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cycling bibs

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Seriously what sick **** designed such a thing? why? lol. just bought some with the idea that padding good, may be not having my shorts migrate south and show arse crack also good. Until i put them on......dear me.

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 Run_Ross_Run 19 May 2020
In reply to andrew breckill:

Have you accidentally put them on back to front? 

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 Siward 20 May 2020
In reply to andrew breckill:

Stupid things, whatever cyclists say

NOTHING wrong with shorts

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 1philjones1 20 May 2020
In reply to andrew breckill:

Have you actually ridden in them yet? In my experience the well designed ones tend to feel uncomfortable and too short in the body until you’re on the bike and over the hoods. Then they feel fine. 

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In reply to andrew breckill:

Rather depends on whether you've got good ones or not. I gave them a try for my commute as it is reasonably long (15 miles) and I like to do it as quick as poss. Wouldn't go back by choice.

The quality of pad and comfort/fit can vary hugely. Like a lot of clothing. They look a bit odd when you put them on but you can't tell them from normal shorts as part of a full outfit.

Given that every pro cyclist uses them there must be something good there.

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 Sans-Plan 20 May 2020
In reply to andrew breckill:

They won’t be in the slightest but comfortable standing up in your bedroom, they are cut and designed to be in a cycling position, give them a try.

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 Rigid Raider 20 May 2020
In reply to andrew breckill:

They are better than plain shorts because they stay up, keep your midrift warm and hold your belly in. The only downside is when you need to stop for a tinkle, or worse, a full sit-down.

My favourite item of cycle clothing is my 3/4 bibs with Roubaix lining, that's a fluffy lining to keep the thigh muscles warm so they are an excellent choice for in-between seasons. A good brand is dhb from Wiggle. 

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 Richard Horn 20 May 2020
In reply to andrew breckill:

Did you try them on before buying? Sizing is notoriously different between brands - for Italian brands such as Castelli or Ale, I am XL pushing XXL for shorts, whereas for say DHB I am just large, and have even got medium size for one pair I think (cant remember the brand). Some pairs of shorts have tighter shoulder straps than others.

One thing not obvious when you buy bibs for the first time is how easy it is to take a leak - some bibs have a very low front cut (e.g. Castelli velocissimo) making it a doddle , some much higher which means pulling them down is a bit of struggle and inevitably leads to a bit of pressure release dribble after you have finished. 

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 GrahamD 20 May 2020
In reply to Siward:

> Stupid things, whatever cyclists say

As a convert to using bibs, I still have to agree they are about the most ludicrous looking bits of kit I own.

> NOTHING wrong with shorts

Not much wrong except for the tendency to leave a gap in the back and, surprisingly,  less cool when it's hot due to the need for a tighter waist band.

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In reply to GrahamD:

> As a convert to using bibs, I still have to agree they are about the most ludicrous looking bits of kit I own.

please refrain from going for rides in just your bibs in future! 😉

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 nniff 20 May 2020
In reply to andrew breckill:

For the full oddball look, heart rate monitor, bib shorts and arm warmers before your jersey goes on.

Castelli Italian sizing is bonkers - think short T-Rex - big thighs, no chest or arms and short. Large jerseys, XL shorts.  Sportful is the same as Castelli (same firm). Assos (Swiss) is sensible -  I'm medium.  Stolen Goat (UK - actually Belgian (Bioracer) medium.  I'm 6 feet tall, climber's build, 32 inch waist, 11st 6

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In reply to andrew breckill:

haha, they are not uncomfortable, and they do work as advertised, just not a good look when you are pushing 16st (i have really let myself go) wont be out in them for long enough for a while for he toilet thing to be an issue. If i went out wearing just them i would be arrested.

p.s. they are alpkit and seem decent quality for the price.

Post edited at 09:29
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 Fredt 20 May 2020
In reply to andrew breckill:

What do The Rules say?

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In reply to andrew breckill:

More seriously, for most of my cycling I wear some "baggies" (although they aren't actually very baggy at all) over my bibs. I feel less self conscious when riding into work, or if going into a shop of cafe (not currently obviously) whilst out on a ride, and the pockets on them are actually really useful.

