/ Recommend me a flask

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Murderous_Crow - on 23 Nov 2016
Hi,

I'm needing a pair of good flasks for UK walking and biking expeditions during the winter. I liked these

http://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/t.php?t=653696

but I'm reluctant to blow 80 if not strictly necessary. So does anyone have any particular recommendations? They need to have a secure leak-proof lids, and keep the drinks hot for 6hrs+.

Thanks
Guy Hurst - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

The Thermos Ultimate flasks are by far the most effective and consistent I've used. Drinks are still hot inside them after 18 hours, let alone 6, and they seem very tough.
nniff - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

Size matters. Big flasks keep drinks hot for far longer than small ones. The best one I have is a very elderly Campinggaz one. If you want 'hot' buy a one litre steel flask.
benp1 - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

My favourite one is my Zojirushi, quite small but is excellent. I have quite a few flasks but find I only use the small ones with any real frequency
tjin - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

Things to look for in a good thermos is:
- Metal inside and outside (There are themos with glass insides, which can't take a small fall. Plastic means it's crappy insulated)
- Screwtop, instead of stupid quick buttons. A solid screw cap is a much better insulator. You do not gave to remove the screw cap, just half a turn to be able to poor (unless you got a really badly designed one).
- A cup/screw top that goes over the screw cap; nice to have a cup and it add insulation.
- Small screw tops are better at insulating
- The larger the volume, the less surface area to volume ratio. So big is better for insulating.
- Not much difference between fancy outdoor brands and just department stores one. Price however is a huge difference...

Cheap and cheerfull:
IKEA VOLYM (slighty bendy outside, but hey cheap and effective)
Murderous_Crow - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to everyone:

Brilliant, great replies. Some brands to research there, but just as importantly some overall features to keep in mind about resiliency and insulation.

Thanks

Luke
peachos - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

TK Maxx usually have proper Thermos branded flasks at a decent price.
86inch - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to benp1:

Agreed, Zojirushi are great, my 1L flask is 20yrs old and is still fantastic.

Hard to get hold of in the UK, but I think you can get them from Amazon.
nathan79 - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

Having bought my girlfriend a Thermos Ultimate as a gift I also sing their praises. I use a fairly cheap Thermos thermocafe that cost me a fiver and keeps stuff hot for 6hours plus. In fact 12 hours later it's usually still almost warm enough for a got drink.
Mark Westerman - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

Stanley Classic


Mine must be 20 years old and performing fine
In reply to Murderous_Crow:
Bought one from tesco for a fiver. I often drink yesterday's coffee out of it, still uncomfortably hot.
Post edited at 18:33
tspoon1981 on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

I bought a hydro flask a few weeks ago, I've used it 3 times so far, longest stretch I've tested is 12 hours and still had a hot drink. http://www.cotswoldoutdoor.com/hydro-flask-wide-mouth-32oz-flask-e6114072?id_colour=

Its also pretty bomb proof if that's something you need.
HammondR on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:
I always take 1 litre of tea with me while skiing. I have a cheap screw top steel flask from Tesco, 5 or 10 if I recall. Used for approximately 150 days, all in winter, and never had cold tea.

I can see no point in spending more than that, unless you need your drink hot for more than 10 hours.
Jim C - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to tjin:

Metal inside and outside (There are themos with glass insides, which can't take a small fall.

I wonder if the glass lined type flasks could be improved for insulation and durability properties , by opening and filling the void with expanding foam ?

Anyone tried this ?
Dave the Rave on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:
Ive still got a Tatonka 3/4 litre. It's 20 years old and is great. Unscrew a little to pour. Fairly wide necked and will take soup. Cost £20 20 or so years ago.
It's cheaper now, thanks to Brexit
http://www.googleadservices.com/pagead/aclk?sa=L&ai=CHQ1-jgM2WNG7EZS2pAPFn4KwA-KD1qxHm4C8wYYD47bjmKM...
Post edited at 21:03
tjin - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Jim C:

Filling a glass lined flask would make no real sense. A proper thermo flash should use a vacuum, which a way beter insulator than foam. Not sure if it would make the glass less likely to break.
marsbar - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Jim C:

I think the glass ones do have foam between the glass and the outside.
Jim C - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to tjin:

> Filling a glass lined flask would make no real sense. A proper thermo flash should use a vacuum, which a way beter insulator than foam. Not sure if it would make the glass less likely to break.

I am not intending to suggest compromising the double skin of the glass vacuum , I' m only thinking of filling the void between the outer skin of a glass lined flask ( usually plastic) and the outer of the glass liner. The vacuum remains intact.
marsbar - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Jim C:
I think the older ones did, when I was at school. I don't know if they still do.
May have just been the children's ones to reduce breakage.
Post edited at 21:30
Jim C - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to marsbar:
> I think the glass ones do have foam between the glass and the outside.

