/ Kitting the Teenager out

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Dave the Rave on 11 Oct 2016
I'm kitting the teenager out for Autumn, winter, spring hillwalking .
She's outgrown most of her kit and I'm replacing on a budget.
She's 14, 5'4'' and athletic.
So far I've got her a Keela Munro jacket for 100, which is excellent ( thanks Loch Ness Ferry Company for excellent customer service),
A mountain warehouse merino which is great.
A marmot driime for a tenner.
Buffalo mitts for a fiver
Balaclava for three quid.
She has over trousers and boots.
What is recommended for leg wear? Currently she has merino long johns and Ron hills which I think are a good combination? What do your kids use ?
She probably needs some gaiters and micro spikes which I've seen for 30.
What do your kids take for a full on hill day?
abr1966 - on 11 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

Congratulations in getting your teenage kid on the hill!!! Having taken both of mine climbing from an early age 13/14 was a switch for both into shopping, costa coffee, guitars and city life!!
wbo - on 11 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave: will underwear, cheap fleece, soft shell trousers. Raincoat/'goretex', primaloft jacket, hat, ski gloves.

No gaiters, haven't used them in years. No crampons, but x-skis instead

BnB - on 11 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

My son is roughly the same size so he gets my cast-offs and I get a new jacket/helmet/tee shirt
Dave the Rave on 11 Oct 2016
In reply to abr1966:

> Congratulations in getting your teenage kid on the hill!!! Having taken both of mine climbing from an early age 13/14 was a switch for both into shopping, costa coffee, guitars and city life!!

Sorry to hear about that. Mines always liked it and also likes shopping and feckin Costa, but she seems keen and a new collie has helped.
Timmd on 11 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:
With you being on a budget in mind, I'm thinking some waterproof trousers to keep the wind as well as the rain out could be a good idea? They'd be something worth buying anyway I guess, and you can see if she's comfortable using that solution before buying more outdoor clothing.

Some Craghopper trousers which are 'mostly windproof' could be a good shout too, I fairly often put them over the top of something else for the right mixture of warmth and windproofness, you might find them for less than £20 at Go Outdoors..

It can be a very personal thing, what to wear when outdoors...
Post edited at 22:19
Guy Hurst - on 11 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

Decathlon sell some really good softshell trousers under their Quechua and Simond brands for around 30, plus loads of other kit at very low prices. For winter walking, I'd go for a pair of flexible walking crampons. They're better in real snow on steep ground, and one pair covers a much wider range of foot sizes than the microspikes do, so they'll do your daughter for a lot longer. They come up for sale on here often enough. Any old gaiters will do.
Dave the Rave on 11 Oct 2016
In reply to Timmd:

Got some OTs matey. Craghoppers are good, got some myself but I think ronnies and long johns may suffice and be warmer? There's some vapour rise trousers going cheap but not sure whether these will be better than the other combination??
Timmd on 11 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:
I wear vapour rise under my Craghoppers as my vapour rise can have the wind go through them a little bit sometimes, first noticed it when riding down a hill during the winter, and it's almost become habitual to put the Craghoppers over them if it's cold enough for my vapour rise. .

http://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/walking-trouser-womens-p165454

Incidentally, these are going for £10 which might do the same kind of thing I use my Craghopper Kiwi's for - seems like they can need trying on to get a good fit. I guess if it was simple to buy outdoor gear you wouldn't see people frowning and going through lots of racks of clothing in outdoor shops. ;-)
Post edited at 22:55
brianjcooper on 11 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:
Trust me. After last weekend in the Peak District I was plenty grateful I had gaiters on crossing boggy terrain!

If she goes walking where she needs to wear crampons, she will most likely need a walking ice axe too.
Post edited at 23:52
Timmd on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to brianjcooper:
There's plenty of boggy wet stuff in the Peak, that's true, and puddles which are actually knee deep holes.

It's probably nothing 40mins walking wouldn't sort out in warming the wet foot up again though, or a spare pair of socks.
Post edited at 00:20
Bootrock on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to Timmd:

Always carry spare socks, there's nothing like that feeling of putting a nice clean pair of socks on when you're out and about. Get the tootsies all warmed and cosy.

CLYoung - on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

For a full day in winter (bearing in mind I've not got the skills to take us where ice axe and crampons are needed) my 14 year old son would take:

Salomon boots (not budget, but they were what fitted)
Dare2b thermal top and leggings
Craghoppers walking trousers
Peter Storm overtrousers
Craghoppers long sleeved base layer
Rab Boreal windtop thing (got it in a sale, I've got the Aurora, which is the women's equivalent)
Craghoppers fleece
Craghoppers Compresslite Packaway insulated jacket
Mountainwarehouse waterproof jacket
2 pairs of one size Mountainwarehouse gloves for use as liner gloves, one to have one, one spare
Mittens (Sealskinz I think) or Lowe Alpine Waterproof Gloves
Peter Storm neck gaiter
Peter Storm fleece hat
Katoolah Microspikes
Alpkit head torch

When we were in the Brecon Beacons in snow my sons took one each of my husband's cheap walking poles, can't remember the brand.

