/ Alpine trek - Е5, GR5 or The Walkers Haute Route Which one?

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
chaldakov - on 24 Feb 2014

We did last year TMB: http://www.chaldakov.com/far.htm
Now we want to take another route in the Alps...?

1. I am looking for trip around 15 -20 days.

2. Trip possible to make only with tent.

3. I choose between:
3.1. Е5 (Lake Constance to Verona)
3.2. GR5 (Les Houches to Modane)
3.3. The Walkers Haute Route (Chamonix to Zermatt)

One experienced what would you recommend?

Thank you,
Nick Chaldakov
Post edited at 17:32
alansage - on 24 Feb 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Did Modane to Les Houches last summer down GR5/GR55 and had an awesome time. Don't miss the GR55 section through the Vanoise, it was the highlight. No bothers wild camping for most of the way but it's forbidden in the Vanoise apart from next to a couple of the huts. Took us 6 days with full camping gear so you could likely do more in 15-20 days if you wanted to.
chaldakov - on 24 Feb 2014
In reply to alansage:

Along who huts can be stretched tent? Where to find information to plan my route?
Post edited at 17:51
alansage - on 24 Feb 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

We worked from this book:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-GR5-Trail-Through-Cicerone/dp/1852847298/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1393...
We did have a map as well, though you could get away without it.
We camped at Refuge de la Leisse, I forget which of the others allow camping - it's only a couple of the high ones.
chaldakov - on 24 Feb 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

E5 or GR5 or The Walkers Haute Route - Which one is more suitable for tents trek?
Does anyone know a site with GPS Trek (gpx) for The E5 Trans-Alp?
Post edited at 18:27
Simon4 - on 24 Feb 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Don't know about these specific routes, but a friend of mine mostly searches for GPS tracks using :

http://www.gpsies.com/
chaldakov - on 24 Feb 2014
In reply to Simon4:

Thank you:)
altirando - on 24 Feb 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

If you are doing the north end of the GR5, start from Lake Geneva - starting at the Chamonix valley misses out some attractive country.
Cash on 24 Feb 2014
In reply to altirando:

Hi, sorry to hijack this thread! I'm doing the Lake Geneva-Cham section in July....was it doable in approach shoes?
cheers,
Cash
chaldakov - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to Simon4:

Thanks to this site but I have not found a similar route - The E5 Trans-Alp.
alansage - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to cash:

I did a different section, but it was very comfortable in approach shoes - I'd be surprised if LG-Cham were any different.
phil27uk - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to cash:

Hi Cash,

I did this section of the GR5 a number of years ago now and you should have no trouble doing the route in approach shoes. I can't remember anywhere that you would have difficulties, most of the way it is on good paths. It is a lovely walk if you get good weather. Hope you enjoy it.

Phil
Cash on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to phil27uk:

Thanks Phil & Alan
pog100 - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to chaldakov:
We did Lake Geneva to Briancon in about 18 days, all camping except for one night in a hut on the GR55 section, where camping, even overnight bivouacking is banned (though I think this ban is often ignored in the way wild camping happens here). It is a lovely route, all good tracks though a bit rough and small sections of snow even in August. We used the cicerone book, it was very handy. I recommend it and intend to finish it off when we retire!
Post edited at 18:15
chaldakov - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to pog100:

Do you have a list of camp sites along the way?

Thank you:)
due - on 25 Feb 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

I bivied along the stretch from Evian to Chamonix. Each day was roughly up and over a col then down into the next town/village. I don't remember seeing many campsites - but in any case it was easier to have dinner, stock up on food, then set off again until dark.

Some of the descents were killer though, most notably the one into Samoens.
alasdair19 on 26 Feb 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

The gr5 is camp able, though My brother and I and separately My wife used Bivvy bags. Way marking was good usually about 4 days between shops.
phil27uk - on 26 Feb 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Hi,

There was a Gite D'etape in La Chapelle D'Abondance that had a bit of grass you could camp on. For the next stage we wild camped near Lac Vert. In Samoens there was a Camp Site but we opted to stay in a Gite D'etape. We were going to wild camp near to Lac D'Anterne / Col D'Anterne for the views of Mont Blanc but there was a massive lightning storm so we ended up in the refuge. Got to say it was over ten years ago that I did this so the camp sites etc could well have changed.
chaldakov - on 26 Feb 2014
In reply to phil27uk:

Thanks very usable information!
altirando - on 04 Mar 2014
In reply to cash:

Yes, I think I might have been wearing Inov-8 Flyroc when I was there, substantial sole, but Inov-8 Roclite might be better. But of course I was not doing the trek, just days, so I was not carrying a heavy pack. After years of flogging up peaks in such as Koflach plastic shell boots it is a blessed relief to wear lightweight footwear. I would just comment that a pair of poles becomes more essential in maintaining balance, and would be more so with a heavy pack. Earlier in the year you might have met too much snow on the cols though.
ads.ukclimbing.com
altirando - on 05 Mar 2014
In reply to altirando:

Oh, if you have the time, spend two nights in a refuge and nip up the Cornettes de Bise or the Dents d'Oche (bouqetins). And of course don't plunge straight down from the Brevent into Chamonix, contour along the marvellous balcony trail towards Argentiere.
Cash on 05 Mar 2014
In reply to altirando:

All noted, cheers. I'll probably use Haglofs Vertigo. I'm going lightweight all round, 25 litre sac, and using a pole/s as my knees are shot!
Cash on 05 Mar 2014
In reply to altirando:

did the balcony previously when on the TMB so will heed your advice.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.