Not the ones I have . I looked at two in a charity shop on the weekend , no foam. ( but they were old)
Post edited at 21:34
marsbar - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Jim C:

I think maybe it was only the children's ones?
marsbar - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

I have a steel thermos which works well, no pop top. I find filling with boiling water to pre heat and then with the coffee makes it stay hot longer.
Jim C - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:
http://www.withdrake.com/blog/youve-never-heard-of-the-winner-thermal-performance-of-insulated-drink-carriers/

More for the methodology than the makes reviewed.
Post edited at 22:07
Fraser on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

I've had a few small, cheapo ones before but have found the Decathlon own brand model to be excellent.

Whichever you choose, it makes a huge difference if you prime them first (ie. fill with boiling water and closing to stand for 5 minutes) before putting in the final contents of the flask.
Murderous_Crow - on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Jim C:

Good to read someone taking an empirical data-based approach to a review!

In reply to all:

Cheers for the input, I've decided to go with 1x Zojirushi small flask, this will carry a hot drink, and will get a standard classic style one with the specs tjin mentions above from somewhere, this will be used for soup.
nniff - on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

If we're playing flask top trumps, my Camping gaz one is 32 years old. It is also hideous (top and bottom in camping gaz blue with liitle snow flakes, middle section in polished corrugated stainless steel (dented and distictly oval in section now). All set off nicely with a camping gaz blue strap. Works better than any of the numerous lesser flasks cluttering up the cupboard though.
LastBoyScout on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

I've got 2 of the Life Venture 500ml ones, no complaints so far.

Used one of them on Tuesday to carry hot water for heating baby food - one meal at lunchtime and water still hot enough to warm her tea.

As I'm sure you already know, warm the flask with hot water for a few minutes, then tip that away before filling with what you actually want to carry.
TobyA on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

I really think that all the steel vacuum flasks are much of muchness and work very well if used properly. I have a couple of 500 ml IKEA ones which were only 5 each I think, then an even cheaper 1 ltr one from Asda (on sale for 3 quid IIRC!).

Getting your drink in there as hot as possible is key. Prime the flask first, if you are making tea in tea pot, prime the tea pot first also. I always heat the milk I add as well. Basically you want the liquid going in as close to boiling as you can get it. Those cheapy flasks then easily keep drinks hot for 12 hrs. I've had piping hot tea out of the 1 ltr one 18 hrs after filling it.
GrahamD - on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to TobyA:

Have to say that is my experience. Never had a cheap flast let me down except when I've wrecked the cup or the lid.
ads.ukclimbing.com
Street - on 25 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

Another vote for the Thermos Ultimate here. Mines a bit battered now but it holds the heat very well, it was great on a trip to Norway in the depths of winter earlier this year.
iksander on 25 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

Look out for one of these at Morrisions

https://airdrierambler.wordpress.com/reviews/gear-reviews/on-the-go-flask/
gymwear on 25 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:
Primus 0.75l - ... after 6 hours drink if often still too hot ! ( mouth burning hot.. may not be seen as an advantage!) £20.00. From snow and rock.

Still pleasant to drink after 12hrs.

Jim
Post edited at 19:42
Ghastly Rubberfeet on 26 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

I'm not sure who makes them, but a train goes past my house about once a month, that has a flask on it. The contents tend to say very, very hot for about 10,000 years. Wouldn't drink from it though!
BrendanO - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to marsbar:

Plus 1 for pre-heating, I can't believe how many folk DON'T bother, then think their flask isn't good enough. I mostly use cheap (book club!) steel 1 litre.
Also, if taking soare layer or waterproof kex, I wrap rhe flask in them in rucksac: spare layer is warm when put on, or flask loses heat slower.
Jenny C on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to TobyA:

> Getting your drink in there as hot as possible is key ..................... I always heat the milk I add as well. Basically you want the liquid going in as close to boiling as you can get it.

Warming milk is a good tip which I am sure most people never think of, as a black tea/coffee drinker my flask is always noticeably hotter then the b/fs who has his drinks laced with milk.
benp1 - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

Went out for the day with the kids and the dogs. This thread spurred me on to make some (black) coffee in my little Zojirushi flask. Still steaming hot about 6 hours later (although it was in the car rather than sitting in the snow). A flash with a pouring top and a little cup means you can have many smaller cups of coffee, which in some ways is nicer than the big open topped ones (like a posh insulated mug)
ripper - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Murderous_Crow:

> Hi,

> I'm needing a pair of good flasks
> Thanks

Hip

you're welcome

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