/ Anyone ever made their own bacon?

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Chris Harris - on 29 Nov 2016
As per the topic title. Decent dry cure bacon costs a bomb, so I thought I might have a crack at making my own.

Any hints/tips/things to avoid?

Cheers

Chris
1
Bimble on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Chris Harris:

I make my own as I buy whole pigs from the farmer next door and butcher them myself.
Bacon is easy enough to make, but be careful you don't make it too salty. I use a Coleman coolbox with the drainage plug on the bottom, layer it the pork up after rubbing it with curing salt and drain the liquid off each day/turn & re-layer the meat.

Weischenfelder is good for curing equipment.
MonkeyPuzzle - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Bimble:

I did a chunk of pork belly and it came out very salty indeed. It was easily sorted by soaking cut rashers in water for a few minutes before cooking, but I'd prefer to avoid that next time. How do you gauge the right amount to be slapping on?
Hugh J - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Chris Harris:

I have been making bacon with Mrs J for years without anyone telling us how to.

Perhaps you should just give it a go? It might come naturally to you.
Chris Harris - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Hugh J:

Me too.
Hugh J - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Chris Harris:

> Me too.

Really? . . . . just wait until she gets home !!!!!
Indy - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Chris Harris:

There are some excellent YouTube vids on the subject.... take your pick.
Phil Payne - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Chris Harris:
I can recommend the River Cottage handbook no13. Loads of excellent recipes and ideas for curing and smoking all kinds of things. They also have a youtube series with loads of excellent video tutorials.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hEGwYvyIyhI

Post edited at 20:01
Pedro50 on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Hugh J:

> I have been making bacon with Mrs J for years without anyone telling us how to.

Pulled pork for me

Ben Sharp - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Chris Harris:
I've done the river cottage one a few times (from the meat book which is a great book) but I prefered doing wet cure for ease and taste. The easiest way to do it is just to stick the belly in a big freezer bag with the salt and leave it in the fridge however long you want then rinse and tie up tightly then hang in muslin (or smoke) to dry it. Add salt peter to keep it pink which you can get from butchery places online.

If you want it less salty then just do it for less time, it wont last as long but it'll probably still last a lot longer than shop bought bacon and you can always freeze half of it.

Home made bacon does taste more like salty pork than the bacon we're used to buying in the shops imo.

P.S. credit goes to this guy for the bag method - http://www.thefoodinmybeard.com/recipe/homemade-pancetta/
Post edited at 20:38
1
Chris Harris - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Ben Sharp:

> The easiest way to do it is just to stick the belly in a big freezer bag with the salt and leave it in the fridge however long you want

Thanks to everyone for their comments. In relation to the above point - what would be the typical time range (max/min) you would be looking at?





birdie num num - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to Chris Harris:

I believe David Cameron had a crack at making some
Hugh J - on 29 Nov 2016
In reply to birdie num num:

> I believe David Cameron had a crack at making some

I think technically that may have been a spit-roast!
Ben Sharp - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Chris Harris:

I haven't experimented that much but given peoples comments on saltiness I would try 4 days and then don't forget to hang it for about the same, at least a couple of days in a cool place and smoking would be preferable (cold smoking). You could cure it for 10 days and it would keep for ages but it would probably be too salty for most people without pre-soaking.

I guess the whole idea is that you can slaughter a pig then preserve the meat for months without refridgeration, if you're going to eat it quite quickly (which you will!) and it's going to live in the fridge then the salting becomes more of a taste thing and I don't see a lot of benefit in a long curing process.

Also when you cook it make sure you strain the fat out of the pan and save it, you don't want to waste that golden nectar of salty pork fat for frying things in.
1
Dorchester on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Pedro50:

> Pulled pork for me

Good with Jerk sauce.....
mkean - on 30 Nov 2016
In reply to Ben Sharp:

Saltpeter (potassium nitrate) is also available to order from Boots or was a couple of years ago. They'll ask you why you need it as it does have less socially acceptable uses than curing meat.
GregCHF - on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to Chris Harris:

You can use celery to cure bacon. Celery powder contains the same chemicals that are usually found in cured bacon.

https://www.chemistryworld.com/opinion/wholesome-additions/9624.article
thedatastream on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to Chris Harris:

"Food DIY" by Tim Hayward has some notes on making bacon as well as other "manly" food pursuits like smoking etc

It also has a recipie for bacon jam which i must try at some point
Toerag - on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to mkean:

> Saltpeter (potassium nitrate) is also available to order from Boots or was a couple of years ago. They'll ask you why you need it as it does have less socially acceptable uses than curing meat.

Who on earth is going to tell them they want to use it to make a bomb?!
Chris Harris - on 01 Dec 2016
In reply to Toerag:

> Who on earth is going to tell them they want to use it to make a bomb?!

Presumably the same people who say "No, I didn't pack this suitcase myself".
cb294 - on 02 Dec 2016
In reply to thedatastream:

BACON JAM?

Now that sounds "manly"!

CB
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MonkeyPuzzle - on 02 Dec 2016
In reply to cb294:

It's one of the more painful climbing moves.

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