/ Jo cox

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toad - on 23 Nov 2016
I don't care about the man who killed her.

This is inspiring. I would have loved to have met her on the hill sometime. Who knows? Maybe our paths did cross, but she comes across here as the kind of politician who was worthy of our country and parliament is lessened by her absence.

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/nov/23/jo-cox-friends-energy-for-life-was-immeasurable
GrahamD - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to toad:

It does no harm to remind people now and then that many, probably the majority, of our 650 MPs are dedicated and energetic people trying to make a positive difference.
1
Dave Garnett - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to toad:
I know that her husband and family have shown incredible dignity and have not allowed themselves to be crushed by (the entirely understandable) temptation of hatred, but the idea of that worthless fascist shit snuffing out such a selfless, tireless, principled, inspiring life, and a mother of young children, makes me furious.
Post edited at 14:59
claire14 on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to toad:

And there’s no friend who shows the slightest hint of surprise about that final act of kindness, revealed in court, of protecting her colleagues with the shout of “get away you two – let him hurt me”.

I don't know many people who would do this, really humbling.
Gordon Stainforth - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to GrahamD:

> It does no harm to remind people now and then that many, probably the majority, of our 650 MPs are dedicated and energetic people trying to make a positive difference.

... and, because they are dealing with the protagonists directly, for hours at a time, and in parliamentary debates, are in a much better position than we are to make decisions on our behalf that are in our best interests.

To think that referendums work is so similar to thinking that it's right for Joe Public to pronounce, from a position of relative ignorance, about notorious court cases, when they have not been in court for hours and hours to hear the minutiae of the evidence and arguments on both sides.
3
stevieb - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to toad:

She did seem remarkable. I remember at the time, they showed clips of Jo in parliament, and what stood out was the way she seemed to be trying to build consensus across the benches. On Syria she wanted to work with conservatives to achieve real change, rather than point score.
FesteringSore - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to toad:

I was indeed saddened when I heard of this brutal murder and, like many, find the reaction of her family inspirational.
Jim Fraser - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to toad:

There is far too much going on just now that tell disturbed individuals that it is acceptable to hate. ... ...
Pete Pozman - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to toad:

Love first... and at the last.
biped - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Gordon Stainforth:
> ... and, because they are dealing with the protagonists directly, for hours at a time, and in parliamentary debates, are in a much better position than we are to make decisions on our behalf that are in our best interests.

> To think that referendums work is so similar to thinking that it's right for Joe Public to pronounce, from a position of relative ignorance, about notorious court cases, when they have not been in court for hours and hours to hear the minutiae of the evidence and arguments on both sides.

This.



and a (_*_) to the dislikers.
Post edited at 18:06
3
Jim C - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to biped:


> and a (_*_) to the dislikers.

Maybe we need a top ten for lickers and dislikers .

Yanis Nayu - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to toad:

She seemed a genuinely wonderful person, with a great heart. Sad, sad loss to the world, and made even worse by the rise of people like Trump and Farage who work on dishonesty, division, disharmony and the promotion of hate rather than compassion.

I feel so sorry for her family, who have conducted themselves with incredible dignity.
biped - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Jim C:

The anonymity would have to be lifted, which I'd be in favour of. I think a moon/bum button with a (_*_) symbol should be added to the options too
1
biped - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to Yanis Nayu:

> She seemed a genuinely wonderful person, with a great heart. Sad, sad loss to the world, and made even worse by the rise of people like Trump and Farage who work on dishonesty, division, disharmony and the promotion of hate rather than compassion.

> I feel so sorry for her family, who have conducted themselves with incredible dignity.

It is difficult to imagine a better example of how we could aspire to be than Brendan Cox.

I'm not as good as him, I still boil with anger when I think of Jo Cox juxtaposed with that venomous shit Farage, that bastard who flew a plane towing a Vote Leave banner over her memorial vigil in London when Brendan Cox was speaking, the unashamed apologists for Thomas Mair (poor lonely unemployed gardener) and his ilk, and the credence that is paid to the far right's arrogance and callousness in the press and in society. Rant over.
3
Bulls Crack - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to GrahamD:

Sadly, mine's a brown-nosing, self-serving twunt of the first order
FactorXXX - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to biped:

I still boil with anger when I think of Jo Cox juxtaposed with that venomous shit Farage, that bastard who flew a plane towing a Vote Leave banner over her memorial vigil in London when Brendan Cox was speaking

Was the plane actually anything to do with Farage?
1
biped - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to FactorXXX:

I didn't say it was. In any case, no, it was from a light aircraft company. They claimed they had no idea that Cox's service was ongoing, which I don't buy. Christ I live 400 miles away so major road closures in London are not really on my radar but I still knew about it.
3
Mick Ward - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to claire14:

> And there’s no friend who shows the slightest hint of surprise about that final act of kindness, revealed in court, of protecting her colleagues with the shout of “get away you two – let him hurt me”.


> I don't know many people who would do this, really humbling.

I guess if you've passed all previous litmus tests of humanity, this is the final one.

To mix metaphors, you can't put the bar any higher.

She passed. And paid for it with her life.

Which says something terribly important - to all of us - in these very strange times.

Mick



Gerry_Doncaster - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to biped:

> It is difficult to imagine a better example of how we could aspire to be than Brendan Cox.

If anybody deserves a gong in the New Year's honours list it's Brendan Cox.

5
FactorXXX - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to biped:

I didn't say it was.

Apologies, I misread what you wrote.
claire14 on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Mick Ward:

Good definition of love really, the life of another comes before your own.
ads.ukclimbing.com
alastairmac - on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to toad:

After Thomas Mair was jailed for murdering Jo Cox yesterday most papers chose to run the story on their front pages. Except the Daily Mail, which published it on page 30.

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