/ Steve House and Scott Johnston-Training for the New Alpinism

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Roberttaylor - on 14 Apr 2014
So, I got my copy of this on Thursday.

Thoughts?

I'm re-reading to make sure I don't miss anything.

R
fergie on 14 Apr 2014
In reply to Roberttaylor:

Got my copy earlier in the week.

For me a 450 page book where each page says "do some training!" would be more appropriate
Ander on 14 Apr 2014
In reply to Roberttaylor:
Positive attributes:
- Fairly standard sport science (and presented as such) ie no gimmicks.
- Very well presented- written clearly, good diagrams, etc.
- Selection of anecdotes maintains interest and reinforces main information

Negatives:
- Aimed at 'elite' or high performance only. Beginners or 'improving punters' who want to use this as a training manual might struggle to apply the information.


All in all, I give it 10/10. If you're already well up on your sport science you might not find anything new, but it does apply sport science to a particular aim that probably isn't directly covered as well anywhere else. If you're a beginner, or a punter, then you're probably better off using something like Conditioning for Outdoor Performance.

Ultimately, it's direct application will only apply to a small number of people- those with high dedication seeking high performance in the mountains, or those who have, say, signed up for an "jagged globe" type expedition and are going all out to achieve that.

But if you're interested in the subject it's a good read.
duncan - on 23 Apr 2014
Mr Fuller on 23 Apr 2014
In reply to Roberttaylor:

I reviewed it here: https://gearandmountains.wordpress.com/2014/04/11/training-for-the-new-alpinism-review/ I'd agree that it's an excellent book but not for beginners nor for people with no interest in sports science.
Littleslip - on 23 Apr 2014
In reply to Roberttaylor:

my copy should be here soon, was expecting today actually. As a bit of a sports science geek it would be interesting to see their take, and how they train.

What I'm hoping to gain from the book is the opinions and methods of training from far more experienced climbers which will help dictate my own training. I think the level of fitness elite climbers have is amazing and something to aim for.

Plus I'm looking forward to the pretty pictures
Ander on 23 Apr 2014
In reply to Littleslip:
> (In reply to Roberttaylor)
>
>
> Plus I'm looking forward to the pretty pictures

I'm sure you'll not be disapointed in this :)
needvert on 23 Apr 2014
In reply to Roberttaylor:

Didn't notice this thread...Bought it yesterday, started reading yesterday :). Not so pretty pictures as it's on the Kindle.
alasdair19 on 23 Apr 2014
In reply to Mr Fuller:

Liked your review. Please avoid the hideous it driven functionality...
Pretty sure your twight quote was right.
A true classic.

Is there much on psychology?

I'll be getting a copy as I now can't rely on doing lots of mountains to get fit.
edinburgh_man on 23 Apr 2014
In reply to Roberttaylor:

Great for stopping my plate from burning the table when eating my dinner.
Mr Fuller on 25 Apr 2014
In reply to alasdair19:

Cheers, though not sure what you mean by the "it driven functionality"...?

Yes, there's a whole chapter on the mind and about risk and it comes to a nice conclusion with the idea that you can't be 'out there' all the time - it's just too hard on you and too dangerous.
ads.ukclimbing.com
alasdair19 on 25 Apr 2014
In reply to Mr Fuller:

The word functionality is horrible. I think it started to be used by IT companies but given my awful spelling and grammar on here I probably shouldn't criticise..

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.