/ How strong is a repaired tent?

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bendep - on 17 Jun 2014
Hi guys,
I have recently bought a used tent that (unbeknownst to me) has two holes in it - one on the fly, the other on the floor. The holes have been repaired, however I'm sceptical as to how strong/durable this sort of repair is, as the tent will be heavily used.
Thanks a lot for your opinions,
Ben
CurlyStevo - on 17 Jun 2014
In reply to bendep:

No one can answer that without more info about the holes (size, exact location) and repair job!
bendep - on 17 Jun 2014
In reply to bendep:

The repair-glue goes about 2cm in diameter round the holes, which are no longer visible. It was apparently done by the company (Crux). One of the holes is on the sloping segment of the wind-end of the tent (if that makes sense - the end opposite the door when pitched) and the other is in. The middle of the floor basin, once again about 2cm diameter.
bendep - on 17 Jun 2014
In reply to CurlyStevo:

The repair-glue goes about 2cm in diameter round the holes, which are no longer visible. It was apparently done by the company (Crux). One of the holes is on the sloping segment of the wind-end of the tent (if that makes sense - the end opposite the door when pitched) and the other is in. The middle of the floor basin, once again about 2cm diameter.
Dorq on 17 Jun 2014
In reply to bendep:

I've had about a dozen small holes on the groundsheet of my Hilleberg for about 15 years, covered only in that self-adhesive nylon that you used see in packs of coloured squares, sold in the outdoor shops. Small circular patches, front and back of the fabric, never been a problem and the tent is well used. Also about six small holes in the inner, patched only with pieces of platypus repair stickers whenever I discovered them, always meaning to do a proper repair. I also have small holes in the sil-nylon fly that have never gotten any bigger.

In my opinion, it is nothing to worry about. Repairs only come apart through washing cycles, i.e. clothing, and geek strength tests to prove some data point.

Jon
tom.fox on 30 Jun 2014
In reply to Dorq:

ho Dorq-bought a pallo 2 last week and found a smal hole in the groundsheet on my return home after 2 nights out!I reckon im an experienced careful backpacker and there were no obvious things poking into the tent groundsheet.did you find the groundsheet material easily damaged?bit worried about my purchase...
Rick Graham on 30 Jun 2014
In reply to bendep:

Stop fussing.

Think of it as reinforcement.

A good glue and patch will probably be stronger ( albeit heavier ) than the original fabric on its own.
tom.fox on 01 Jul 2014
In reply to Rick Graham:

thanks feel much happier!
Dorq on 01 Jul 2014
In reply to tom.fox:
The stick-on nylon patches are still holding and looking 'hard core' instead of 'clumsy fool', so no worries. Incidentally, I recently had my sherpa make proper little patches for the yellow Nallo inner (they used to come with big squares of spare fabric, maybe they don't anymore) and the Platypus waterbottle patches were difficult to remove - so they are handy to have as permanent fixes as well, I guess.

To be fair to Hilleberg, I find their groundsheet material to be one of the best for the weight, though I cannot confirm that it is in fact as durable as it feels, when compared to other lightweight tents.

We also, well, my good sherpa friend, replaced all of the elastics with regular half-inch black waistband elastic from the sewing shop. It feels like the same stuff, time will tell. The front elastics around the zip was the most stretched, the rear hoop only at the top.

I carry some of the very thin foam, the sort that comes on the front of tv and monitors, folded up in my rucksack. That way, if you find yourself camped on a sharp rock, you can just push it under the inner and forget about it. Never used a 'footprint', except when car camping. Occasional boots in the tent, a bad habit, is probably my downfall, as it brings in little stones you don't see at first.

Jon

PS: I have seen large rolls of tent inner material in the sewing shop in Penrith, though that was a few years ago. They also had something which looked like silnylon, though it can't have been as it was purple. Always worth having a nose in shops like that in Cumbria, as it is probably end-of-roll type stuff from a local factory.
Post edited at 11:49
tom.fox on 02 Jul 2014
In reply to Dorq:

thanks-I suppose the only way to totally avoid any wear and tear is to stay at home!think I am over it now....

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