/ High wind resistant tent up to 1 kg...?

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chaldakov - on 11 May 2014
Hello colleagues,

I want to buy high wind resistant tent up to 1 kg.
Which tent would you recommend?

Now I have MSR NOOK - 1.6 kg for 2 person.
I like more light tent up to 1 kg.

Nick
www.chaldakov.com
travel and photography
Jack B on 11 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

I have a terra nova laser competition 1. It's good, and it's under 1Kg - packed weight is 970g. Sometimes adverted as lighter (910 or even 870 somehow) but mine is 970g, including the black pole cover. The cover is needed to make it fully waterproof, and provides two extra guy points which are essential in strong wind.

I've had mine out in strongish winds on the cairngorm plateaux. It's always hard to guess how strong, but 30mph at least, probably 40mph. It flapped about a lot, but it stood. The provided pegs are OK in good ground, if you're expecting wind you can place them carefully and put a rock on top in such a way that it keeps the peg down but doesn't chafe the guy too much. In snow or sand, you might need larger (and heavier) pegs.

Ventilation is generally OK, by removing a peg and lifting the edge of the outer, you can get a decent airflow through end to end. It is waterproof if pitched well, but poor pitching (due to uneven ground) and wind can combine to get the inner touching the outer, then water comes through. It's not trivial to pitch well, it takes a bit of practice to get everything adjusted so it's taut.

All in all, it's missing some of the comforts of a bigger tent, but I reckon it's pretty good for a 1-man lightweight tent. Shop about, I got mine for much less than the £330 advertised on the Terra Nova website.
Aly - on 11 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Sub 1kg tents aren't exactly designed for maximum wind resistance but I was incredibly impressed with my Terra Nova photon (very similar to the laser) at this years OMM where I expected an 800g tent to be blown away! I think the key is investing in a few larger pegs for key points rather than using the 'toothpicks' that come with really light tents. A decent selection of cord would be useful too for tying it to things, or to allow you to use rocks instead of pegs.
Kai - on 11 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Here's one:

Don't know if Brooks Range has a distributor in the U.K., however.

http://brooks-range.com/Propel-Tent.html

Jack B on 11 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

I had a look at your website, my Bulgarian isn't good enough to work out where you are planning to go with the tent. Different places call for different tents. The one I suggested above is a double skin, with good ventilation, very important for the cool and damp environment of Scotland. Kai's suggestion is single skin, it will be either lighter or stronger as a result. It is more likely to have condensation problems in Scotland, but might be a better choice for arid lands.
chaldakov - on 11 May 2014
In reply to Jack B:

> I had a look at your website, my Bulgarian isn't good enough to work out where you are planning to go with the tent. Different places call for different tents.

I intend to go to the Alps around Mont Blanc in July and willl be just a tent. As in campsites and wild Camping.
chaldakov - on 11 May 2014
In reply to Kai:

> Here's one:
> Don't know if Brooks Range has a distributor in the U.K., however.
> http://brooks-range.com/Propel-Tent.html

Thanks! But probably condens will be a problem?
Timmd on 11 May 2014
Timmd on 11 May 2014
Timmd on 11 May 2014
chaldakov - on 12 May 2014
In reply to Timmd:


This is very unreliable.
But this http://www.golite.ch/pi/en/Imogene-UL2-Tent-948.html interested me. Someone had experience with this model?
Jack B on 12 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Not that model in particular, but I have used a VauDe Hoagan Ultralight, which is a similar size, price and design but a bit heavier and probably much stronger. It got smashed up in a strong wind. To be fair, it was a very strong wind, and VauDe were great at sending out spares. But I don't think that design in general is a particularly good one for strong winds, and the golite will be much weaker than the VauDe. It does give a lot of space inside for the weight though.
chaldakov - on 12 May 2014
In reply to Jack B:

> Not that model in particular, but I have used a VauDe Hoagan Ultralight, which is a similar size, price and design but a bit heavier and probably much stronger. It got smashed up in a strong wind. To be fair, it was a very strong wind, and VauDe were great at sending out spares. But I don't think that design in general is a particularly good one for strong winds, and the golite will be much weaker than the VauDe. It does give a lot of space inside for the weight though.

Good comment. Helps a lot.

But really design of VauDe Hoagan Ultralight is not windproof.

