/ How to I 'give away' an out house?

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Timmd on 17 Sep 2016

My outhouse is in my immediate neighbour's garden, with three other in a row being along what would be their fence line (the outhouses don't straddle the fence line). With my having said I'm not bothered about whether it's an outhouse or a patch of ground (because it's such a small and damp run down building), three of them are gong to be knocked down, with my neighbour's being the one at the other end of the row remaining.

My neighbour wants everything tied up legally (and so do I if it helps), so that in the possible sale of my house there's no ambiguity, so that the next person to live in my house can't claim to have access to a small patch of ground towards the far end of their garden.

What's the simplest way of going about this (cheapest too - but I'm guessing they go hand in hand)?

Many thanks
Tim


Post edited at 18:02
Dan Arkle - on 17 Sep 2016
In reply to Timmd:

If i recall correctly it cost more than 400 legal fees to buy my neighbour's.

Unless you have a tame lawyer, don't bother.
Timmd on 17 Sep 2016
In reply to Dan Arkle:
Maybe I'll suggest going halves on the legal fees.

Could you have a ponder on how correctly you're recalling (if you get the spirit I'm asking in)?

Edit: That's a bit cheerier, I'm not being charged for it being knocked down because the lady organising it just wants them gone from her life (she's spoken of dreaming about them being knocked down on the day she leaves her home).
Post edited at 18:37
wercat on 17 Sep 2016
In reply to Timmd:

as it's her wish shouldn't she foot the legal cost of you losing your plot too?
Timmd on 17 Sep 2016
In reply to wercat:

I offered to give it to her (possibly foolishly before I'd imagined how high the costs might be), but I don't suppose giving it to her means paying for all the legal fees too since it's benefiting her in the long run.
brianjcooper on 17 Sep 2016
In reply to Timmd:
I once owned a terrace house with similar outhouses. I would very politely suggest to your neighbour that she pays the costs as she is gaining the 'ground' small as it is, and as you don't want it there should be no expensive legal issues. Can you knock it down yourselves to save money?

I wished you had been my neighbour.
Post edited at 18:54
marsbar - on 17 Sep 2016
In reply to Timmd:

She needs to pay for the legal fees if she is that bothered. Personally I think it's very generous of you to not charge her for the plot.
1
Timmd on 17 Sep 2016
In reply to brianjcooper:
I'm not knocking it down, my mildly nutty neighbour is paying for it to be knocked down after having asked me if I wanted it (which I don't), and I'd not really thought about it any further until my immediate neighbour voiced her concerns about legal complexities, not ever using it ment I'd not needed to think about it beyond saying I don't mind if it gets knocked down.

I think I've been lucky enough to grow up in an agreeable setting where my family and the family next door shared costs for a new fence even though it belonged to us, because it benefited both gardens to have a nice new fence. I've absorbed that style being a neighbour perhaps (which sounds like I'm talking myself up).
Post edited at 19:18
Timmd on 17 Sep 2016
In reply to marsbar:
> She needs to pay for the legal fees if she is that bothered. Personally I think it's very generous of you to not charge her for the plot.

I'd have to walk past her kitchen window and up near the end of her garden to access the plot, and would feel intrusive doing that, and if I keep it as part of my home, the next person might not feel rude/intrusive, and we all have to watch what we're spending. It's a 4 or 5 foot square bit of ground in the end - which is probably less use to me than an outhouse which things would go rusty in when I'd feel intrusive going to and from it.

Keeping it won't improve my quality of life.
Post edited at 19:21
1
Timmd on 17 Sep 2016
In reply to marsbar:
That's an interesting development, it seems mildly nutty neighbour hadn't told 'furthest' neighbour about the plan for a raised bed in the ground left by the outhouses, who might actually quite like a shed there to keep her bike in, so mildly nutty neighbour's dream of seeing the back of the outhouses comes to a pause.

I'm thinking my garden may benefit from the extra light as the sun sets behind where the outhouses are, which seems to make me the one who is the least concerned about the whole thing. Makes a change to having anxiety in the past. ;-)

Thanks for the thoughts peeps. If it comes to it I'll probably say my immediate neighbour has to pay any legal fees for me to not own that patch of ground anymore so she can do.
Post edited at 19:50
marsbar - on 17 Sep 2016
In reply to Timmd:
I know you are happy to get rid of it, but you shouldn't have to pay to do so. Also you could argue that a future buyer of your house might want the outhouse. My sister did hers up and it was useful.

If it does get demolished, I'm assuming it's old, the bricks do have salvage value, you could either sell them or use them in your own garden.

Post edited at 20:40
1
MG - on 17 Sep 2016
In reply to Timmd:

Suggest speaking to a local lawyer(not chain), and asking what it might cost. Does sound like your neighbour's responsibility though.
crisp - on 18 Sep 2016
In reply to Timmd:

Do you have a mortgage on your property? If so the mortgage company will need to be informed if you decide to give part of the land away.
MG - on 18 Sep 2016
In reply to crisp:

Good point. They may even want to know about knocking permanent things down.
birdie num num - on 18 Sep 2016
In reply to Timmd:

The cheapest thing is to agree to the demolition and forget it.
In the future, anyone buying your house might lay claim to the useless few square feet of land (if indeed it is even registered in the title deeds)
If your neighbour wants it all tied up legally, well leave it to them. Sign on the dotted line when required.
bouldery bits - on 18 Sep 2016
In reply to birdie num num:

> The cheapest thing is to agree to the demolition and forget it.

> In the future, anyone buying your house might lay claim to the useless few square feet of land (if indeed it is even registered in the title deeds)

> If your neighbour wants it all tied up legally, well leave it to them. Sign on the dotted line when required.

You can't give a sensible answer!!!
Deleted bagger - on 18 Sep 2016
In reply to Timmd:

Before we bought our current house, as a wreck, the seller signed over his share of a shared outside dry privy. We agreed to this and another neighbour also. The person who wanted it, largely because it formed a boundary to their, paid the legal fees. All very amicable.
ultrabumbly on 19 Sep 2016
In reply to Timmd:

Allow the demolition. Keep the land. Hire a sculptor. WIN WIN!
ads.ukclimbing.com
Timmd on 19 Sep 2016
In reply to ultrabumbly:
A cherub urinating into some water. ;-)
Post edited at 17:01

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