/ Eyesight

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.
rodw - on 17 Oct 2016
Foe everyday use I wear bifocals Iam not able to wear varifocals but on the mountains I wear contact lenses. Due to reacurring eye problems I am told to stop wearing contact lenses
Glasses can be a nuisance in mist rain etc but will have to percivere I guess any suggestions please
More-On - on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:

A hat with a brim, waterproof with a good wired hood, possibly retainers if climbing/scrambling and a spare pair (or two) in the rucksack.

In winter goggles are your friend.

I appreciate these are all really obvious, but there you go...
rodw - on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to More-On:

Not so obvious to me thanks for suggestions
markAut - on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:

Mist free coating will be great while it lasts. I found plastic lenses better than glass ones.

My previous glasses had springy frames. Ok, when hit just right they could fly quite some distance, but they never bent or distorted which was good.
More-On - on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:

Cheers
I should add keeping a 'glasses only' cloth in a pocket makes dealing with rain, mist etc much easier.
Also if wearing gloves then decide ahead of time which hand is for cleaning the glasses and which is for the nose!
ian caton on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:

When raining Keep coat done up tight under chin to restrict escape of warm moist air, which condenses on cold glasses.

Hooo - on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:

I understand completely. I'd hate to have to give up contact lenses.
A good hydrophobic coating on the lenses helps, as does having thinner lenses as they warm up quicker and so don't mist for so long when going indoors.
Both of these are pricey add-ons for your lenses. So if you've got them, you then need to worry about taking care of them and not wiping continually with your glove...
I find that with the coating I can clear the rain by blowing sharply on the lenses, so saving them from being scratched by wiping. And always carry a specific glasses cloth in a case.
ScraggyGoat on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:

Other suggestions which may help: Consider getting a compass with a big magnifying glass to help read maps, or alternatively if you get memory map or similar you can print out maps at expanded scales to help reading them, spare glasses in the sack or at least in the car. Jewellers screw driver for when the frame starts coming loose, to try a prevent loosing a lens.
Moley on 17 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:

I need glasses for all map reading, blind as a bat without. A real pain carrying and putting reading glasses on and off every time I glance at my maps.

A monocle is the answer, seriously. My optician (an outdoor guy) suggested it and I thought he was taking the p***, but no, it is so much easier and faster hung round my neck. Once you have the technique of using it you won't look back (nearly a pun) and I wouldn't trek without it. Also handy for reading a menu etc. down the pub, but not designed for book reading.
ian caton on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:
Orienteering glasses.
Post edited at 08:02
Dave Perry - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to ian caton:
Amazing. Just googled them and there's some interesting glasses on there for those of a 'certain age' (me) who struggle now to read a map...
Post edited at 10:12
SouthernSteve on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave Perry:

Somewhat late to this. Running caps often have massive brims and some are cutout to avoid being too hot. This is what I use. On steep ground I find my varifocals rubbish, so just use distance glasses, and end up with the need to squint at the map. I like the monocle idea!
phizz4 - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:

2nd for orienteering glasses.
Dave Perry - on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to SouthernSteve:

But what do you wear, or how do you wear a warm hat in windy winter conditions when you've already got something with a big brim on?
SouthernSteve on 19 Oct 2016
In reply to Dave Perry:

I have a ridiculous, warm, waterproof and large brimmed unfortunately red Lowe Alpine hat for the winter and in the summer a RonHill running hat made of nylon with a velcro strap at the back which tends to mean it doesn't fall off as it traps a bit of hair even in strong winds.

The only problem really comes when you are wearing a helmet - in that situation I am stuck! Steve

ian caton on 20 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:

To read the map At night a bright head torch really helps, because the lens in the eye is at its best optical quality with a narrow aperture.
More-On - on 20 Oct 2016
In reply to SouthernSteve:

A visor buff fits neatly under a helmet for summer. Since moving to this, along with hooded tops from baselayer up, winter has also been more pleasant.
The buff is also good for use when running.
planetmarshall on 28 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:

Laser surgery. Had it done in April, best decision I ever made.
Rob Exile Ward on 28 Oct 2016
In reply to planetmarshall:

Doesn't work so well for presbyopes, i.e. people who need bifocals or variforcals. As you probably will in a few years time, laser or no laser.
planetmarshall on 28 Oct 2016
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:

> Doesn't work so well for presbyopes, i.e. people who need bifocals or variforcals. As you probably will in a few years time, laser or no laser.

Sure, but that doesn't affect my distance vision, which is what I'm concerned about when outdoors.
Simon Caldwell - on 28 Oct 2016
In reply to planetmarshall:

> Sure, but that doesn't affect my distance vision, which is what I'm concerned about when outdoors.

Just wait until you can't read a map without holding it out at arms' length ;-)
Fredt on 28 Oct 2016
In reply to rodw:

I've climbed for 45 years in glasses, UK, Scotland winter, Alps, Africa and USA, no problems.

Never had to change anything, except increasing the ventilation in ski goggles.
planetmarshall on 28 Oct 2016
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

> Just wait until you can't read a map without holding it out at arms' length ;-)

I use an app, which pre-blurs the image so that it appears in focus for presbyopes.
ads.ukclimbing.com
rodw - on 29 Oct 2016
In reply to Fredt:
Hi can you still where glasses in mist and driving rain

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.