/ Skiing breakable crust over fluff

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MG - on 12 May 2014
How? Are there any alternatives to a) Insanely energetic jumps at worrying speed and b) kick turn traverse, repeat?
HeMa on 12 May 2014
In reply to MG:

Option C, F-turn...

Or perhaps more commonly know as faceplant-turn.
MG - on 12 May 2014
In reply to HeMa:

> Option C, F-turn...

> Or perhaps more commonly know as faceplant-turn.

Ah, yes. Tried those too :-)
HeMa on 12 May 2014
In reply to MG:

In all honestly, quite straight fat skis with tip rocker help (straight as in look for turn radii of over 25m, preferably 35+). Reverse side-cut (old Armada ARG, pRaxi Pow and DP Lotus 138) skis also work like a charm, but they might not be optimal on harder snow...
John W - on 12 May 2014
In reply to MG:

Known as Bruchharsch in German, and many other less polite Anglo-Saxon terms by me! If you can read German, there are some good technique guides on the web, but even good off-piste skiers struggle. Having big fat skis cetainly helps, but as far as I can see, once you break through the crust you are in for a hard time :-(

JW
MG - on 12 May 2014
In reply to John W:

but even good off-piste skiers struggle.

It was slightly encouraging to see on the particular run I am thinking of about 10 other obviously much more competent skiers looking like drunkards on stilts too!
alasdair19 on 12 May 2014
In reply to MG:

Weirdly, long radius telemark turns can work as u can kinda force yourself thru the crust far from 100% reliable though!
Terry James Walker - on 12 May 2014
In reply to MG:
Try not to build up any impulses of pressure throughout the turn, so try and turn evenly (no sudden twist or push of the skis) and smoothly, with very slow up/down movements.
Being super patient with the turn shape (skiing bigger turns) will also help to spread the pressure.
Treat it like skiing on eggshells trying not to break any.
It's super tricky and requires a serious focus and 'tuning in' to what's going on under your feet.

Alternatively, in certain conditions, I ski really proactivley and very aggressively, just driving the skis through the crust. You need to go reasonably fast.
ClimberEd - on 13 May 2014
In reply to MG:

Smooth and strong if that makes any sense.
Stay balanced without weighting one ski heavily or making an jerky movements.
HeMa on 13 May 2014
In reply to ClimberEd:

> Smooth and strong if that makes any sense.

> Stay balanced without weighting one ski heavily or making an jerky movements.

Not really breakable crust though, if you can ski on it without it breakin'...
Doug on 13 May 2014
In reply to HeMa:

Somewhere in the attic I have a book by Arnold Lunn (published 1930s ?) in which he describes a type of snow as 'telemark crust' - just possible to stay on the surface with gentle telemark turns but not with alpine turns when the weighting tends to be less equal.
ClimberEd - on 13 May 2014
In reply to HeMa:

I wasn't implying you wouldn't break through, by staying strong you don't allow you skis to be tracked off course
Rob Exile Ward on 15 May 2014
In reply to MG:

Catch the bus?
kean - on 24 May 2014
In reply to MG:

Take several little steps through the turn, cross-country-ski style. Can work quite well if terrain isn't too steep.
kevin stephens - on 24 May 2014
In reply to kean:

Learn to read the snow in front of you and recognise when the crust may be thick enough to turn and were to go straight over the thinner stuff, apparently if the surface has features like ripples it will often be stronger. This is quite new to me but I was impressed and it seemed to work when a guide explained it to me last season. Having very fat tips on my Preachers seemed to help too
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moffatross on 24 May 2014
In reply to MG:

> How? Are there any alternatives to a) Insanely energetic jumps at worrying speed and b) kick turn traverse, repeat?

Although catching the bus is a more attractive proposition, weighing up the balance of practical alternatives on the day (antigravity or some other god-like skiing technique) and actually being there, in the middle of nowhere facing a refrozen rain-soaked crust on top of a deep bed of moist, grabby, semi powder and then considering just how badly it could end if I break myself on the way down, I'd always opt for (b).

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