/ Muslims march against ISIS in Iraq,media blackout?

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Timmd on 24 Nov 2016
Lusk - on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Timmd:

Arbaeen Procession.
It's an annual event, why should it be news?
A quick google shows reports about previous year's London one.
MarkJH - on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Timmd:

Have you read the article?

More accurately: Millions of Muslims have taken part in an annual religious observance which commemorates an event that, in the mind of the author, has some similarities to modern events. He even goes so far as to state that "several people took the controversial step of turning their march political in order to denounce terror in all forms marchers".

It is interesting, but by no stretch of the imagination is it international news.
Post edited at 12:33
Timmd on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to MarkJH:
Why would Muslims protesting against a film in a country overseas is thought by the BBC to be news worthy here, while the event in my OP seemingly isn't?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/search?q=muslims%20march

It strikes me they're equally in/significant, in terms of effecting our lives here in the UK.
Post edited at 12:42
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JayPee630 - on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Timmd:
What are you suggesting, that there's some concerted 'cover-up' in the media of things like this? (And it's barely news to be honest.)

BTW that 'news' website is terrible. Shoddy journalism and reporting. If that's independent journalism I'd rather the BBC.
Post edited at 12:42
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Timmd on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to JayPee630:

No cover up, no.
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MarkJH - on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Timmd:

> Why would Muslims protesting against a film in a country overseas is thought by the BBC to be news worthy here, while the event in my OP seemingly isn't?

Because a protest is more newsworthy than an annual religious observance. In the examples that you link to, they are almost all either UK domestic protests, or specific responses to current political events that would (or could) have had significant consequences in important regional powers.

Coverage of a religious observance is the kind of thing that might be interesting to read about in the magazine pages as a culturally informative article, possibly with a commentary about regional politics, but there is nothing there that warrants a place in the news pages.
Timmd on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to MarkJH:
> Because a protest is more newsworthy than an annual religious observance. In the examples that you link to, they are almost all either UK domestic protests, or specific responses to current political events that would (or could) have had significant consequences in important regional powers.

> Coverage of a religious observance is the kind of thing that might be interesting to read about in the magazine pages as a culturally informative article, possibly with a commentary about regional politics, but there is nothing there that warrants a place in the news pages.

That's a well thought through reply. I guess it depends on what one sees as news. With how the BBC can seem to have a range of stories which it decides is news, from protests and world events, to the occasional 'good feeling' story which doesn't impact on anybody's life except for who is being mentioned, within the context of there being a (quite understandable) fearful reaction towards the rise of Islamist terrorism, causing people to withdraw one might say, it struck me as being newsworthy, from seeing part of the role of news broadcasters (within the limits of being one) as giving as wide a perspective on groups which frequently appear in the news as possible, to aim to avoid what may arguably be a one sided narrative developing. Which, where Muslims are concerned, can currently seem to be one of 'Muslims, threatening us, bombs, extremism, otherness...', making me see a religious occasion which has taken on the significance for those involved as also being a form of protest against ISIS, as something which is newsworthy to people in the west.

I take your point about the difference between 'news' and 'cultural interest' however.

My use of 'media blackout' was a poor choice.
Post edited at 13:36
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TobyA on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Timmd:

An awful lot of coverage of Arbaeen in various mainstream press sources if you search for it https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=Arbaeen&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b&gfe_rd=...

The independent has this article http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/20-million-muslims-march-against-isis-arbaeen-pi... for instance.

That Mint Press News website was in the middle of some scandal some years back - I remember looking them up as a result, annoyed now as I can't remember what it was all about. But this story is more editorial than story. Arbaeen is a Shia celebration that has been targetted brutally down the years by al Qaeda and now ISIS because it is Shia.
Timmd on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to TobyA:
That's interesting to know. Quite widely covered except for the BBC.

It does read like an opinion piece, but I think it's newsworthy too, given current world events.
Post edited at 18:39
TobyA on 24 Nov 2016
In reply to Timmd:

It was just on the 6 oclock radio 4 news because of the truck bombing of leaving pilgrims.
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winhill - on 25 Nov 2016
In reply to Timmd:

It's hardly News that Muslims in Iraq oppose ISIS is it?

I'm not sure who some people think ISIS have been fighting against.

Buzzfeed nailed it yesterday, along with the question who or what is the American Herald Tribune:

https://www.buzzfeed.com/craigsilverman/facebook-trending-just-promoted-a-misleading-story-about-a-m
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