/ Symonds Yat: Emergency Procedures

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Xharlie on 19 Jun 2014

In the event of a trad. emergency occurring - one that cannot be resolved without assistance - what numbers should be phoned / procedures should be followed?

Specifically, I am asking about Symonds Yat because that's where I am going, next.

I am also interested in emergency procedures in general, in the UK, for all crags with reception.

EDIT: I have checked the guide book and the UKC Logbook and the BMC Access Database but none of those sources provide this information.
Post edited at 11:23
Richard White on 19 Jun 2014
In reply to Xharlie:

Phone 999 perhaps?

I have heard that number can usually put the caller through to the appropriate emergency service.

As for your other requests - how about go on a first aid course and a self-rescue climbing course?
kathrync - on 19 Jun 2014
In reply to Xharlie:
In the UK, you should dial 999 or 112 and ask for the police. They will coordinate everything.

One of the advantages of this is that if you dial an emergency number, your phone will use other carrier's networks if it cannot get a signal on your own network. However, be aware that if mountain rescue call you back to clarify information they may not be able to get hold of you if your signal is poor so give as much information as you can when you first make contact.

This website http://www.mountain.rescue.org.uk/mountain-advice/in-case-of-accident gives some information about the type of information you should have available when you call.
Post edited at 11:40
Xharlie on 19 Jun 2014
In reply to kathrync:

Thanks - that's exactly what I wanted to know.
In reply to Xharlie:

> In the event of a trad. emergency occurring

Do you mean a "traditional emergency" like someone hurting themselves and needing an ambulance? In which case sure phone 999 and be prepared to give accurate information as to where you are on the cliff is the cliff rescue people are involved (there is one for the lower Wye Valley, I presume they would cover the Yat aswell).

If you mean a "trad emergency" like realising suddenly that your coloured krabs don't match the slings of your cams, then careful preplanning and checking is what I would advise.
gdnknf on 19 Jun 2014
In reply to kathrync:

Kathryn's post is a very helpful one.

I'll just add to that: 112 is the number to dial if you aren't sure where you are as mobile providers will provide emergency services with location data immediately.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/112_(emergency_telephone_number)#E112

Also, if you send a text with 'register' in the body of text to 999, you register the ability to text the emergency services. Where there is very little signal, sometimes it is still possible to send a text and not a call. You can include lots of information in your text too:

http://www.emergencysms.org.uk/how_to_send_text.php
Timmd on 19 Jun 2014
In reply to Xharlie:
Yes, 112 gives a grid reference of where you are to the emergency services.
Post edited at 12:08
Simon Caldwell - on 19 Jun 2014
In reply to Timmd:

It is a myth that 112 gives anything that 999 does not. Either is just as good.
The key thing is to ask for the police, and not an ambulance, then tell the police that you need mountain rescue.
Dave 88 - on 19 Jun 2014
In reply to Xharlie:

> EDIT: I have checked the guide book and the UKC Logbook and the BMC Access Database but none of those sources provide this information.

If you buy the excellent climbers club guidebook to the area, it covers the best procedures for accidents there.

gdnknf on 19 Jun 2014
In reply to Xharlie:

Another useful tip I got from a first aid trainer. If you want someone contacting first in an emergency situation, put ICE before their name in the phone book:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/In_case_of_emergency

And if you find yourself on a motorway, unsure of your location:

"In the United Kingdom the Highways Agency have placed blue signs with the location printed on them, at approximately 500-metre intervals on their managed routes, such as motorways and major A-Roads. These signs contain a code which can be given to the emergency operator to locate you quickly. For example, a sign may say "M1 A 100.1". This translates as the M1 motorway, on the "Alpha" carriageway, at 100.1 kilometres from its start (or nominal start). The "Alpha" and "Bravo" carriageways are designated by the Highways Agency to each side of the road, dependent upon which direction it travels; other letters are used for additional carriageways at intersections."
John Willson - on 19 Jun 2014
In reply to Dave 88:

Thank you, Dave. What are you up to these days?

