/ NEWS: FRI NIGHT VID: Empowered - Molly Mitchell

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.
UKC News - on 17:01 Fri
Molly Mitchell, 2 kbTonight's Friday video features 22 year-old, up-and-coming US trad climber Molly Mitchell on her new routes, All Hell Breaks Moose, 5.13 R and Dangerous Woman, 5.12 S outside Moab in the Utah desert. A protégée of offwidth crack fanatic Pamela Shanti Pack, we could be hearing more about Molly's ascents in the future.

"All or nothing is the name of the game with first ascents like this; falling is not an option."



Read more
Michael Gordon - on 18:16 Fri
In reply to UKC News:

Good stuff. Some terrible holds on that route!
Wayne S - on 22:27 Fri
In reply to UKC News:
I'm like super motivated to express myself on the rock tomorrow, whoop whoop, high five dude.............jeeez, is it me, am I getting that old!

drgrange - on 22:40 Fri
In reply to Wayne S:

Like all aboard the super motivated send train
Robert Durran - on 00:04 Sat
In reply to UKC News:

I feel, like, super empowered after, like, watching that. Like, whatever that means.
tomrainbow - on 06:31 Sat
In reply to Robert Durran:
It seemed a bit odd that she was banging on about trad not being about how hard it is, more about the mental game and dealing the fear...and then she's gone and climbed her project as a sports climb!?! Like, wtf? Underwhelming.
Robert Durran - on 09:02 Sat
In reply to tomrainbow:
To be fair, she did say the gear was largely psychological. Still no idea what this super empowerment thing is though.
Post edited at 09:15
olddirtydoggy - on 09:20 Sat
In reply to UKC News:

Drivel.
john arran - on 09:32 Sat
In reply to UKC News:

Are there any Americans who just go climbing and get up pretty hard things without feeling like it's a transcendental or life-changing experience?

Some of the videos ascents we see here are clearly extremely (super?) hard routes and fine efforts but the level of seemingly unnecessary introspection that often goes along with them seems to border on neuroticism.
jas wood - on 10:54 Sat
In reply to UKC News:

I'm glad other folk have relayed what i was thinking. This was cringe worthy for me and so contradictory.

Not for me and for that reason I'm out, sorry to be negative.


Hans Lindqvist - on 11:48 Sat
In reply to john arran:

Maybe they actually use feelings when they climb.
Hugh Cottam - on 12:35 Sat
In reply to Hans Lindqvist:

Personally I find feelings are rubbish for climbing. They won't get you up anything. You'll find many top climbers are in fact emotional deserts.
Robert Durran - on 12:49 Sat
In reply to UKC News:

Presumably a US audience doesn't even raise an eyebrow at this sort of metabollocks. So I wonder what they think of a quietly understated British film such as Transition that just lets the climbing and characters shine through in a matter of fact sort of way. Distilled also springs to mind.
Robert Durran - on 12:49 Sat
In reply to Hans Lindqvist:

> Maybe they actually use feelings when they climb.

Why not just use the holds?
Robert Durran - on 12:51 Sat
In reply to Hugh Cottam:

> You'll find many top climbers are in fact emotional deserts.

I like deserts. They give you space, sharpen the senses, make you notice things.

Tom Knowles - on 13:57 Sat
In reply to john arran:

> Are there any Americans who just go climbing and get up pretty hard things without feeling like it's a transcendental or life-changing experience?

Alex Honnold, Tommy Caldwell, Mikey Schaefer, Cedar Wright, Hayden Kennedy, Josh Wharton, Colin Haley, Kelly Cordes.... maybe there's a link between cold, hard mountain mileage and a lack of pretension?
Tom Knowles - on 14:04 Sat
In reply to Robert Durran:

> Presumably a US audience doesn't even raise an eyebrow at this sort of metabollocks. So I wonder what they think of a quietly understated British film such as Transition that just lets the climbing and characters shine through in a matter of fact sort of way. Distilled also springs to mind.

I agree about Transition, very understated, very revealing. Distilled was different, more a contrived project I thought, and I felt Andy Cave played to the camera a bit too much, both in what he talked about and also with some of his climbing. It didn't run anywhere near as naturally as Transition.
Robert Durran - on 14:09 Sat
In reply to Tom Knowles:

> Distilled was different, more a contrived project I thought, and I felt Andy Cave played to the camera a bit too much, both in what he talked about and also with some of his climbing.

I didn't think that, though I didn't care for the poetical interludes!

Cog - on 18:56 Sat
In reply to Robert Durran:

> Still no idea what this super empowerment thing is though.

If you did you would be leading E8!
Cog - on 18:57 Sat
In reply to Robert Durran:

> Presumably a US audience doesn't even raise an eyebrow at this sort of metabollocks. So I wonder what they think of a quietly understated British film such as Transition that just lets the climbing and characters shine through in a matter of fact sort of way. Distilled also springs to mind.

I sent a 'Transition' link to a friend in New York. She liked it but thought it needed sub titles.
orge - on 19:30 Sat
In reply to UKC News:
Way too much navel gazing for my tastes!
Thread is much better than the video!

