/ good range of crimp holds for a 45 board

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French Erick - on 29 Apr 2014
As per title,
looking at what people are happy with. 45 is hard, if they're too small you don't use them crimps. If they're too incut I open hand them all (always been an open hander, I can't crimp).
Crimping is a weak grip I need to work.

So what do people use? Anyone used them malc's stonesmith puppies yet? Been put off Core by someone I met recently (he hates the Core sign which he finds intrusive on hold grabbing).

Keen to hear from you (I do not really use ukbouldering, but feel free to direct me to a thread)
Fraser on 29 Apr 2014
In reply to French Erick:

I've used some of the StoneSmith holds at TCA and they're very good. To be objective though, probably not yet enough of them to be able to give a confirmed 100% guarantee that they're ALL excellent!

I actually rate the Core holds too, and have quite a few on my own board. (not a 45 I hasten to add) How small do you want to go down to?
French Erick - on 29 Apr 2014
In reply to Fraser:

reasonable to small on my system board. It needs work. not too incut that I can open-hand them. I have already got some beacons ones. I often manage to openhand- semi crimp- them on the 30.
Was climbing this weekend somewhere and openhanding was not an option!
Difficult to explain really.

What core range did you get?
alooker - on 29 Apr 2014
In reply to French Erick:

What someone else can open hand easily you won't be able to and vice versa though surely?
French Erick - on 29 Apr 2014
In reply to alooker:

I want to work for those no option times, so need no option holds if that makes sense.
alooker - on 29 Apr 2014
In reply to French Erick:

Not sure I understand what you mean. If a hold forces YOU to crimp it might not force someone else to crimp. Plus as you inevitably get stronger you'll find that you can openhand things you were forced to crimp before I think.

Good luck, I think you might just have to practice consciously crimping though rather than buying holds that force you to crimp.

Sorry if I've missed the point or misunderstood you!
Mick Ward - on 29 Apr 2014
In reply to French Erick:

[Caveat: I may also be missing the point or misunderstanding you!]

If you're more suited to open-handing than crimping, then I (and loads of others?) envy you. When you go the other way, i.e. from crimping to open-handing - principally to avoid injury - it feels as though your open-hand strength is only about 40% of your crimp strength. Most depressing! If you stick at it, it seems as though open-hand strength comes up to about 85% of crimp strength. (Just my intuition; would be good to test it scientifically). And that's good - but God, it's an effort getting there. If you're already there, well OK, I accept there's the odd route where crimping is essential at the grade but why not just forget such routes and carry on open-handing?

Re holds, when I lived in Sheffield, I used to train on a 45% board with loads of wooden holds. I could get into position, crimp and pull on, say, a first knuckle hold, then go to a slightly smaller one nearby (keeping much the same body position), then go to an even smaller one (carefully, in time). I found this progression really helped. I'd end up using holds I'd never have contemplated in the beginning. And it translated very well to crimpy Peak limestone.

Maybe have a think about open-handing and progression with a wide range of small wooden holds? Just some thoughts...

Mick
French Erick - on 29 Apr 2014
In reply to Mick Ward:

I think the general assumption is that "crimping is the starting point". I see why people are confused now. I have never been able to crimp. I open-hand everything. Sometimes it is not possible to open-hand due to position, size...

I want to work on my crimping so that I can develop say 70% of my open-hand strenght. At the moment it feels more like 30%!

It is just one facet of my climbing skills. The other was pinching and I found the holds for that (some bought, some I made in wood).

What I am after is "I bought those holds and put them up on my 45...they're great and it feels-although it's painful and you must be careful- like I can cranck more on those crimpy routes than before"
Kevin Woods - on 29 Apr 2014
In reply to French Erick:

Or if it's a straight strength issue and you're getting no crimping through your normal climbing, maybe use a fingerboard to bring it up in a structured, controlled way?

My personal experience with this, is open handed is my main grip, and the crimp comes out when an extra slice of juice would benefit the situation. So the crimp gets pulled out maybe 15/20% of the time, depending on rock type.
alooker - on 29 Apr 2014
In reply to French Erick:

Are you saying that your open hand strength is greater than your crimp strength?
Mick Ward - on 29 Apr 2014
In reply to French Erick:

I'll be surprised if you find 'magic crimp holds'. If I were you (and I'm not) I'd replicate my old Sheff situation with lots of small wooden finger-holds, from, say, above one knuckle width to fingernail width. Then you can crimp away to your heart's content, going from bigger to smaller.

Most of us will always be able to crimp on smaller holds than we can open-hand. Though you may be different.

If you've improved on pinching, you'll probably find improving on crimping a doddle. Some years back, a mate, who'd just done his first F8a+ couldn't do the second ascent of a F7a/7a+ I'd just done. The crux was a pure pinch on a big - but very rounded - boss. He just thought it amusing; one of those things. He still was - and is - ten times better than me.

Mick
luke obrien - on 29 Apr 2014
In reply to French Erick:

I've bought tonnes of holds over the years from lots of different manufacturers as I've got 6 ply boards at different angles in my garage. To be honest they have all been as good as each other. Strangely some from decathlon were some of the best I got. Core ones were pretty good apart from some sloper jugs which were pants, I put it down to manufacturer error. If they had more in stock, the beast maker wooden ones have been good but they usually seem sold out. I'd recommend buying a few sets from a range of suppliers and you will get a range of textures and styles. Also consider screw on holds, even footholds if you want really Crimpy stuff.
French Erick - on 30 Apr 2014
In reply to alooker:

without the shadow of a doubt. I cannot crimp to save my life!
alooker - on 30 Apr 2014
In reply to French Erick:

Well I'm going to bow out of this one then as I'm not sure I understand how that's possible!
Fraser on 30 Apr 2014
In reply to French Erick:

> Difficult to explain really.

> What core range did you get?

I didn't get an official 'range' as such, but it was more of a couple of separate orders pulled together from some ex-demo holds they'd used at exhibitions and comps when they were starting out. I do rate them but was on some more StoneSmith ones last night and I like them a lot. Their holds are slightly more unusual and have a more random form so probably more like real rock in terms of shape. If it's simple, flat crimps you're after though, I'd echo the suggestion of home-made timber ones. They're super easy to knock up and more skin friendly whichi is important when training as you don't want to have to stop because of skin issues. I made some for my own board and they're ideal and also are easy to re-profile if / when required.

French Erick - on 10 May 2014
In reply to Fraser:

Got some holds from Stonesmithholds: http://stonesmithholds.com/
Nice shaped crimps, comfy but challenging!
Got some slopers too, and I am a long way off to use them on anything but 5 degree!
Service was very good and prompt. And it is very affordable.

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