/ finger grip exercises dramatically reduce blood pressure

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
kevin stephens - on 02 Sep 2016
Andy Morley - on 02 Sep 2016
In reply to kevin stephens:

Really interesting for me as I've been using my Gripmaster medium a lot lately, not quite sure why but I get the feeling that I get something out of it. I'd also be really interested in details of their HIIT regime - it's not specified in detail in the article, are you aware of where it can be found written out somehow as a programme to follow?
stp - on 02 Sep 2016
In reply to kevin stephens:

Very interesting topic. I like Michael Moseley's sincerity and watched The Truth About Exercise some time ago.

The grip strength dynamometer looks like an interesting device too. Never seen one before.

It doesn't say how often the do the grip strength exercise. Presumably it implies that regularly climbing may well lengthen one's life though. Bad news for drugs companies though. Blood pressure drugs are huge.

Anyone know if that same programme listed (Trust Me I'm a Doctor) about this same topic?

no_more_scotch_eggs - on 02 Sep 2016
In reply to kevin stephens:

Would love to see more about the sample size and the way they dealt with potential confounders; and it's results replicated and published in a peer reviewed journal; but really interesting and I think I will be following his lead. ...
icnoble on 02 Sep 2016
SenzuBean - on 02 Sep 2016
In reply to kevin stephens:

They need to study it further, but it's possible that the hand grippers were doing the valsava maneuver while gripping - that would seem a possible mechanism for lowering blood pressure. If they weren't doing the valsava, I'd be shocked if they really did achieve such good results.
ukb shark - on 02 Sep 2016
In reply to stp:

> Presumably it implies that regularly climbing may well lengthen one's life though.


Unless it kills you

Andy Morley - on 02 Sep 2016
In reply to ukb shark:

> Unless it kills you

Life in general can be pretty bad for your health. Getting out of bed in the morning is extremely dangerous.
kj001 - on 02 Sep 2016
In reply to no_more_scotch_eggs:

Yes, I saw this article and noted that they used 4 groups with 6 people in each and then (presumably) simply quoted the means with no information on whether these are statistically significant results at all. On such small sample sizes, these results are quite likely to arise by chance (and that's why phase 3 clinical trials use very large numbers of subjects - and controls)
Rick Graham on 02 Sep 2016
In reply to Andy Morley:

> Life in general can be pretty bad for your health. Getting out of bed in the morning is extremely dangerous.

Interesting concept, but how dangerous is staying in bed?

A maxim heard recently is that , over 70, a week in bed takes 10 years off your life.
Rick Graham on 02 Sep 2016
In reply to kj001:

Is this just a sales ploy?

I have just ordered a (cheap) grip tester,

before my wife buys an expensive one
Andy Morley - on 02 Sep 2016
In reply to Rick Graham:

> A maxim heard recently is that , over 70, a week in bed takes 10 years off your life.

I guess it would rather depend on 'who with'...
atlantis on 11 Sep 2016
In reply to kevin stephens:

If you really want help reducing blood pressure, eat less salt. Fact.
3
Yanis Nayu - on 11 Sep 2016
In reply to kevin stephens:

> Apparently


Depends what you're gripping and what you're doing with it I guess...
cb294 - on 11 Sep 2016
In reply to atlantis:

Fact? Useless factoid or superseded information more like. Reducing salt intake was the mantra for the last 20 years or so, until proper analysis showed that for most patients it barely makes any difference at all.
CB
kenr - on 11 Sep 2016

Important point for climbers:

Grip exercises designed for other sports or for the general public
and
Measured grip strength using a hand dynamometer . . .

-> have little correlation with success in rock climbing.

Different grip sizes and configurations are critical for success / performance than for "general" gripping.
Requires strength in different muscles.

Ken
Post edited at 14:29
BGG - on 11 Oct 2016
In reply to kevin stephens:

Small sample, not very biologically plausible, would be astonishing if it were replicated in a large trial.
jsmcfarland - on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to kevin stephens:

The salt thing................lol. I throw buckets of salt in the cooking water for meals. The idea that it is harmful unless in ridiculously high doses or special cases is bunk
ads.ukclimbing.com
marsbar - on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to BGG:

There seem to be a few studies that found the same but all with small numbers.

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.