Yes, like all CC guides, the Symonds Yat guide has a page at the back detailing accident procedures. Dial 999 and ask for the police. As the Yat, like most of the Wye crags, is on the border between England and Wales you may need to specify which force you need.
nbonnett - on 19 Jun 2014
In reply to Xharlie:

Good to see you've a positive approach to your days out.
BusyLizzie on 20 Jun 2014
In reply to Xharlie:

At the risk of stating the obvious: you may be in a situation where what you want is an ambulance and NOT mountain rescue - a few months ago I was at SY and partner mashed his finger. There was no problem about walking back up to the car park and we specifically did not want anything more complicated than an ambulance. So in that sort of case when asked "fire,police or ambulance" it's worth stating very clearly that even though you are at a rock climbing venue you only want an ambulance and will meet in the carpark.

The folk on the phone had a bit of trouble understanding where we were: it may be worth saying "Symonds Yat car park, on the road from Christchurch to Symonds Yat East, on the left before the road starts going down the hill."

I hope you have a lovely time and that none of these things will happen! I have spent many happy hours at SY, and there is even a tea shack where you can get a really splendid lunch or all day breakfast. Mmmmyum.
Sir Chasm - on 20 Jun 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:
"fire,police or ambulance" or taxi?
Welsh Kate - on 20 Jun 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:

"At the risk of stating the obvious: you may be in a situation where what you want is an ambulance and NOT mountain rescue"

But only if the casualty is in or can get to the roadhead without causing any further injuries. If the casualty is not by a road or good track, you're very likely going to need the Police - Mountain Rescue route, even if you're also going to need an ambulance. If you just call Ambulance, you'll only get an ambulance regardless of how difficult a stretcher evacuation might be.
BusyLizzie on 20 Jun 2014
In reply to Welsh Kate:

> But only if the casualty is in or can get to the roadhead without causing any further injuries. ... If you just call Ambulance, you'll only get an ambulance regardless of how difficult a stretcher evacuation might be.


Absolutely right. We wanted ambulance only because the injury was to a finger, and it was going to be perfectly safe and very quick to walk up to the car park.
BusyLizzie on 20 Jun 2014
In reply to Sir Chasm:

> "fire,police or ambulance" or taxi?

Ambulance, because although I had given first aid the (apparently broken) finger needed expert help quickly (in particular, being an injury that exposed the bone it needed drenching with disinfectant or whatever it is they use), because the ambulance knew which hospital to go to, and because the ambulance could get him there quicker than I could and with pain relief available.
Sir Chasm - on 20 Jun 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie: Definite lack of moral fibre these days.

Tom W - on 20 Jun 2014
In reply to BusyLizzie:

Had said mashed finger created an inability to drive?
Sandstone Stickman - on 20 Jun 2014
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

Re: "It is a myth that 112 gives anything that 999 does not. Either is just as good. "

Can you give a source for this confirmation? Its very hard to find anything concrete on the subject. But on a recent first aid course it was re-iterated that 112 used licensed technology not available to the 999 number (I know - its a stretch to believe it!) - While I hope it is a myth, its certainly standing the test of time if it is.

The same is true for the pre registration for emergency texting, what does that actually achieve? Again, difficult to find solid / official information.

Cheers
Sandstone Stickman - on 20 Jun 2014
In reply to Xharlie:
Further to above, the main (Credible)reason for remembering 112 is that it is a europe wide number. So when cragging in spain and you need help, 112 will still work, furthermore I'm told that they have to offer the local language as well as Enlish, europe wide (much to the upset of the french).

(Complete tangent - Has anyone else noticed that increasingly when you google a question, forums like UKC / Singletrack world / pistonheads etc pop up with answers. How long before UKC replaces wikipidia?! ;-)
Post edited at 17:25
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BusyLizzie on 20 Jun 2014
In reply to Tom W:

> Had said mashed finger created an inability to drive?

Yes. But we were in my car. I could have driven him to hospital, and would have done so if required, but the ambulance (car, not big lorry-thing) got him there faster than I could ('cos it had a siren), and with pain relief to hand (gas-and-air; I was quite envious, having rather enjoyed that stuff in childbirth; but apparently it is not so much fun in these circs).

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