/ Quitting my job - will it make a difference?

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Trevers - on 22 Feb 2014
It's taken me long enough but I've finally identified that I need to move on from my current job and move away from London, both of which are sapping me of energy and esteem. I don't know where to go exactly so I'm going to try and find a job first.

Thing is, as mentioned, working and being in London is doing me no good whatsoever and I'm finding it extremely difficult to go about a job search. Especially when I come to sections about my strengths and what I could offer a company, and can't think of anything positive to say about myself since I'm so burnt out. I feel that quitting my job now, taking some time out to get my head straight, then getting on with it would help.

But I've been told by people (including someone who works in recruitment) that this will reflect badly on me and companies will judge. Which makes it seem like a bit of a catch 22. Does UKC's collective wisdom agree that I will be shooting myself in the foot by quitting?
WJV0912 on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

In my experience, getting a job is so much harder if you're unemployed. I think it does reflect badly and you'll find yourself running out of money sooner than you thought.
IainRUK - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

It depends. I'm now unemployed, well from next week and was for 2 months last year. I just say I went full time on running. Just make something up like that, you went travelling, or wanted to climb a lot..

Tom Last - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

My circumstantial input would be that taking a year out did neither myself nor my girlfriend's employability any harm, since she was re-employed before we got back from New Zealand and it only took me about a fortnight before I found a job. This was pre-recession though, so may have change and purely circumstantial anyway. Assuming you're the age your profile says you are, then we were older than you are now if that makes any difference.

You don't actually have to tell an employer it's to sort your head out do you? Could you not use this time to good effect in terms of your future employability in some way?
stroppygob - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

> But I've been told by people (including someone who works in recruitment) that this will reflect badly on me and companies will judge.


Oh well burn yourself out, have a miserable life, and waste your time then, look to an early break down and loss of your health. Far better that than the possibility "companies will judge".

Priorities man, priorities.

Priority 1) Me and Mine.








Priority 92827563829273) Companies may judge.
Larey - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to IainRUK:

But even that makes you seem like you wouldn't commit 100% to the job they are offering you. What if in 4 months when the weathers good and you want to go climbing? they've lost 4 months of training.

I've been in and out of jobs for the past year or so now, (4 jobs since last January)and i'm finding in interviews i get pushed to answer why I've had several jobs and or why am i out of work at the moment.
Also several applications have asked are there are gaps in your employment, if so why.
Good luck finding a new job and moving somewhere new!!
Mark Westerman - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to IainRUK:

> It depends. I'm now unemployed, well from next week and was for 2 months last year. I just say I went full time on running. Just make something up like that, you went travelling, or wanted to climb a lot..

Iain's spot on here. I'm a contractor and always take off a few months each year. Recruitment agencies are always make a song and dance about taking time off saying employers won't like it.

Generally a load of bollocks. Just say you went travelling.

Cheers
Mark
Trevers - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Mark Westerman:

> Iain's spot on here. I'm a contractor and always take off a few months each year. Recruitment agencies are always make a song and dance about taking time off saying employers won't like it.

> Generally a load of bollocks. Just say you went travelling.

> Cheers

> Mark

I'd like to think you're right. Just have to point out - as a contractor, I'd imagine you're both pretty experienced and in demand. I'm looking to change industry and role, which seems like a different gig entirely.
Dauphin - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

Take a couple of weeks of leave. Recalibrate, reset, reconnect with yourself away from the work environment. Sometimes it feels like a rash action is the only way out. It rarely is. No doubt a winter in the smoke in a job you hate can do this to the strongest of men.

D
IainRUK - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Larey:

I can back mine up with achievements but it goes both ways. Some people think my success in sport is an example of hard work, focus, dedication.. others an example that I don't work hard enough..

They are both right.. :-)

But it can be taken either way.

But I sort of feel like it selects who you work for, do I want to work for people who don't see the value in having a life outside work. Lets face it I'm going to want time off.

I once left Bangor on a Friday night, flew to Slovenia, raced the world mountain running champs for Wales, came back monday morning tanned and got the 'how do you have time, you don't work hard enough'.. yet most lunchtimes I'd run and they'd spend an hour in the coffee room gossiping..
Trevers - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to IainRUK:

> I once left Bangor on a Friday night, flew to Slovenia, raced the world mountain running champs for Wales, came back monday morning tanned and got the 'how do you have time, you don't work hard enough'.. yet most lunchtimes I'd run and they'd spend an hour in the coffee room gossiping..

