/ Waterproof Socks recomendations

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Ricky Martin - on 25 Mar 2014
Having killed a pair of Sealskinz within 50 miles can anyone suggest any alternatives waterproof socks that they have found a bit more durable?

Cheers

Ricky
ow arm - on 25 Mar 2014
In reply to Ricky Martin:

im yet to find any that stay waterproof.
jhb0510 - on 26 Mar 2014
In reply to Ricky Martin:

I found the same with Sealskinz.

I heard that these were quite good:

http://www.chillcheater.com/aqshop/catalogue.php?id=3349&page=

I'm going to give them a go.
neilwiltshire on 26 Mar 2014
In reply to Ricky Martin:

I recommend you don't use waterproof socks. Your feet just get really sweaty and wet. Woolen socks inside waterproof boots/trousers/gaiters is the way forward!
ow arm - on 26 Mar 2014
In reply to jhb0510:

they wont be breathable though so may as well use a plastic bag and save £18
RomTheBear - on 27 Mar 2014
In reply to Ricky Martin:

The sealkinz ones really works well, they really wick all the water out of the sock and keep you feet perfectly dry. Only downside is that they cost a fortune
Ricky Martin - on 27 Mar 2014
In reply to RomTheBear:

No sure you read the post there RomTheBear :-)

Thanks all for the responses,
digby - on 27 Mar 2014
In reply to RomTheBear:

> The sealkinz ones really works well, they really wick all the water out of the sock and keep you feet perfectly dry. Only downside is that they cost a fortune

Are you from a parallel universe? One where Sealskinz socks actually last more than 50 miles? (Actually I think the OP did well to get that far).
SidharthaDongre - on 27 Mar 2014
In reply to digby:
Mine work fine, I've had them for about 2 years and easily done more than 50 miles. I'm not entirely sure what people do with theirs.
Post edited at 15:30
galpinos - on 27 Mar 2014
In reply to SidharthaDongre:
> I'm not entirely sure what people do with theirs.

Run in them? Mime lasted 2 hours (I doubt I'd made 50 miles....). I did get them replaced on warranty so we shall see how they do on the next outing.
SidharthaDongre - on 27 Mar 2014
In reply to galpinos:

I'm sure there are many ways in which they could fail really.

But I guess that it could be that your trainers get wet through, meaning that there would be the converse moisture gradient needed to shift moisture out of the sock, so they may have been wet with sweat. Unless you tested them in the bath/sink?

I use the Trekker model for hiking/backpacking, with a pair of baselayer socks underneath. Even then I only use them after my boots are wet to reduce wear,(3-season), or all-day in winter in my B3's for added insulation.
galpinos - on 27 Mar 2014
In reply to SidharthaDongre:
> I'm sure there are many ways in which they could fail really.
>
> But I guess that it could be that your trainers get wet through, meaning that there would be the converse moisture gradient needed to shift moisture out of the sock, so they may have been wet with sweat. Unless you tested them in the bath/sink?

Yep, did the sink test and the water poured up through the sole where I had obviously worn though the membrane.
SidharthaDongre - on 27 Mar 2014
In reply to galpinos:

Well that'll be that then! ;)
galpinos - on 27 Mar 2014
In reply to SidharthaDongre:

I did get a repalcement pair but they've just sat in the drwawer as I pulled out of the HPM and din't have any races this winter. They'll stay there for now unless it's really snowy for the Highlander.
SidharthaDongre - on 27 Mar 2014
In reply to galpinos:

Yeah, the winter is pretty much my only use for them these days, since I moved to full leather 3-season boots.
digby - on 27 Mar 2014
In reply to galpinos:

> Run in them? Mime lasted 2 hours (I doubt I'd made 50 miles....).

Yes, running. Still, they are lined with merino and sort of act like wetsuits. Quite good in snow, even full of holes.

Someone showed me some Gore ones that have lasted longer running, but I can't remember the name.
Ricky Martin - on 28 Mar 2014
In reply to SidharthaDongre:

> (In reply to galpinos)

> But I guess that it could be that your trainers get wet through, meaning that there would be the converse moisture gradient needed to shift moisture out of the sock, so they may have been wet with sweat. Unless you tested them in the bath/sink?
>

Unfortunately it is a leak. I'd had wet trainers but not feet on the 2 previous days when I have to admit I was quite impressed how well they had worked. But day 3 I crossed a boggy area (not over the top of the socks your honour or even the shoe for that matter) and got definitely wet feet at that point and not over time.

Its since been suggested to me that as the membrane is concertinaed to allow for stretch that if your heavy enough either footed or weight (I am probably both) you can split the membrane under the foot as you "crease the folds" landing on it. Which would be consistent with what I think I’ve experienced.
Post edited at 10:44
LastBoyScout on 28 Mar 2014
In reply to Ricky Martin:

My SealSkinz lasted for years - mainly because they were so uncomfortable and bulky, I never used them!



I did have quite an early version of them, though - they look like they're better shaped now.
galpinos - on 28 Mar 2014
In reply to Ricky Martin:

As an aside, I have some Hi-Vis SealSkinz gloves and they are brilliant for winter running.
fairweatherclimber - on 28 Mar 2014
In reply to Ricky Martin:

I love the Sealskinz (esp thin ones) for winter fell running. They don't last too well but my experience has been better than some posters'.

I find they go at the toes - cutting your nails helps!

More than 20 years ago I had a pair of Gore-Tex socks - i.e. shell material. They worked. If my memory serves me then they had a degree of stretch, but that would put them ahead of the times; maybe mistaken?!
SidharthaDongre - on 28 Mar 2014
In reply to Ricky Martin:

> Its since been suggested to me that as the membrane is concertinaed to allow for stretch that if your heavy enough either footed or weight (I am probably both) you can split the membrane under the foot as you "crease the folds" landing on it. Which would be consistent with what I think Iíve experienced.

Had no idea, but it certainly makes sense. Have you tried getting them replaced?

SethChili - on 28 Mar 2014
In reply to Ricky Martin:

In my experience sealskinz are great as a last line of defence , I reckon they give me about 3 hours extra of dry feet after my boots fill with water . But don't expect to go wading around in fabric boots for hours and still stay dry , they are backup . The real deal is a pair of properly waterproof boots , preferably full grain leather .

Even a top quality jacket is gonna start to feel clammy and damp if you wear it all day in heavy rain several days running . Kit is limited . Learning to embrace damp feet could be the answer to being contented when walking in more boggy bits of the UK .
LastBoyScout on 28 Mar 2014
In reply to SethChili:

> Learning to embrace damp feet could be the answer to being contented when walking in more boggy bits of the UK .

Depends how much you like trench foot...
SethChili - on 28 Mar 2014
In reply to LastBoyScout:

But no one ever died of trench foot .... I think :/
Most people will not be exposed to the 12 hours of constant moisture that is identified as the cause of trench foot .
But .....................I suppose on kinder scout it is distinct possibility

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