/ Lyme disease at Diabaig?

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Rich W Parker - on 16 Oct 2016


A note of caution: I'm being treated for (as a precautionary measure) Lyme having being bitten on a visit to Diabaig Little Big Wall. The spread seems to be growing exponentially, which is worrying as it has the potential to be highly debilitating. The key, if infected, seems to be to get treatment quickly.

On another note, Calcite Corner is a total sandbag and not the 'warm up' we expected!
jezb1 - on 16 Oct 2016
In reply to Rich W Parker:

Get well soon, I'm on antibiotics for it at the moment too
TobyA on 16 Oct 2016
In reply to Rich W Parker:

Hope everything goes well. I was pushing through all that bracken below Diabaig about 6 weeks ago. I don't think I got any ticks that day, but the night before I found about 10 on me after climbing at Jetty Crag at Gruinard Bay, not too far away. It seems ticks are big issue in the NW these days.
bouldery bits - on 16 Oct 2016
In reply to Rich W Parker:

Get well soon mate!
idiotproof (Buxton MC) - on 16 Oct 2016
In reply to Rich W Parker:

Why do they seem so much more abundant the last few years.... is it the lack of a supercold winter?
veteye on 16 Oct 2016
In reply to Rich W Parker:

At least GPs seem to be more aware these days.
At least we don't get sandflies.
DerwentDiluted - on 16 Oct 2016
In reply to idiotproof (Buxton MC):
> Why do they seem so much more abundant the last few years.... is it the lack of a supercold winter?

I have visited this area all my life, staying at the croft known to climbers as White House Crag, upto about 15 years ago the area between Alligin and Diabaig was grazed by sheep, these were dipped to kill ticks and despite rolling in the bracken and heather as a child in never got ticks. Now the sheep are fenced in on the Alligin side, and the Diabaig side is left to the wild goats and deer, which never get dipped. Now it's common to get many many ticks here, so though mild winters have helped, it's the change of grazing beast that I think is the main culprit.
Post edited at 23:48
Doug on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to Rich W Parker:

Worth being cautious, my partner is suffering from Lyme disease which went undiagnosed & untreated for many years (probably bitten in Fontainebleau). She's off work at the moment (yet again) and is extremely tired all the time, has a lot of back & neck pain & seems unable to be active for more than an hour or so at a time. A first long course of antibiotics helped a lot & for a while she was back to her old self, but the symptoms came back after a couple of months, and subsequent courses of antibiotics haven't been as effectiveness.

I used to more or less ignore ticks, not anymore.
Rob Parsons on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to Rich W Parker:

> A note of caution: I'm being treated for (as a precautionary measure) Lyme having being bitten on a visit to Diabaig

Ok good luck.

> The spread seems to be growing exponentially ...

I'm not sure what you mean by that.

Rich W Parker - on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to Rob Parsons:

The rate proliferation of tick and Lyme seems to be increasing.


Cheers for the well wishes.


Started a two week course of antibiotics. Chatting to the blokes in Nevisport this morning, two of whom have had it, one treated quickly and successfully, the other didn't get sorted so quickly and is having some problems.

Jez, best of luck!
elsewhere on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to jezb1:
I've done the antibiotics and I'm waiting for the blood test result.

Hopefully it was a false alarm but I doubt it as the bite matched the NHS description of "The rash is often described as looking like a bull's-eye on a dart board. The affected area of skin will be red and the edges may feel slightly raised."

See http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Lyme-disease/Pages/Introduction.aspx for a picture.
1
elsewhere on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to Rich W Parker:

My GP put me on 2 weeks then got back to me to say it had to be 4 weeks antibiotics.

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