That's awesome, nice one. It wasn't on Triglav was it?
Enty - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

According to your profile you're 24 - in a very short period of time you'll be 64. If you get to 64 and you've done nowt or seen nowt you'll be very pissed off.
I'm always bewildered how anyone can have input on a climbing website when they live and work in london - I meant that as a joke - sort of ;-)

Like Stroppy said - your priorities are topsy turvey.

E
lardbrain - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

In answer to the original question a) as others have said it may not matter & b) what is your skill set - what do you do currently & what do you want to do?
lardbrain@work
Larey - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to IainRUK:

I agree.
Sounds like personally that was by far the best choice for you and by the sounds of things you've got some great story's because of it!

To be honest i wouldn't have spent the last year any other way and i'm glad i left the jobs i did at the time i did.
annieman - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

I took redundancy in 2005, yes had a bit of a cushion, but had no idea where I was going. It was not until I had moved on that I found out how how messed up I was.

Who does it need to make a difference for? YOU.

What do YOU want to do? Are we here to work to live?

If you are in a happy position you will work better.

Always better to leave a job to be able to move into the next job. but, as others have said, You are more important. If you have the skills to sell or transfer then finding work shouldn't be a problem.

Good luck

Robin
IainRUK - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:
No, lower peaks, I think all less than 2000m.

http://www.gm4o.si/

That was the race.. went for a bike ride the next day, found this hut and had buckwheat fried in pig fat.. the worst meal I've ever eaten...
Trevers - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Enty:

> I'm always bewildered how anyone can have input on a climbing website when they live and work in london - I meant that as a joke - sort of ;-)

Didn't Mick Fowler live and work in London? :P
Frank the Husky - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers: I'm about to hand my notice in after a few years in the ambulance service. I have no plans for getting a new job any time soon. I want to go climbing, running, cycling, reading, drinking tea and hanging out with my friends, my girlfiend and my big ol' dog. I am burnt out and my social life and climbing has suffered massivley as a result of the job I have. No job is worth wrecking your life for.

If you're worried about what people might think when you do get round to making more job applications, you lie. Say one of your parents was very ill, or your sister. You make stuff up that is simple and believable, and which no one will question.

Hand your notice in and get yourself straight and happy.

IainRUK - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

> Didn't Mick Fowler live and work in London? :P

haha, yeah. I was amazed when I met him. I thought he'd be some gnarly guy, hes the most well spoken polite guy. Lovely guy, getting into hi fell running.
Frank the Husky - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to WJV0912:

> In my experience, getting a job is so much harder if you're unemployed. I think it does reflect badly and you'll find yourself running out of money sooner than you thought.

"It reflects badly" is the stuff of 50 years ago when taking time off so you can live a happier, healthier life was almost a crime. I would say it reflects badly on you and your judgement if all you do is work, work, work to please other people, just so they don't think you are somehow less of a person.

Getting a job is so much harder if you are exhausted, burnt out and depressed.
Enty - on 22 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

> Didn't Mick Fowler live and work in London? :P

Exactly, and for every Mick Fowler there's 200 others trying to grab a couple of hours at the Westway.

E
needvert on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

Sounds like you want to quit and leave London... So quit and leave London.

You could be anywhere in the world doing anything for a few weeks or months, if you decide it to be so.

Your current state isn't your end state, its just one of several. If you view your current situation as just temporary, it sort of makes the decision a bit easier. Its not "do I want to get out", but rather "when do I want to get out".

Of course you could stay unhappily in a life you don't really like for the rest of your life, many do.
Frank the Husky - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers: Also, final note on this, you're only 24. Get into good habits now and put yourself first. Quitting a job now (or any time) will absolutely not ruin your life. You can change careers at any point, retrain, drop out, do whatever is best for you.

gribble - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

Absolutely what Mr Husky said. The excuse for a year out is 'family reasons' - needing to look after an ailing relative, a child etc, and that the situation is now resolved and you are keen to get back to work. Difference is you'll be doing it with a clear and happy head. You owe your life to you, not a faceless company.
Franco Cookson on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

Come live in the Moors for 6 months! Moors cures all ailments!
james wardle - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

I have just done exactly the same thing (quitting a London job and moving to the south coast)for the same reasons, and i haven't been happier for years.

Have faith in your ability. I have been bouncing cv around agencies who are all a bit doom and gloom about gaps in work. but the reality is I am getting loads of offers at a better salary than i was on.

