/ Sticky tape or plasters for first aid kit

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BusyLizzie on 27 May 2014
Is there any sticky tape or plasters that really stay on? I had a cut on my thumb yesterday before I started climbing (just clumsy; anyone who has spent time with me in a kitchen will understand this) and spent the day renewing an increasingly messy combination of climbing tape and plasters (cheap supermarket brand). There must be something that will stay in place - is there?
L
mbh - on 27 May 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:

I'd like to know this too. If you have ever had nipple rash, and had strategically placed plasters fall off minutes into a long run, you will know that this is an important matter.

On the other hand, and this may only apply to the hairy among us, it would be good if they could stay on AND be pulled off without unnecessary pain.
gd303uk - on 27 May 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:

i use finger tape for the odd cut i get outside,
but medical glue might be a good option.

Medical Glue
2-octyl cyanoacrylate (Derma+flex® QS™, SurgiSeal, FloraSeal and Dermabond) causes less skin irritation and increased flexibility and strength compared to traditional 'Super Glue'. In 1998 the US FDA approved 2-octyl cyanoacrylate for the closure of wounds and surgical incision and in 2001 was approved as "barrier against common bacterial microbes including certain staphylococci, pseudomonads, and Escherichia coli".

n-butyl cyanoacrylate wound adhesives are available under the trade names: LiquiBand®, Histoacryl, Indermil, GluStitch, GluShield, and Periacryl (dental adhesive)

Octyl ester, while providing a weaker bond, are more flexible. Butyl esters provide stronger bond, but are rigid.


A cheaper alternative...Veterinary Glues
If you are looking for something for your personal first aid kit and don't fancy spending £120 on 6 x 5ml vials of Derma Bond, veterinary glues are commercially available as a happy compromise; not licensed for use on humans but essentially the same stuff in a different wrapper.

2-octyl cyanoacrylate Surgi-Lock and Nexaband
n-butyl cyanoacrylate VetGlu, Vetbond and LiquiVet
Ridge - on 27 May 2014
In reply to gd303uk:

Or nip to B&Q.
Wild Isle - on 27 May 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:
In BC wilderness first aid Friars' Balsam - tincture of Benzoin is an essential addition to a first aid kit. Applied with a Q-tip and allowed to go tacky before tape is applied tape then adheres exceptionally well to skin but remains easily removable. Vital for blister management on long backcountry treks, deep/small wound closures (to anchor Steri-strips) etc... A small (10ml) plastic vial is plenty but take care to prevent leaks - this stuff is smelly and sticky!
Post edited at 16:09
Firestarter on 27 May 2014
In reply to Wild Isle:

Zinc oxide tape, or a gauze pad with duck tape
stp - on 27 May 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:

Sticking on zinc oxide tape with super glue usually works pretty well. You can also use thin strips that kind of plat over each other working towards the tip of the finger so that they don't get pulled off when hanging on small holds.

If a cut is sore (like a split tip for instance) apply some oil of cloves first. This can really sting for a couple of seconds but after the pain is gone (its a natural anaesthetic) and you can climb pain free.
ark05 - on 27 May 2014
not sure what you are doing wrong, but climbing tape seems to stay on fine for me.
Turdus torquatus on 27 May 2014
In reply to mbh:

> I'd like to know this too. If you have ever had nipple rash, and had strategically placed plasters fall off minutes into a long run, you will know that this is an important matter.

> On the other hand, and this may only apply to the hairy among us, it would be good if they could stay on AND be pulled off without unnecessary pain.

Elastoplast fabric strapping, cut into small pieces of personalised dimensions won't fall off. Won't take many hairs as long as you keep it small. I think it's meant for securing bandages rather than nipples but it's done me no harm so far.
Tim Chappell - on 27 May 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:

> (just clumsy; anyone who has spent time with me in a kitchen will understand this)


{Cough cough Vanessa's kitchen cough whipped cream cough cough}
Jim C - on 27 May 2014
In reply to Firestarter:

> Zinc oxide tape, or a gauze pad with duck tape

Just a standard plaster supplemented with duct tape is my preference.
buxtoncoffeelover - on 27 May 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:

Hi Lizzie, I use Opsite spray- plastic skin in a can. Excellent for grazes & abrasions caused by grit. Derma-bond, as used in casualty depts, is better for deeper cuts. Aldi (in Buxton) is selling spray-on plastic skin in a small can for £4. Nik
Cameron94 on 27 May 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:

Finger tape works for me, if it's bleeding enough that it won't stick then I ram the cut with chalk first which seems to do the trick.
gd303uk - on 27 May 2014
In reply to Cameron94:

i use chalk also just to dry the cut up then finger tape it, works ok for me. dunno how safe but it works :)
BusyLizzie on 27 May 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:

Thank you all* very much indeed!! Lots of marvellous suggestions for me to investigate before the next climbing trip/clumsy episode.

*except Tim, who knows too much about my culinary problems.
NaCl - on 28 May 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:

Hold the sides together and a drop of superglue if its bad and fingertape/electrical tape if not.

Always worked for me so far.
ads.ukclimbing.com
mbh - on 28 May 2014
In reply to Turdus torquatus:

Tried that today with Boots own brand. Worked fine for a sweaty 10 miles run.

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