UKC

PODCAST: Factor Two - Episode 1: Becoming the Master

In this new podcast series, Wil Treasure shares stories from the climbing world through interviews with both well-known and lesser-known characters. In-depth, personal accounts that aren't read from a page on a variety of themes. Settle down with a cuppa and have a listen...

Episode 1: James McHaffie and Jerry Moffatt talk about their differing experiences on Master's Wall, Clogwyn Du'r Arddu.


Every generation of climbers looks to improve on the performances of the last. The saga of the Great Wall on Clogwyn Du'r Arddu provides one of the best examples of this in British climbing. The climbers aimed to improve the style and the difficulty of the lines: Joe Brown abandoned his efforts with a peg at his high point. Pete Crew surpassed it using pebbles for aid in the thin cracks of the top pitch. A young John Allen freed the line in 1974.

In the early 80s the eyes of the best were drawn a little rightwards - the new line would eventually become Dawes' masterpiece Indian Face, but before that John Redhead famously tumbled from its upper reaches. He marked his highpoint with a bolt.

Jerry Moffatt was making a name for himself as a bold and strong climber. He inspected the line and, offended by the bolt, chopped it and headed rightwards to create Master's Wall, one of the boldest and hardest routes around at the time. The next step in this progression? To onsight the line. In 2000 a 19-year-old James McHaffie attempted the feat. It's an experience which has lived with him ever since.



Forums (24 comments)

no argument on that, both Enormocast and Jam Crack can be somewhat interviewer heavy and i get a bit frustrated with Kalous's long winded questions, but you get to know him as part of the podcast and his character as...
Go along with this, but to a point. I've really enjoyed the enormocast and jamcrack, but sometimes I would like to hear more of the interviewee's. The skillful editing ensured the voices of Caff and Jerry really came...
listened to it, and enjoyed that, great stories well told. super high production values, felt like listening to the BBC. For me though i prefer podcasts a little bit rough and ready, like im having a chat with them...
As C Witter says... I trained as a Print Journalist and did a very small amount of training in radio/TV. I've not written much in the last few years though. Most of my experience of putting together things like this...
Jerry's perspective is more or less the same, we talked about his day at Stoney too - totally unjustifiable to him now, but at the time just something he was compelled to do. I expect most climbers have a similar tale...
That was a really great podcast. A fantastic insight into an iconic wall in British climbing history that gave me sweaty palms. And from two legends of British climbing. The E1 title also confused me until I realised. ...

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