I was very worried prior to doing it as i'm 15 years older than you have a mortgage and 2 kids to feed. but its all going really well.

so in short go for it, this job for life thing is so 1950s
RichardP - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

t depends on alot of things.

it maybe felt by prospective employers that you quitting a job before your present were sacking you.

a friend was being pushed out of a job because of politic and he has been struggling for over a year to get another job. My sister was doing work for Brunel University and it was know 4 years ago the project she was working on would come to an end and be made redundant on the 1/11/2012. She is now working for the centre for tropical diseases and I'm sure she's on a good salary.

What field are you in, what sort of work do you want to do?

I'm an electrician and I've spent most of my working life as a sub-contractor. It was known in the trade it's hard to find another job when your working, but if work dries up it's even harder to get another job. It all depends on your contacts and what sort of network you have!

About 2 years ago after struggling I got employed with a company. They give me test equipment, laptop company car etc. So personally I'm staying put until the economy changes or a better offer comes my way, and I don't mean when civil servants say that we are out of recession.

good luck
RichardP - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

> Didn't Mick Fowler live and work in London? :P

erm yes.
He grew up in Wembley and got a job with the Inland Revenue.

when he moved out of London he continued to work for the Tax man

dionhughes - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

Jobs are never as important as your health, and London, in my experience, is a miserable place to live, where no-one talks to each other or in fact smiles.

Take your annual leave, come over for a few weeks to North Wales, find a nice little bedsit/lodgings somewhere near Snowdon, the UKC massif are sure to help you, make connections with UKC climbers, learn a bit of Welsh (if you want to, we are pretty down to earth people), go climbing every day (provided the weather is decent), you need a break from there and experience another world. Then you can decide what's best for you after your break.

I have known quite a few of my friends have settled here after visiting and others that would love to live here but are unable to take the plunge.

(Disclaimer: my opinion maybe wrong and London might be a wonderful place to others)

Dion xx
biped - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

Hi mate you remind me of me at a h age. I had a well paying job which I hated but it took someone out of my usual sphere to open my eyes to the world being much bigger than I perceived. So I got out and did, what for someone of my background, something radically different. No regrets and still one of the best things I've done in terms of making positive decisions about where my own life was going.

One thing that underlined leaving was during the period I was working my notice all my colleagues were saying 'You're mental, you'll never get another job like this,' etc, but on my leaving night they were saying 'Ah I wish I could be like you, just take off and get out of this rut.'

As others have said, you're 24, go and live man! Chase your dreams.
Trevers - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to biped:

> Hi mate you remind me of me at a h age. I had a well paying job which I hated but it took someone out of my usual sphere to open my eyes to the world being much bigger than I perceived. So I got out and did, what for someone of my background, something radically different. No regrets and still one of the best things I've done in terms of making positive decisions about where my own life was going.

Out of curiosity, what job did you move from and to? And did you move locations.

It's not a case of my employer treating me badly, quite the opposite. They've been excellent to me, I just don't belong in the technology industry.

Thanks everyone for the encouragement. I've decided I'm going to give it a month of trying, if I'm still struggling then I'm going to quit after that.
David Kay - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

I'm sort of in the same position as you - 24 and in a teaching job that is stressful and sapping my energy. There are some things I enjoy about the job such as having good lessons with some classes, the holidays and fairly good pay. However, I haven't been in a very good place for the past year or so whilst doing my teacher training and now working in my first job. On the train home I hate the feeling of knowing I will have to work up until bed time. Also, feeling guilty about going away for the weekend as I won't be able to do any planning sucks.

I think about quitting a lot but have no idea about what else I would be good at, if I would be able to find another job etc. The comments on here are encouraging, maybe I do just need to take the 'plunge' and see what happens...

I hope it all works out for the best for you!

David
biped - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:
I worked in electronics, wiring up guidance systems for missiles, often doing 12 hour night shifts 6 days a week on double time. I was into motor racing so the money was useful. Good crack, ok work, the vision of doing this for the rest of my life and listening to guys my age moan about their wives was depressing. I quit as an older friend (who also got me into mountaineering) convinced me of things that none of my teachers or peers did, that I could succeed in so many other things including University and open up wider opportunities more likely lead to those elusive things called happiness and fulfilment that really is all any of us want.

