/ Complete novice

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DenzelLN - on 24 Sep 2016
Hello everyone,

I have had a long time fascination with mountains, and i am a keen reader of all books mountain related. My question is where would one start?

A climbing wall or a mountaineering course? Join a mointaineering club or just pick it up from wherever you can?

Id like to get involved and just wondering how!

Im 27 male, reasonably fit and in the nw of england.

pdone on 24 Sep 2016
In reply to DenzelLN:

Contact some local mountaineering clubs with a view to joining one of them. They all differ and one will probably suit you more than others.
routrax - on 24 Sep 2016
In reply to DenzelLN:

A day out in the mountains on a guided scramble could be a good way of seeing what it's like.
1
teh_mark on 24 Sep 2016
In reply to DenzelLN:

One approach is to get out into the hills in summer do do a lot of hillwalking and scrambling, moving into winter hillwalking and gaining experience of moving over the same sort of terrain in snowy conditions, before heading to the Alps and attempting easier mountaineering routes out there. Joining a club would help you gain the skills and experience safely, while giving you a ready supply of partners.

The other approach would be through rock climbing; maybe starting indoors with a course at a wall, before heading outside with an experienced partner or with a club. Eventually this will converge with the hillwalking route as you find yourself in the hills to approach technical routes.

With the ultimate goal of climbing alpine routes, I started off with rock climbing. I was in Chamonix in summer - my second alpine season - with another couple of inexperienced partners who were more winter walking people. The difference was quite amusing - they were very happy moving over snow in crampons with confidence, but their ropework and ability to protect things well and efficiently were definitely lacking. On the other hand, I spent most of my time with a healthy paranoia that I was about to stab my trousers with my front points and launch myself over the side of a ridge - but when it came to protection and ropework I definitely had the upper hand. I guess the ultimate goal is to become a well-rounded climber, and for that you'll need to get out regularly both on rock and in the hills.

I was speaking to a guide out there too who reckoned that rock climbing is the key fundamental skill to alpine climbing. I wasn't sure I agreed while teetering along a precipitous snow ridge, but in hindsight I'd hazard a guess that crampon and axe skills are a lot easier for a climber to pick up than ropework for a non-climber.
Mike Nolan - on 24 Sep 2016
In reply to DenzelLN:
Hi Denzel!

I run mountaineering courses, which would be a great place to start. Check out my website and get in touch if you have any questions. Www.mikenolanmountaineering.co.uk

If there's something specific you'd like to learn or do, let me know as I can tailor my courses to suit you.

Cheers!

Mike

07730533295
info@mikenolanmountaineering.co.uk
Post edited at 21:29
DenzelLN - on 25 Sep 2016
In reply to teh_mark:

Hello, i think starting off rock climbing will be the way, as i think id be more likely to meet like minded people also joining a club...ill look into that.

I have climbed as a youngster so i do have a good idea of the basics.

I have looked at courses and while they sound great i am now a student so funds are limited, i have a few quid stashed but not endless amounts!!

My uni has a mountaineering society....they go out and about all the time, would it be worth joining up?

Denzel.
Andy Hardy on 25 Sep 2016
In reply to DenzelLN:

[...]

> My uni has a mountaineering society....they go out and about all the time, would it be worth joining up?

> Denzel.

Yes deffo.
teh_mark on 25 Sep 2016
In reply to DenzelLN:

> My uni has a mountaineering society....they go out and about all the time, would it be worth joining up?

What the man above said, uni climbing/mountaineering clubs are a fantastic opportunity to get involved.
mff513 on 29 Sep 2016
In reply to DenzelLN:

hey if you live by the lakes my advice would be to just get using a map and compass. from there youre gonna progress to harder walking then to maybe winter walking and graded scrambling in a few years dont rush it with a course i think the best way is to just walk with a map. climbing is all well and good but whats the point of you cant read a map or take a bearing off a compass. can you please elaborate on what it is you wish to do in the mountains no good taking a course in winter climbing if you want to fell run and vice versa.
DenzelLN - on 16 Oct 2016
In reply to mff513:

Hello, sorry its been a while, things have been hectic.

To be honest id like to just get into the mountains, walking, trekking, learning rope work etc but i don't really want to pay someone vast amounts of money to do it!

marra - on 16 Oct 2016
In reply to DenzelLN:

in that case, best bet is to get a map and compass, and try some easy routes first, thats how I started about 12 months ago, whilst I am far from being an expert, I can now use my map and copass with some degree of comfort, and find my way round, also get a copy of viewranger for your phone, its a great back up for when you do take the odd wrong turn !!!
ChrisH89 - on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to DenzelLN:

Clubs!
ads.ukclimbing.com
paul_the_northerner - on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to DenzelLN:

Where about in the NW are you based?

Deffo Join a local club. A mate of mine is in the Lancaster uni club and they have trips all over the UK and Europe.

When it comes to learning the hills there is no substitute for just getting out and doing it. guides and courses are fine and i am sure they help but i dont know anyone personally who needed one when starting out, just be realistic and stick to well marked routes to start with.

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