J
Stone Idle - on 20:54 Sat
In reply to UKC News:

A friend coined a word for this - testiculation - which is talking total bollocks
rtinma on 22:13 Sat
In reply to UKC News:

Yes, there are some excessive slo-mo moments of self-analysis, but I think that it is good to see climbing leading the way in the empowerment of women, which is long overdue in too many areas of life. Apparently gender pay equality won't come about until 2069!
Robert Durran - on 09:20 Sun
In reply to rtinma:
> I think that it is good to see climbing leading the way in the empowerment of womem.

So are you saying that all the superempowerment stuff is specifically a gender thing? Or just that it is good to see womem climbing hard? Could a man feel superempowered by his climbing? I must admit that it never occurred to me that this film might be about gender issues.

> Apparently gender pay equality won't come about until 2069!

Can these things really be predicted fifty years ahead to the nearest year? Anyway, if anything, I would have thought that gender grade equality due in October 2027 would be more relevant here.
Post edited at 09:28
Fraser on 10:00 Sun
In reply to UKC News:

I was holding off replying to this video for not wanting to come over as negative, but now that many others have clearly said what I was thinking, I'll wage in with my tuppence. I simply can't see how climbing a route 'expresses myself' or 'empowers me'. Nice photography though.
TobyA on 11:59 Sun
In reply to Robert Durran:

> I must admit that it never occurred to me that this film might be about gender issues.

Of course you didn't, that's your male privilege.
...
;)
...
Sort of.

I've made my peace with youngish Americans putting super in front of every adjective. Then it becomes super-endearing rather than super-annoying.
Chris Harris - on 12:40 Sun
In reply to UKC News:

Maybe we should try to even things up a bit & write a load of articles along the following lines and post them on some American climbing sites.

Whether they would find them amusing, educational or puzzling is hard to say. Probably just call us a bunch of uptight Limeys & wonder what the hell we were on about.

"Mr John Smith has climbed Route X, Grade Y."

"It is with great pleasure that Mr John Smith, the English rock climber, announces that he has successfully climbed Route X, Grade Y. Mr Smith kindly took the time to speak to us following his successful attempt on the route in England's beautiful Blah Valley.
Despite the recent less than clement weather conditions, Mr Smith was able to spend several days recently, attempting to force an ascent of this most challenging of problems.
Mr Smith informs us that a combination of decidedly small handholds, and the impending nature of the route, meant that a considerable number of attempts on the route did not meet with success, although encouraging upwards progress was made.

Eventually, a day of settled weather arrived, and following a most satisfactory repast, Mr Smith was able to complete a successful ascent of the route without having to resort to the use of pitons or etriers.

Upon gaining the top, Mr Smith allowed himself a most uncharacteristic moment of self-congratulation, and the valley was heard to echo to the sound of "Whoah. Yeah, I'm the man. Woo, woo, I sent it. Yeah".

Mr Smith's companions offered him hearty congratulations, and they retired to a nearby hostelry where his achievement was celebrated with toasts and speeches".
Wayne S - on 14:08 Sun
In reply to Michael Gordon:

My initial rant seems to have super empowered others to express themselves.
Dudes, I'm like super stoked. It's like totally rad.
Wayne S - on 14:24 Sun
In reply to Chris Harris:

I like the general concept, however I do think we should consider down scaling self congratulation to "a short but brisk handshake, followed by coughs and uncomfortable shuffling".
Greg Lucas - on 18:00 Sun
In reply to UKC News:
This is like an advert for something you really don't want to buy. Dreadful nonsense. Give me Fred Beckey and his 'piss-burger' any day. But it has given me an idea for a film. It's about a super-endowed stud with short arms, but he climbs long routes. He has to layback everything, slabs even. The film will be about more about his struggle to stay in contact with the rock, than himself.
Post edited at 18:29
Hugh Cottam - on 20:02 Sun
Sweet. Or on second thoughts like, supersweet.

Robert Durran - on 20:16 Sun
In reply to TobyA:
> Of course you didn't, that's your male privilege.

> ;)

> Sort of.

So am I allowed to turn the sound down and watch someone, who just happens to be a woman, doing a hard climb?
Or does that make me a bad person?
Post edited at 20:36
TobyA on 20:22 Sun
In reply to Robert Durran:

> So am I allowed to turn he sound down and watch someone, who just happens to be a woman, doing a hard climb?

> Or does that make me a bad person?

No that's fine. Just don't forget to notice her (and I presume your) whiteness or you'll be missing the whole intersectionality of the text.
Shapeshifter - on 09:22 Mon
In reply to Wayne S:

> I like the general concept, however I do think we should consider down scaling self congratulation to "a short but brisk handshake, followed by coughs and uncomfortable shuffling".

Like that, belter.......lol.......er....whatever that means!
Frank the Husky - on 10:43 Mon
In reply to UKC News: Given the amount of grief the WideBoyz got when they did Century Crack with preplaced gear, I guess the same thing will happen here and she'll go back one day and do it placing gear on the lead. I enjoyed seeing the desert again, it's a wonderful place.

Chris Harris - on 16:52 Mon
In reply to UKC News:

Has this tripe appeared on any equivalent US site? And if so, what are the user comments like? I shudder to think.
Will Hunt - on 17:17 Mon
In reply to UKC News:

Geez, don't you guys get it? When Molly gets to the top of the route she finds a big mushroom. It runs away from her and she catches it, and when she eats it she gets bigger. That's empowerment!

Power up, Molly! Power up, dudes!

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.