I left and did a mature students course then moved to Glencoe, worked in a pub for a few years and got obsessed by climbing. It wasn't a forever move but not much in life is. The main thing is I grew up a bit, learned a lot, met some very inspiring people and collected a load of experiences that none of my old mates from home who'd stayed in their ruts could ever imagine.

Re you giving it a month of trying, you probably already know if it is working for you or not. It seems to me like you need to get your head round the existence of all the other possibilities out there, even if they are not obvious right now. Opening one door generally results in several others opening for you.

And I'm currently stuck in a toxic job situation and could do with listening to my own advice :o) All the best.
Post edited at 13:19
redsonja - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

I agree with Iain. just say you went travelling etc.
itsThere on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

A good employer will be thinking about if your going to be happy outside of work. This helped me get my first real job.

Most of the agency recruitment people care about getting you into a job becuase they get paid for it.

Stick your CV on monster and go for it.
suilven - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to David Kay:

David, I'm a teacher and I found myself in a position not unlike your own.

The solution for me was to go part-time. I earn a lot less but I've got space for my head now. I still think about a total change but I really can't see anything else I'd be employable for, as teaching is all I've ever really known.

On the plus side for you, I'm 40 - you have time on your side, and your career/life is only just beginning!

I hope you find a way through!
1step2far - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to suilven:

+1 for working part time.

I was in a similar position to the OP. Living in London in a job I hated. I changed role, (same industry) which bought me two more years but I've been happier since leaving London. I now work a 30 hr week and love having a day off to do as I please. I earn less but it's worth it for that extra day's swimming/ climbing! (I do pick up extra work sometimes, if I chose to, but it's on my terms so doesn't stress me so much.)

Eventually I'l change profession as I know it's not for me but for now it pays off the debt I built living in London!

Whatever you do enjoy it!
Duncan Bourne - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

If you really don't like what you are doing and it is impacting on your health then I say quit. Because is quitting a job going to reflect badly on you more than having a nervous breakdown in a job and being forced to quit?

But before you go down that line it is important to identify what it is that is burning you out, long hours, workload, dealing with customers, etc. See if you can't reduce what is stressing you first, rather than chuck everything out
Dr Rorlasaurus - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to David Kay:

I'm another teacher (well, trainee) and the number of times I have almost quit the whole thing because it's "too stressful" and "I have no life" is too many to keep track of. In fact, it took two failed placements, a review meeting and a year out to come back to it, and that's just the training.

I only have 4 weeks left now, and I spent half term doing something risky - I fulfilled a lifetime ambition and went climbing in Rjukan. I have never felt better! I should even be planning now, but I learned that whatever I do will never be good enough so I set myself time-limits on how long I have to plan and resource each lesson. Stopped working two hours ago so I can unpack from holiday, catch up with friends, and read about how there is no point in planning perfect lessons because all the pupils will remember is whether you are a nice person and they like you... noone is going to like you if you don't like yourself!

I am going to work part-time at the end of it, or on supply for a while at least. I can think of nothing worse than working 7 days a week through all waking hours. There is no point in having a job which saps your energy because if you have no time to live, there is no point in being paid well.

Life is too short. Do what makes you happy. Employers will employ people they like, and if they don't like you it's not worth your effort liking them.

I'm not yet employed though so fingers crossed my mentality won't close too many doors....
Bobling - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

Working Holiday visas for Oz/NZ are available till you are 31. Get visa online (cheap and fastish), book flights, chuck job in and never look back. There's a whole word out there go and see it, you can feel miserable when you have a mortgage and kids and no option but to keep plodding on in a job you hate, but if you are young and free from major responsibilities make hay while the sun shines! Life is too short to spend it doing something which makes you miserable.
ads.ukclimbing.com
David Kay - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Dr Rorlasaurus:

You're completely right in that it's way more important to build good relationships with the pupils rather than deliver an all singing all dancing lesson. I need to get back to a good place to do that otherwise I'm doomed until the end of this year (more sleep!!!). Maybe I just need to keep ploughing on and see if it gets better next year. I can't moan too much as I went to Cogne over New Year and had an amazing time ice climbing (guess you got a lot done in Rjukan?). Going part time like you and Suilven have said would be brilliant!

David
IanMcC - on 23 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

My wise friend Jim said this. I believe he's right:"Next month it will be 20 years since I retired from a well paid job to work part time at a lower grade. I never forget a motto that I read at that time -
You sell your hours but you can't buy them back."
Scrump - on 24 Feb 2014
In reply to Trevers:

Quit your job move somewhere good like Sheffield. Lifes to short.

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