/ Access problem at Feizor Nick

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Simon2005 on 11 Apr 2014
Visited Feizor yesterday with a couple of friends. I had just completed my first route when the Farmer appears and demands in a less than polite manner that we leave claiming that he could deny access for a 6 week period during the lambing period (2 weeks to go, according to him). I know that there have been problems here before but given that there were no lambs or sheep and the public and their free roaming dogs were plentiful on the footpath below this sounded a bit over the top to me. As we were unsure of our rights under the CROW act we left and went elsewhere but does the farmer have this right?
climbwhenready - on 11 Apr 2014
In reply to Simon2005:
Short answer is yes, but for 4 weeks: https://www.thebmc.co.uk/crow-restrictions (see also: https://www.thebmc.co.uk/crowact)

However, I would have thought they'd have to put up signs, and restrict to everyone?

(edited to add 4 week bit!)
Post edited at 15:25
Simon2005 on 11 Apr 2014
In reply to climbwhenready:
Cheers for that. I would have expected signs at the beginning of the access route and would have happily complied. I did say to the farmer that there was no notice to this effect but he just accused me of being bolshie. Good to know where I stand though. Had a look at Act and he can restrict access for 6 weeks and not just four.
Post edited at 15:32
deepsoup - on 11 Apr 2014
In reply to climbwhenready:
If the footpath is a public right of way, the restriction wouldn't apply to people on there. (Nor to their dogs, though they are supposed to be "under close control".)
deepsoup - on 11 Apr 2014
In reply to Simon2005:
> Had a look at Act and he can restrict access for 6 weeks and not just four.

Look again - et seems to me that he can restrict access for dogs for 6 weeks, not for people. (And then only if the land in question is a field or enclosure of not more than 15 hectares used for lambing - absolutely no idea if that applies in this case.)
Simon2005 on 11 Apr 2014
In reply to deepsoup:

Thanks for that. I don't know if the 15 hectares is relevant or not but you are right; the 6 week restriction is for dogs so what he was quoting to me was wrong.
Bulls Crack - on 11 Apr 2014
In reply to Simon2005:

There do not appear to be any CROW restrictions in place according to the Natural England website http://www.openaccess.naturalengland.org.uk
but he could apply for a restriction exclude people with dogs from 'lambing' enclosures.

This from the RAD: If challenged by the landowner remain amicable and report the incident to the BMC. There have been incidents involving dogs and livestock, please remember the sheep in this vicinity are the landowners livelihood. Keep your pet under control and on a lead during lambing (March - July) or when livestock are grazing near the crag.

Simon2005 on 11 Apr 2014
In reply to Bulls Crack:
Thanks for that. It's useful to know that I can find out if restrictions are in place in advance, especially when visiting a crag that has a history! I have now notified the BMC of this incident.
Post edited at 19:42
Dave Musgrove - on 11 Apr 2014
In reply to Simon2005:

There is a history of conflict here. The farmer never seemed to accept that this bit of his land was mapped as access land and has turned climbers away at various times of year quoting several different reasons. He has been spoken to by BMC access officers and National Park Rangers several times over the last 10 years but still seems to have an issue with climbers. He does have the right to make short term temporary closures but I believe these should be notified to the Local Access Forum and I understood that clear notices should be placed ( I'll check that and get back to you).

By Coincidence I was at Pot Scar today and on coming down met a group of climbers in the cafe who had been at Feizor all day. They said they had seen a farmer but he hadn't challenged them.

Just as a point of reference did you take your car up below the crag? I know he has complained about that before?

I suggest a useful tactic in future is to call at the cafe on your way up, buy a snack and state your intentions to the ladies in there who are all, I believe, related to the local farmers and know what is going on. They are very good about letting you use the cafe car park for the day if you tell them you are climbing.



ads.ukclimbing.com
Simon2005 on 12 Apr 2014
In reply to Dave Musgrove:

Thanks Dave. I was aware that there had been issues in the past so we made sure we parked as per the guidebook and not by the crag. I have heard good reports about the cakes so I'll call in at the cafe if I go back there sometime in the future.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.