My son very rarely wears the overtrousers, the walking trousers over leggings are way more comfortable. But they're obviously necessary to have with us. Other than that, things get pretty well used.
DerwentDiluted - on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

Oops, came here thinking it was 'kicking the teenager out'.
Rob Naylor - on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to DerwentDiluted:

I read it the same!
Sealwife - on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

Craghopper Kiwi Pro lined winter trousers are fantastic. Really warm, pretty much windproof and will repel some water as well (not in a proper downpour, but light drizzle they'll be fine).
Hat Dude on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

The Decathlon "Raincut" waterproof trousers are brilliant value for 8.99

http://www.decathlon.co.uk/raincut-womens-waterproof-trousers-black-id_8355682.html

I've been using the men's ones for a couple of years now and they've stood up to full wet days on the hill. They were bought to keep in the sack for occasional unexpected use but now get taken out far more often than my much more expensive ones.

Nice and compact pack size and not baggy and flappy to wear
brianjcooper on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to Timmd:

Sounds like we've both been there a few times. Not much fun walking wet feet dry in the Winter though.
GrahamD - on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

Buy a hat and gloves they actually want to wear ! I doubt I'd have got our daughter anywhere near a balaclava.
Dave the Rave on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to GrahamD:

> Buy a hat and gloves they actually want to wear ! I doubt I'd have got our daughter anywhere near a balaclava.

Yeah. She's not a fashion victim and appreciates functionality over 'brand'.
She went up Skiddaw last year with a high wind chill and snow on the ground. I consider, as does she, a balaclava to be essential in these conditions in order to prevent frost nip and enable you to chew your food.( she has a trendy Lowe Alpinestyle cap too). Gloves. I wear buff mitts and these are excellent for those conditions. I've got her some for pence compared to some trendy gloves at 30x the cost.
Dave the Rave on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to brianjcooper:

> Trust me. After last weekend in the Peak District I was plenty grateful I had gaiters on crossing boggy terrain!
I agree. These are top of the list now.
> If she goes walking where she needs to wear crampons, she will most likely need a walking ice axe too.
Yep. I've got a spare axe and think the advice of adjustable crampons as opposed to micro spikes may be worthwhile.( I can borrow the adjustable a
Dave the Rave on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to CLYoung:

Ta. That's the list I'm working towards.
I'm going to try and get a second hand Myo XP headtorch though.
A cheap, functional, zipped, synthetic insulated jacket is a must buy too. Any recommendations?
brianjcooper on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

I also attached short lengths of cord to the zips on some of my gear. It helps to get a grip when
your fingers are frozen. EG. Gaiters. Hope this isn't too patronising. I learnt the hard way.
mike123 - on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:
look out for sale stuff of premium brands , you might be suprised how cheap some x small and small sized stuff goes for at end of sale time. Also if you are not already get on sport pursuit website , often deals on kids stuff.
Post edited at 19:53
jethro kiernan - on 12 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

Sports pursuit sometimes have kids stuff on sale, or small adult
Decathlon still good value
Rog Wilko on 13 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

Strange what the mind can do unprompted - I read this as Kicking the Teenager Out.
LastBoyScout on 13 Oct 2016
In reply to Rog Wilko:

> Strange what the mind can do unprompted - I read this as Kicking the Teenager Out.

I was sure I wasn't the only one

Marge "Homer, you remember your promise to the kids?"
Homer "Sure - when you're 18, you're out of here"

OP - TK Maxx can come up trumps for outdoor kit, but it's a bit hit and miss.
CLYoung - on 14 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

My son has found his Cragghoppers Compresslite pretty good. It doesn't have any sort of adjustment on the hood though - fine for him, with his big head, but might be a problem for some.
Deri Jones - on 14 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave the Rave:

Sport pursuit have a Berg Outdoors primaloft jacket for 45 at the moment that appears to be a similar weight to the Montane Prism jacket. Ordered one for my partner, so no idea if it is any good yet.
My Prism is one of the best bits of kit I've ever bought - light enough and incredibly warm even when wet.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Dave the Rave on 14 Oct 2016
In reply to Deri Jones:

> Sport pursuit have a Berg Outdoors primaloft jacket for 45 at the moment that appears to be a similar weight to the Montane Prism jacket. Ordered one for my partner, so no idea if it is any good yet.

> My Prism is one of the best bits of kit I've ever bought - light enough and incredibly warm even when wet.

Thanks for that. Ive seen a decent down jacket on fleebay for 35 and might go for that. Its intended as a warm up coat if cold so we would probably be in the bothy. If it's wet when we're off the hill I would dry it.

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