Cullernose Point

Climbs 21 – Rocktype Dolerite – Altitude ? – Faces S

Crag features
A dangerous crag, with dodgy rock and lots of seagulls.

Single pitch routes. Nesting restrictions April till August.

Access notes
On the coast 1.5 km south of Craster. The crag is visible from the road. Parking for about six cars in a small layby opposite an emergency telephone box
Read more... Regional Access notes are available from the BMC.

Guidebooks
Northumberland Climbing Guide (2004),
Out of print: Northumberland (1989)

Climbs at this crag

Sort climbs
 Climb nameGrade
1Original RouteVS 4c *6
2The RampVD *3
3Craster CornerVS 4c *5
Volunteer to moderate Cullernose Point
We rely on volunteers to moderate their local crags. You would check updates and approve climbs added to the database. It's a very easy job, and all you need is a guidebook and an hour or two each month. [ read more ]

USER FEEDBACKLogin as Existing User to add your comments
Having read in "Where to climb in the british isles" by Edward C. Pyatt, that Cullernose Point is ""one of the finest of England's sea-cliffs - from the climbers point of view." I thought it would be worth checking out, having looked on here I don't think I will bother!
ablackett - 15/Nov/10
That description is accurate. I know because I wrote it. This crag should be removed as even the best routes are unclimable now without an unaccptable level of birdnest removal.
JDal - 17/May/10
General: This is one of only two sea cliffs in Northumberland with recorded climbing. Both have a tendency to drop routes into the sea, and neither are very satisfactory venues. Cullernose has had a well earned reputation for being a serious crag, with steep routes on rock of doubtful quality. Lack of traffic and severe winter storms have not improved the situation and the crag is, in part, in a dangerous condition. The crag is now a home for a large Kittiwake colony and considerably more birds nest here than in previous years and is really only in condition after winter storms have cleaned off the bird muck and before the nesting starts up again. The south facing aspect of the crag means that if the wind is off the land, conditions in early spring can be quite pleasant. There has been much rockfall at the eastern (seaward) end of the crag, so the routes here may no longer exist.
peter pan - 28/Oct/08
Do you have more up to date information?

These details were last updated on 20/Feb/2013
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Newcastle Upon Tyne, TYNE & WEAR
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