I find the design of Golite Imogene UL2 http://www.golite.ch/pi/en/Imogene-UL2-Tent-948.html a bit better because of transverse rake back. Although it is lower than that of MSP Nook: http://www.cascadedesigns.com/en/msr/tents/experience-series/nook/product (I have it)
Spike - on 12 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

there were a couple of recommendations earlier for the terra nova laser tents. I strongly advise against the Terra Nova Laser Large - which is a 2 person tent with a porch.

It failed the first night out in strongish winds where we were tucked away by a tarn under Coniston Old Man. The tent bowed in a few times and then a pole snapped and went straight through the fly sheet. The pegs were useless and we had put them in and weighted them with large stones.

We discussed this with the Terra Nova distributors who wouldn't agree to replace the pole nor do a free repair on the hole through the fly sheet. They offered to repair and replace stuff but at our cost, I wasn't happy but perhaps I had expected too much from the Terra Nova brand.

I also have a Terra Nova laser tent which just about fits 2 people, it's ok for low level mountain marathon type camps but I wouldn't use it in true mountain conditions. Lightweight and strength is a balancing act and I think the really LW Terra Nova tents fall down easily on the strength aspect in poor conditions.

Hope this adds a little to your thinking.
S
chaldakov - on 12 May 2014
In reply to Spike:
> there were a couple of recommendations earlier for the terra nova laser tents. I strongly advise against the Terra Nova Laser Large - which is a 2 person tent with a porch.

I agree with you. I've read similar posts about Terra Nova Solar Competition.

Look here these wind tests on Terra Nova Laser Competition, Vould the Power Lizard, Terra Nova Solar Competition 2 at 50+ mph... http://terrybnd.blogspot.com/2011/11/wild-camping-tents-storms.html and make your comment...
Post edited at 20:14
sebflynn - on 13 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Get a tarp, tarps can be very highly wind resistant when pitched in storm mode i know man alpine climbers use tarps (steve house,Mark Twight, Barry Blanchard) so hey can definitely handle some serious winds i recommend the mountain laurel designs super tarp (square).
ben b - on 13 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

I think you are asking for the impossible currently - IMO a really strong, light, cheap, condensation free fully enclosed tent doesn't yet exist in that weight range.

However, if you really are after wind resistance then the Stephenson's Warmlites have excellent reputations and a very low weight. The 2C being the smallest / lightest / strongest, IIRC.

b
chaldakov - on 13 May 2014
In reply to sebflynn:

> Get a tarp, tarps can be very highly wind resistant when pitched in storm mode i know man alpine climbers use tarps (steve house,Mark Twight, Barry Blanchard) so hey can definitely handle some serious winds i recommend the mountain laurel designs super tarp (square).

Thank you for advice. But these tents is monolayer. There will probably condensation?
chaldakov - on 13 May 2014
In reply to ben b:
> I think you are asking for the impossible currently - IMO a really strong, light, cheap, condensation free fully enclosed tent doesn't yet exist in that weight range.

> However, if you really are after wind resistance then the Stephenson's Warmlites have excellent reputations and a very low weight. The 2C being the smallest / lightest / strongest, IIRC.

> b

Thank you:) Very interesting tents!!! Warmlite Climbers Two Person Tent http://warmlite.com/warmlite-climbers-two-person-tent
Probably very windproof. But with a single layer. Are there a lot of condensation? Does anyone have any experience with them?
Post edited at 07:36
ben b - on 13 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Much discussion on the internet. They have been around for a long, long time in an essentially unchanged form. There is a double wall model that reduces condensation but the double walls are side walls only. The ends are still single wall and where your warm, humid mouth is so normal people still expect some condensation on the ends.

The inner runs all the way to the ends of the tent so there is no covered porch - you step straight in or out of the bathtub floor. If you are in muddy conditions this means leaving muddy boots outside, or having muddy boots in the 'main' tent. This is less of an issue in snowy/cold/alpine conditions as you will be wearing boots or have them in the sleeping bag, but there is still the question of brushing off snowy clothing before getting into the tent (tricky in a blizzard).

How much of this is a theoretical rather than practical issue I don't know - I don't have a warmlite although I have always been very tempted by them, especially the 2CR...

Good luck!

b
Simon Caldwell - on 13 May 2014
In reply to Spike:

> I strongly advise against the Terra Nova Laser Large

Really? If it hadn't been discontinued a couple of years ago then I'd have recommended it. Ours even survived a night on the infamous 2008 Borrowdale OMM with nothing worse than a bent pole.

Anyway, this would be my current recommendation
http://www.nordisk.eu/bred/products/tents/tents-detail/type/tents/categories/telemark-2/product_mode...

