/ Criminalising Homelessness

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The Ice Doctor - on 23 Nov 2016
Richard Sudan is suggesting this will soon happen.

Do you think this move is reasonable in British society?
5
bouldery bits - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to The Ice Doctor:

Yeah, and whilst they're at it make being unemployed, poor or stupid illegal too.

Death penalty's too good for 'em.

(This post was bought to you by sarcasm, in association with being humane)
1
abseil on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to The Ice Doctor:

> Richard Sudan is suggesting this will soon happen.... Do you think this move is reasonable in British society?

No, it's horrifying and mind boggling, if true. But I read Richard Sudan's article, and I cannot quite see what crime homeless people are to be charged with - could you please say or explain? Thanks very much.
baron - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to The Ice Doctor:
I'm not sure about the term 'homelessness'
I did see a news article about rough sleepers in a city, can't remember which one, where I was dismayed at the idea of people living rough.
I did toy with the idea that councils should have the power/duty to 'round up' rough sleepers and feed, clothe and accomodate them.
But the more I thought about it the more difficulties I could see.


Big Ger - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to The Ice Doctor:

A link would help.
Big Ger - on 23 Nov 2016
In reply to The Ice Doctor:
Don't worry, I found the article, it claims the govt will make being homeless illegal, but offers no proof.


"Richard Sudan is a London-based writer, political activist, and performance poet. "

I hope his poetry is better than his political sloganeering.
Post edited at 22:59
1
Chris Harris - on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Big Ger:


> "Richard Sudan is a London-based twunt "

Fixed that for you.


Lenin on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to The Ice Doctor:

It is already a concept regarding immigration within the social sciences, the term for that is Crimmigration.
Is making homeless people criminals good, an emphatic no.
If a homeless person moved into your garden shed, would you leave them to it, or call the police.
It all seems so simple, but it always gets complex
Lemony - on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Lenin:
> If a homeless person moved into your garden shed, would you leave them to it, or call the police.

I'd probably ask them if they could give me a hand disposing of the 300kg of compost sacks and half a wendy house left behind by the previous tenant. It's not even like we have any flower beds just a couple of planters and a potted herb garden. Madness!
Post edited at 11:55
Lusk - on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Lemony:

> I'd probably ask them if they could give me a hand disposing of the 300kg of compost sacks

Grow yourself some mushrooms or 'tomatoes'.
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damhan-allaidh on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Lenin:
Sorry - that's just reminded me of Ed Byrne's routine on why we like cats more than people.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YoaVGuHfbg

Agree - it seems simple, just give people shelter. I used to live in a community of homeless young men. Useful lessons learned in just how complex. Having a roof over one's head is only a start.

When I was teaching I told the children about an experience I had on North Bridge in Edinburgh (in front of the Pizza Hut, for anyone that knows the area) about 20 years ago. A persistently homeless friend of mine (really, really complex) was begging. Without even thinking I sat down to pass the time of day with him. The abuse was phenomenal. I remember how horrible it felt sitting on ground, looking up at people, having them look down on you. Regardless of the nastiness they heaped on you, just feeling literally looked down upon was demoralising enough. I made the half the class sit on the floor while the other half just stood over them. Judging by the reactions and discussions, I think they were a little more empathetic next time they went into the city. Maybe some politicians and civil servants should try it, too.
Post edited at 16:54

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