/ What do you think of my design for a climbing wall?

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GwilymR - on 05 Apr 2014

I have uploaded 4 images of my climbing wall design to my photo gallery. It has an 80 degree roof, a 40 degree overhang and a couple of vertical walls. The other features are volumes that I plan to make or buy.
What do you think of the basic design? Would you have any other features?
Thanks!

Gwilym

My Gallery: http://www.ukclimbing.com/photos/author.html?id=116335
Post edited at 17:00
moo on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to GwilymR: What's it designed for?

maisie - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to GwilymR:

Probably enough features (!)

It's a good-looking thing - although you're obviously going to be building it in stages. I'd get the roof, overhanging wall and a side wall knocked up first, consolidate on those / fiddle with the bits that didn't work as well as they might, and then worry about the volumes later.

On second thoughts about the features, I'm just about to add some cracks to mine a la Wide Boyz. If you've not watched the (free) vid yet, it's worth it to check out their cellar. Gives you a good idea about the kind of facility you need to do 100 foot roof cracks and E9/10 death routes.

Just get on and nail some boards up!

Martin
Tom Last - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to GwilymR:

What's with the dead space behind the main board, take it you can't use it for whatever reason? Doesn't like like you'll have much space around the stalactite either. Could you use the dead space to open the whole thing out a bit?
GwilymR - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to moo:

It's designed to help me get strong over the summer and during holidays when I'm not at university and don't have easy access to a decent wall.
GwilymR - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to maisie:

Ye that was the idea, to have a small number of faces and then adapt with volumes later. What do you think about the angles? Would you bother trying to make it adjustable?

I have seen Wide Boyz. It was great! Don't think I want a Hastonator on my wall though! Although if I changed my mind I could always put some cracks on with volumes?
moo on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to GwilymR:

You'd do better just sticking to a 45 degree board and 30 degree board with a decent fingerboard set up.

Keep it simple and train smart, quality not quantity.
GwilymR - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to Tom Last:

Unfortunately one of the project requirements is to have a storage space/actual shed in there so that's why there is a dead space at the back.

The position and shape of the stalactite is just an idea I can always move it if it feels to close to the side.
maisie - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to GwilymR:

What's the project? You always get better tailored advice on this kind of stuff if you front up with the whole story in one go.

Martin
Ffion Blethyn - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to maisie:

I think so too ;-)

I was just about to ask the OP if he was going to build this wall or if it was a design project..
GwilymR - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to Ffion Blethyn:

Okay, we have an old shed in our garden and the project is to replace it with a new shed strong enough to contain a decent climbing wall. The shed also needs to contain a storage space hence the dead area.
I am doing a working gap year and at the moment I am learning to use a CAD package. I thought the climbing wall would make a good thing to design while learning the software but I do intend to build it, it's not just a design exercise.
The wall needs to be suitable for power, strength and power endurance training and I would also like it to have some easier vertical sections so that my non climber friends can have a go if they like.
I look to UKC for advice on how best to use a space approximately 18' by 12' by 10' (L, W, H)
Ffion Blethyn - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to GwilymR:

Fair enough! My apologies. I've dabbled with sketchup before, and designed many more things than I've built
LeeWood - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to GwilymR:

Have you put a cost on it? A home wall is a compromise and if costly (in time & money) may make the effort of getting out to a commercial wall (or even real crag) seem more realistic.
maisie - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to GwilymR:

That's a great sized space for a home wall. Now you're talking! That extra bit of headroom will really make a big difference.

You tend to get a lot of questions on here about college projects and surveys...

If you're looking for power and strength, it's simple enough. For endurance, you need to be able to create sustained laps, which essentially means circuits which don't have massive peaks or troughs, no rests and which can flow. So you need more of a 360 arrangement on the vertical, and enough space on the horizontal to isolate moves - which, with a 12 foot width, you've got in spades.

Looks great - you've got the basics (without volumes). If you have 12 feet of width, you could run out two overhanging panels, side by side, one steeper than the other.

It's going to cost a few grand, though - you know that, right ;-)
GwilymR - on 05 Apr 2014
In reply to LeeWood:

I haven't really thought too much about the cost but time definitely won't be an issue. I'll have very long holidays when at uni and I'll have about 8 weeks in the summer before uni starts.
My nearest wall is 10 miles away and isn't great - only about double the size of the one I want to build and mostly vertical, also it only gets reset about once every 3 or 4 months. The nearest decent crag is about an hours drive so that doesn't really work either.
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TonyB - on 06 Apr 2014
In reply to GwilymR:

> The wall needs to be suitable for power, strength and power endurance training and I would also like it to have some easier vertical sections so that my non climber friends can have a go if they like.

What angle do you normally train Power Endurance at? I built my wall primarily with training PE in mind so it's a simple 30 degree wall with virtually no bridging options. It works well for me and I can easily set powerful problems on it.

Obviously everyone has different requirements but with your space, I'd go for 30 and a 45 degree overhangs and ditch the roof. However, if you plan to train for roofs this is pretty essential.

http://www.ukclimbing.com/images/dbpage.html?id=219874


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