in rain but accept it if it sets in later.

One christmas many years ago I stayed at Buttermere YHA and my only exercise was to run - for the most part on the fell. I carried pertex shell clothing but on one particular occasion I had an uncanny out-of-body experience running in cold driving rain. It seemed my core heat maintained but I lost all 'external' feeling (soaked to the skin). Disconnection. It was like remote piloting. Luckily I avoided cramps and so kept going to maintain core heat. I could never have intended this experience but so valuable & quite unforgetable. Hot shower at the end of a run like this (& I've had plenty others returning mildly hypothermic) are exquisite - there's a compensation :)

Post edited at 10:31
mbh - on 16 Feb 2014
In reply to LeeWood:

>Hot shower at the end of a run like this (& I've had plenty others returning mildly hypothermic) are exquisite - there's a compensation :)

Unless you get the hot aches all over....
Antigua - on 16 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Is it the rain or the rain AND the cold?
hokkyokusei - on 16 Feb 2014
In reply to LeeWood:

I think that's my problem, once I'm out there I'll carry on, but going out - urgh.
hokkyokusei - on 16 Feb 2014
In reply to Antigua:

I don't mind dry cold. When I run in the cold I warm up quite quickly. Somehow that doesn't happen when I'm also wet :/

I did get out today, even though it was cold and a bit windy. Did 15k at the Saltaire Shaker :)
Antigua - on 16 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:
Completely agree with you I can run in the cold I can run in the rain but put the 2 together and it just completely zaps my motivation.

Have found that a decent Gore-Tex Active shell running jacket helps.

BTW well done on the 15k
Post edited at 18:50
nufkin - on 16 Feb 2014
In reply to Ben Sharp:

> I like running in the rain anyway though, tramping through the woods, squelching through the mud with the head torch picking every rain drop out. And when it's really pouring you've got it all to yourself, because most people are inside. Maybe if you become anti-social you'll enjoy the rain more? No barking dogs, no screaming kids, no real runners twice your age sailing past you.

Also the good thing about the rain and the dark is that it makes it seem okay not to be going very fast.
I do find I get very sore nipples once my top gets wetted through and heavy and bounces around, however

> Once you get into the habit of just going it makes it easier to just go, once you get into the habit of backing out it makes it easier to back out.

Yes. I'm really good at backing out
nniff - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

It's known as a '5 and 9' in our cycling club, from the tongue in cheek (mostly) rules of the Velominati. Rule 5 is Harden the F up, and rule 9 is essentially that the weather does not matter. Velominati.com
Sankey - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Run at night, you can't see the rain.
Neil Williams - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

I dislike running in the rain because I need glasses and they get covered in droplets, and I really don't get on with contacts. Were it not for that I doubt I'd care provided I was warm enough.

(I'll tend to "run hot" rather than bordering hypothermia, though, in terms of what I would wear)

Neil
DancingOnRock - on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Bad weather always looks worse when you are inside and looking out at it through a window.
RankAmateur on 17 Feb 2014
In reply to Neil Williams:

I run hot as well, so I'll run in shorts, t-shirt and a thin pair of gloves until I'm too warm, when I take the gloves off. That'll see me down to about -2C on a 5k run. I'll still be sweating buckets at the end though.

I'm able to see well enough without my glasses for that to not be an issue, but my beloved has a Decathlon peaked cap that works well for keeping the rain off her glasses

Blizzard conditions last year did necessitate leggings and long sleeves, and I'd have loved to have had some sort of glasses on just to stop the ice being whipped into my eyeballs, but those are rare conditions.
chris warner - on 26 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Get a dog, and when it gives you 'that look' you know that it's time to get your shorts and trainers on (the muddy set) and go and get wet/dirty. I've been lucky enough to have the dog (and shower) at work which means that I don't get grief from the wife for the state we both come back in!
Sebastian Fontleroy - on 26 Feb 2014
In reply to IainRUK:

Ha ha that Christmas Day training reminded me of Daley Thompson. Winner's mentality.
SteveRi - on 27 Feb 2014
Sing hosannah, it's actually starting to dry out a bit on the hill!


hokkyokusei - on 27 Feb 2014
In reply to DancingOnRock:

True that.

Today was a winner - went out (with running budd,y so backing out not an option) in sunshine, started to rain, the sun came back out but the rain turned to hail.
ClimberEd - on 27 Feb 2014
In reply to hokkyokusei:

Baseball cap is my tip.

Somehow I have no problem with it raining if it's kept off my head (bizarre I know….!)
LeeWood - on 28 Feb 2014
In reply to ClimberEd:

agreed - its a most basic instinct to protect the head ... and goolies ;)
yorkshireman - on 28 Feb 2014
In reply to chris warner:

> Get a dog, and when it gives you 'that look' you know that it's time to get your shorts and trainers on (the muddy set) and go and get wet/dirty.

That's one of the things that motivates me - I've got a border collie, so no long walk every morning is not an option, so I figure if I'm going out in grim weather anyway I might as well coincide it with a run.

On Wednesday it was hooning it down with rain, but windy too - the minute I stepped out the door it became sleet which then turned to thick wet snow during the run. The wind made it difficult to run without it driving into my eyes and it was a thoroughly miserable run but like somebody said, the hot shower at the end of it made it worthwhile - and a happy dog.

Do you have a training plan or do you just run spontaneously? If you know you're dropping behind on your planned mileage it can give you some motivation, or if you've been stacking up more than you need you can sometimes reward yourself with a day in bed.
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hokkyokusei - on 28 Feb 2014
In reply to chris warner:

Am more of a cat person than a dog person. Wonder if I could get a cheetah? ;)
hokkyokusei - on 28 Feb 2014
In reply to nniff:

I'll bear that in mind ;)
hokkyokusei - on 28 Feb 2014
In reply to JamButty:

> Its all about getting out the door, once you're 1km ish in to it, I actually enjoy running in the rain.

It's true that it seems less unpleasant if it starts to rain while out, than if you actually have to go out and start in the rain.

> MTFU! ;-)

There's a clear message coming through here ;)

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