/ Where is the crux of Vector

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pasbury on 17 Mar 2014
Is it the shenanagins around the ochre slab or getting into the top groove?
jon on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:

Getting on to the ochre slab.
Coel Hellier - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:

Depends on your preferences!

From the pinnacle up to the bottom of the Ochre Slab is the boldest bit; the initial moves up the Oche Slab are likely the technical crux (but ok gear); the moves on the next pitch up the groove are more thuggy and butch and someone could well find them the crux.
Alun - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:

As indicated by others, opinions very. Personally I found the slab really easy, and the upper groove quite tricky.
Bob on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:

Getting on to the Ochre slab is probably the actual crux but the move in the top groove before getting on to the final layback crack feels just as hard if you don't get it right. However this last bit is shared by Diadic http://www.ukclimbing.com/logbook/c.php?i=2496 which is E1 so I suppose that makes getting on to the slab the crux.
jon on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to Bob:
I reckon that move into to the final layback used to be easier before the advent of Friends. If I remember correctly, the undercut that allows you to reach the layaways takes a perfect Friend 1(?) which probably blocks up the best part of it.
Post edited at 11:49
BigHairyIan - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:

Hm, when I did it, I led the ochre slab and my mate backed off the groove above. I led it, and thought that it was as hard as the previous pitch!
John2 - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to Bob:

I remember once having a conversation with Eric about when he used to solo Vector. He said he found the move into the top groove very insecure.
Bob on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to jon:

It's the getting established on the undercut that is both awkward and insecure as it's just out of reach (I'm just under 6'). You can plug in gear in to the slot but makes the move harder. Didn't there used to be a peg in the groove? I think I can remember something there in the early 1980s but there certainly wasn't anything ten years later.
jon on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to John2:

Insecure for soloing certainly. Bit different to leading it though.
AlanLittle - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:
One of the three places already mentioned.

I personally found the move up to gain the base of the Ochre Slab more challenging than the shuffle across it. I've done the groove on the next pitch three times:

- once when I did Nimbus as my first ever E2 and finished up Vector. Found it ok.
- second time when I did Weaver. Found it a bit harder
- third time when I did Vector. Found it perplexingly desperate

... but Diadic finishes up there and is E1, so hmmm
Post edited at 14:35
Robert Durran - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to John2:

> I remember once having a conversation with Eric about when he used to solo Vector. He said he found the move into the top groove very insecure.

I once soloed Weaver (which includes the top groove of Vector, but I didn't seriously contemplate soloing Vector - the ochre slab seemed far too insecure.
johncoxmysteriously - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:

It doesn't really have a crux. Insofar as it does, I'd say it was a sort of polished step on to the Ochre Slab. The top groove seemed what you'd expect; about like one of the harder parts of an E1.

jcm
Martin Hore - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:

I did both Diadic and Vector in the same year but quite a while ago. I think there's something about the direction from which you approach the shared crux that makes the move feel harder on Vector. Difficult to see how that can be, but it's the way I found it, and I've heard others say the same.

However, for me, the Vector crux was the move onto the Ochre Slab

Martin
Coel Hellier - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to Martin Hore:

So obviously the top groove is both the crux section of the E1 and the crux section of the E2!
wilkesley - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to Bob:

> Didn't there used to be a peg in the groove? I think I can remember something there in the early 1980s but there certainly wasn't anything ten years later.

Yes there did, although it was rather battered. However, very useful to clip into and steady the nerves while arranging better pro. ISTR when I have done it placing small wires at this point rather than a friend.
pasbury on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to everyone:

Seems a pretty even split - I found the top groove the crux but I led that and seconded the slab - hence my asking the Q.
I also remember a peg in it I think - would have been early 90's.
I've never seen a more chalked hold than one of the slots on the slab.

John2 - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:

Actually, as someone else pointed out I think the move into the top groove is significantly easier for tall people.
Robert Durran - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to John2:

> Actually, as someone else pointed out I think the move into the top groove is significantly easier for tall people.

That would figure :-)

GridNorth - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:

The move into the top groove developed a reputation because lots of famous good climbers fell off it back in the 60's but this was mainly due to the crack being bunged up with mud and debris. I still find it the hardest move.
ewar woowar on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:
Have done/led Weaver and Vector several times.

Always thought the move into the top groove trickiest.

It's certainly more exposed than the Ochre Slab
Post edited at 21:25
Rick Graham on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to ewar woowar:

> Have done/led Weaver and Vector several times.

> Always thought the move into the top groove trickiest.

> It's certainly more exposed than the Ochre Slab

+1

also find it easier to start the move from Vector side rather than from below when doing Weaver or Diadic.
Goucho on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to pasbury:

Getting onto Ochre Slab IMO, always found the top groove very straightforward - but as other people have said, it's a lot easier if you're tall.
Cardi - on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to Goucho:

Found it hard getting onto the slab. Had a foot pop on the slab. Crimped for King and country to stay on. Loved the groove above. I am 6'2" and generally dislike slabs.
jim jones on 17 Mar 2014
In reply to Bob:

> It's the getting established on the undercut that is both awkward and insecure as it's just out of reach (I'm just under 6'). You can plug in gear in to the slot but makes the move harder.

At only 5'7" in thick socks, every time I've done the Diadic Crack on Vector or the Weaver I can't make the reach or get the gear to do it that way. So I always have to climb direct up the thin cracks and lay off the left arete.

DubyaJamesDubya - on 18 Mar 2014
In reply to Coel Hellier:
> (In reply to pasbury)
>
> Depends on your preferences!
>
> From the pinnacle up to the bottom of the Ochre Slab is the boldest bit; the initial moves up the Oche Slab are likely the technical crux (but ok gear); the moves on the next pitch up the groove are more thuggy and butch and someone could well find them the crux.

A perfect summary.
DubyaJamesDubya - on 18 Mar 2014
In reply to Coel Hellier:
> (In reply to pasbury)
>
> Depends on your preferences!
>
> From the pinnacle up to the bottom of the Ochre Slab is the boldest bit; the initial moves up the Oche Slab are likely the technical crux (but ok gear); the moves on the next pitch up the groove are more thuggy and butch and someone could well find them the crux.

Unless like some I know who find the pull onto the ledge at the top of the first pitch the hardest move (only rated 4c!)

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