Ignore (or better still don't even watch) the wind test video, it's highly misleading.

Caveat, I've only used it once so far, and got wet due to peg problems - now resolved.
chaldakov - on 13 May 2014
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

> Ignore (or better still don't even watch) the wind test video, it's highly misleading.

> C

Why wind tests are misleading?

Thank you
Nick
chaldakov - on 14 May 2014

Golite Imogene UL2 - 1.2 kg.
http://www.golite.ch/shop/USER_ARTIKEL_HANDLING_AUFRUF.php?Kategorie_ID=29&Ziel_ID=948

Does anyone have any experience with these tents?

Clint86 - on 14 May 2014
In reply to Spike:

I've had the same with Terra Nova Quasar. Heavier tent, but poles snapping even in calm conditions. They refuse to relace them even at cost price. I've probably had about 12 break in my time. I've switched to Hilleberg and so far so good.
chaldakov - on 15 May 2014
Golite Imogene UL2 - 1.2 kg.

For now I have not found a better tent. Does anyone have another suggestion? I am keep searching...
ben b - on 15 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Have a look (or indeed an ask) on outdoorsmagic.com too - I know there are a few Stephenson's owners there as well.

b
chaldakov - on 15 May 2014
New proposal: Foray 2P Tent - 1.4 kg

http://brooks-range.com/Foray-Tent.html

Full coverage fly

2lb 9oz min weight
3lb 2oz max weight
Pack size 18" x 6"
Fully seam taped
Fly vents to help remove condensation
No Drip Front door, rain won’t drop into the tent when the fly is open
Quick release fly connections
Full mesh canopy for added ventilation
15d Sil / PU Nylon fly 1200mm
15d Sil / Pu Nylon floor 1200mm
90” x 50” x 39”
30 Sq ft
6 sq ft vestibul
ben b - on 15 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Ive seen a head to head somewhere between this, the MHW version that is almost identical, a big agnes one and something else. Will try and dig out a link.

I still stand by what I said earlier though - as yet technology isn't up to all your requirements....

B
ben b - on 15 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Yep look at outdoorgearlab.com

B
chaldakov - on 15 May 2014
If you lower the criteria 2000 m altitude, 50 km / h winds and rain 12 h. Which tent is still better?
ads.ukclimbing.com
TMM - on 15 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

https://www.tarptent.com/

Have you looked at Henry Shires range of tents and tarps. The Scarp with the addition of the crossing poles might meet your criteria.
Steve Perry - on 15 May 2014
In reply to Spike:

> I also have a Terra Nova laser tent which just about fits 2 people, it's ok for low level mountain marathon type camps but I wouldn't use it in true mountain conditions. Lightweight and strength is a balancing act and I think the really LW Terra Nova tents fall down easily on the strength aspect in poor conditions.

I spent a winter out in the Scottish mountains in a Terra Nova Laserlite (stripped down version of your laser) and it never let me down, I still use it now and have lent it out to friends too on occasions. Pegged out proper and pre-tensioned plenty it was always fine even in high windy camps which I did quite a lot of, Its still in great nick now after 8 yes of use.
lone - on 15 May 2014
In reply to chaldakov:

Hi

If you can get your hands on one, then the Gelert Solo is a good one, cost me £15 when I got it a few years ago, there are plenty floating about on Ebay.

Did a night up on Penyfan in it, it was a windy night and it faired well, it is a bit tight but good fun.

Jason
Spike - on 15 May 2014
In reply to Steve Perry:

My TN Laser hasn't let me down either but my confidence in TN was shaken by the very poor performance of the Laser Large (noting this is a different design to the Laser by quite a margin) and then again by the poor response from the TN company.

My view of, and confidence in, the Laser will inevitably be coloured by that experience. However even saying that - look at the blog link on the Laser performance - posted by the OP but about 8-10 posts from the top.
Gav M - on 15 May 2014
In reply to lone:


> If you can get your hands on one, then the Gelert Solo is a good one,

I can give a Gelert Solo to anyone willing to pay the postage. You will have to buy a replacement pole, because it is such a shit tent that it broke after two windless nights.

It might only be 15 quid but it is not 15 quid well spent.

More generally, sub kilo and kiloi-sh tents almost always have thin poles which will not stand up to very bad weather. I have a Terra Nova Solar that is great for what it is but I wouldn't rely on it in really stormy conditions.
Morgan Woods - on 15 May 2014
ben b - on 16 May 2014
In reply to Morgan Woods:

Single skin for 12hrs of rain? That would be fun ;-

b

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