/ That cloud inversion on saturday.

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Somerset swede basher - on 28 Nov 2016
I'm sure that everyone in the Peak must have been as impressed as I was about the views on Saturday. I'm guessing next week's top 10 photos will be flooded with pictures of it.

Where did you get the best view of it?

We got some great views on the moors above Chatsworth but the best photos I've seen from friends were taken from Stanage. Mam Tor must have been a good vantage point but ive not seen any photos taken from there yet.
Trangia - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Somerset swede basher:

Would you care to post a link to your photos of it on here?

Thanks in advance.
thommi - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Somerset swede basher:

I was up on kinder, was beautiful as the sun came up on the way up. got a couple of photos on my phone but nothing amazing (it being a phone and not a camera). was lovely on top as well, very very still...
Mowglee on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Somerset swede basher:

Decided not to take my camera as it looked a bit grim from Sheffield in the morning. Got a few phone snaps though:

http://imgur.com/a/0ULH4

Rob Morgan on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Somerset swede basher:

There was an inversion in the Brecon Beacons too, amazing day: http://imgur.com/a/QeeHd

deepsoup - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Mowglee:
I missed it completely. D'Oh! Various friends have put some nice photos on FB etc., but there are surprisingly few on here so far.


> Got a few phone snaps though

Nice. I particularly like this one: http://i.imgur.com/XXxgEZO.jpg
(Stick it in your gallery on here, g'wan. I'll give it a 5.)

edit: oops - wrong link.
Post edited at 13:22
TheDrunkenBakers - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Somerset swede basher:

I was up on the tops over Howden reservoir looking back to the ridge and the inversion. Stunning pretty much all day.
Somerset swede basher - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Trangia:

I didn't take any as was walking with my dad who took loads on his fancy camera. Unfortunately he doesn't acknowledge the existence of 'the internet' so will have to wait until Christmas when I see him again before I can get a copy of them.
SenzuBean - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Somerset swede basher:

Was pretty nice in the Brecon Beacons indeed: http://i.imgur.com/iJYfLP1.jpg
thommi - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to thommi:

Couple of photos in my gallery now...
Bulls Crack - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to thommi:

one in mine too from Calderdale
thommi - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Bulls Crack:

Very nice indeed.
thommi - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to thommi:

Why would anyone thumbs down me about this? The mind boggles....
Rog Wilko on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Somerset swede basher:

Cloud inversion? How can you tell the clouds are upside down?
Somerset swede basher - on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Did I mean temperature inversion? Are they the same thing or have I made up a term?
Rog Wilko on 28 Nov 2016
In reply to Somerset swede basher:

> Did I mean temperature inversion? Are they the same thing or have I made up a term?

I think so, to both. I think what you are seeing is the top of a thick layer of fog which persists because the inversion of temperature prevents its lifting. In still clear conditions mainly in the winter cold air collects in the valleys and the warmer air rises above it by convection. The fog then forms as the cold air reaches saturation. So it isn't really cloud in the normal sense of the word.
However, the term cloud inversion is quite a useful shorthand if incorrect scientifically, and it has gained considerable currency especially on ukc.
Rog Wilko on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Rog Wilko:

Why is my post offensive?
hang_about - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to deepsoup:


> Nice. I particularly like this one: http://i.imgur.com/XXxgEZO.jpg

Gorillas in the mist?




deepsoup - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to hang_about:

Chimps in the haze? Baboons in the brume!
andy farnell - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Rog Wilko: It wasn't. Well, in a normal world it isn't, but we are in post-truth, post-fact brexit Britain.

Andy F

Tim Harper - on 30 Nov 2016
I was on Bamford Edge on Saturday, superb conditions with excellent views and only us and 1 other group on the crag! Defiantly regretted not taking my camera once the clouds cleared above the crag but got some good photos on my phone, the best ones in my gallery.

One of the best days I've had on grit this year for sure!

brianjcooper on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Tim Harper:
Stunning photo Tim. We had walked the ridges via Margery Hill and beyond Outside Edge. The views looking back down the reservoirs were equally awesome. Wished we had taken our cameras with us.
Post edited at 16:14
deepsoup - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Tim Harper:
Wow. Stunning!
ScottTalbot on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Rog Wilko:

It's not offensive, just overly pedantic. This has been commonly known as a cloud inversion for as long as I can remember. In fact, I've never heard it called a temperature inversion in photography circles. Hence 1 thumb down. :-P
davidalcock - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to ScottTalbot:

Always been called a temperature inversion in my experience. Cloud inversion is a new one on me. Is it an informal name, like 'sea of clouds'? Whatever you want to call it, it is a temperature inversion that causes the phenomenon.
Rog Wilko on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to ScottTalbot:
> It's not offensive, just overly pedantic.

Sorry, must be getting above myself. Personally, I prefer to understand things as they actually are. That nice Mr Gove said something about this kind of thing d.uring the referendum campaign (not that I'm suggesting I'm an expert or anything). ;O)
Btw, agree Tim's picture is great!
Post edited at 00:45
deepsoup - on 17:33 Thu
In reply to Rog Wilko:
> Tim's picture is great!

In the same spirit of pedantry, it's a great picture featuring a temperature inversion but it's not a picture of a temperature inversion because the human eye can't see the temperature of the air, or convection currents within it directly: a temperature inversion is invisible.

In order to see one, there needs to be something in the air that makes the convection (or lack of it) visible. Smoke would do. Or, as in Tim's picture, water vapour that has condensed out into a mass of tiny airborne droplets of water - that is what makes the inversion visible.

Now, what's a good snappy name for a big fluffy looking aerosol of tiny airborne water droplets dominating a landscape? One that, but for the inversion going on, would be much higher in the air. Hmm...
Rog Wilko on 16:18 Fri
In reply to deepsoup:
> In the same spirit of pedantry, it's a great picture featuring a temperature inversion but it's not a picture of a temperature inversion because the human eye can't see the temperature of the air, or convection currents within it directly: a temperature inversion is invisible.

Can't argue with that.

> Now, what's a good snappy name for a big fluffy looking aerosol of tiny airborne water droplets dominating a landscape? One that, but for the inversion going on, would be much higher in the air. Hmm...

Fog? Valley fog?
I expect if you'd been driving down the Derwent Valley you might have made a comment about the thick gloomy fog. ;O)
Post edited at 16:20
deepsoup - on 18:51 Fri
In reply to Rog Wilko:
> Fog? Valley Fog?

In an inversion - what would you call that then? Inversion fog? <googles>

https://www.britannica.com/science/fog#ref111043
"Inversion fogs are formed as a result of a downward extension of a layer of stratus cloud, situated under the base of a low-level temperature inversion."

Ah yes, "Inversion Fog" is indeed a thing. Consisting of a layer of cloud. ;-)
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The Lemming - on 19:27 Fri

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