/ 'Brotherhood of the rope'

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GrendeI on 14 Apr 2014

Just came across this apparently American saying for the first time whilst reading an article highlighting the doubt around Steck's Annapurna ascent.

Regardless, I couldn't help but feel my eyes flip whilst rolling into the back of my skull.

Why do the yanks have to add such stigma to conventional practices by making every man and their dog become your bloody brother?

...and yes, this is little more than a rant, skilfully hidden with poor use of big words.
Post edited at 16:03
davidbeynon - on 14 Apr 2014
In reply to GrendeI:

GrendeI knows about the brotherhood. He must be silenced!
Choss on 14 Apr 2014
In reply to davidbeynon:

> GrendeI knows about the brotherhood. He must be silenced!

let them Live. They dont Know the brotherhood are called the Climbers club in this country.
Simon4 - on 14 Apr 2014
In reply to davidbeynon:

> GrendeI knows about the brotherhood. He must be silenced!

Rip his arm off and nail it to the door! That'll show him!
spidermonkey09 - on 14 Apr 2014
In reply to GrendeI:

I also read this and thought it was a load of old bollocks.
mgco3 - on 14 Apr 2014
In reply to GrendeI:

He should have his tongue torn out by the root and buried in the sea at low water or a cable's length from the shore where the tide regularly ebbs and flows twice in 24 hours.

Ooops!! I mistook this for the Freemason thread.
tony on 14 Apr 2014
In reply to GrendeI:

I first came across with respect to Charlie Houston's K2 1953 expedition, when the climbers worked together to try to rescue Art Gilkey who was suffering from a blood clot in the leg. Th rescue was a great act of heroism on the part of the climbers, and in particular on the part of Pete Schoening, who pretty much single-handedly save the lives of all the other climbers with his famous emergency belay when Houston slipped and dragged everyone else down (from memory, but it may have been someone other than Houston).

Feel free to mock, but coming from the pen of Charlie Houston, and as a way of describing the bond between the climbers on that particular expedition, I reckon it carries considerable weight.

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