I've just bought a second pair of moderately expensive Decathlon ones (30 quid) because the first pair I had have been so good - better than all the other baggy over shorts I tried. https://www.decathlon.co.uk/st900-mountain-bike-shorts-black-id_8381758.html Sometimes I wear them over my best bib shorts (as I did on Saturday when I did a long ride - for me at least - 110 kms mainly off tarmac). Other times I wear them over just some basic cheapy liner shorts, if I'm just riding the 40 minutes to work. 

Basically some over shorts in stretchy synthetic material are highly recommended if you feel self conscious in just lycra. I think Alpkit do a pair although their cycling kit whilst I'm sure great isn't actually that cheap compared to where I tend to get my cycling kit.

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 Siward 20 May 2020
In reply to andrew breckill:

Maybe try these?

https://tinyurl.com/y8z79uqu

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 Jon Greengrass 20 May 2020
In reply to TobyA:

A few years ago I went to a resort in Fuerteventura that did guided MTB tours every day, I packed a pair of bibshorts and my baggies. The majority of the guests who went on the mtb tours were German,  dressed head to toe in lycra, many in SPD shoes they had taken with them. There I was in a pair of trainers and baggies so the first day I guess they assumed that I was a beginner I said hello but they didn't really chat much. On the second day having seen me drop them on every downhill and race them to the top of every hill they realized that I was a regular MTBer like them and the conversation moved from my limited German into English and we had a good chat about the types of riding we were used to. Later in the ride one rode along side and questioned why I was wearing baggies over my bibshorts, because all the cyclists in Germany wore only lcyra. I explained that it was usual in the UK for MTBers as it helps keeps thighs warm in the colder, wetter, windier weather, gives more protection from cuts and grazes in the event of a crash and suggested mostly because the British are quite prudish, preferring not to see grown men bulging out of their shorts. He got the cultural differences but continued his questioning " but, you know what about down below, don't you get problems?" I replied no its quite comfortable, in a hushed voice he asked further " are you not worried about the rubbing fabrics on tender areas leading to hemorrhoids?"  I assured him no it was quite comfortable.

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In reply to Jon Greengrass:

Thanks for the link to baggies Toby A, I have ordered a pair.

Post edited at 12:37
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In reply to TobyA:

Baggy shorts on a decent road bike are on a par with socks and sandals. Looks sh1t, totally pointless and acheives sweet FA another than making you look like a total numpty.

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In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

> Baggy shorts on a decent road bike are on a par with socks and sandals. Looks sh1t, totally pointless and acheives sweet FA another than making you look like a total numpty.

But you don't mind if it's a cheap road bike? 

If it matters to you that much, you'll be relieved to know I generally don't wear over shorts when I'm riding my road bike. But I do when I'm riding my gravel bike (which is probably about 75% of my bike time) or my mountain bike.

If you see someone riding a decent bike but with baggy shorts do you share your opinion with them or just silently judge them? ;-) 

More seriously, isn't it just nice to see people out enjoying having a ride regardless of whether they are wearing matching team strip down to their socks and with their sun-glass arms over their helmet straps (of course), or whether they are in some old tracky bottoms and wearing socks and sandals?

It's like people getting Nomics for their first season of irregular Scottish routes. They don't need them, but if they are out enjoying their grade II gully, it's no skin off my nose.

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 Rigid Raider 20 May 2020
In reply to andrew breckill:

When I started mountain biking in 1988 the only kit we had was walking gear and things like Ron Hill Tracksters. Then we moved into lycra and it was normal to ride in full roadie kit until the current uniform of mountain bike baggies became common. When I moved from mountain biking to the road I quickly discovered that anything flappy was irritating and you seemed to go faster in tight lycra, which didn't get hitched up as you dismounted and gave the best compromise in allowing you to sweat while keeping the wind off. 

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 ianstevens 20 May 2020
In reply to nniff:

> For the full oddball look, heart rate monitor, bib shorts and arm warmers before your jersey goes on.

> Castelli Italian sizing is bonkers - think short T-Rex - big thighs, no chest or arms and short. Large jerseys, XL shorts.  Sportful is the same as Castelli (same firm). Assos (Swiss) is sensible -  I'm medium.  Stolen Goat (UK - actually Belgian (Bioracer) medium.  I'm 6 feet tall, climber's build, 32 inch waist, 11st 6

Agreed here - Castelli sizing really is tailored to the cyclist shape! Only thing I have ever needed a medium or even a large to fit in (for contrast even my Le Col speed suit is a small...)

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In reply to nniff:

> For the full oddball look, heart rate monitor, bib shorts and arm warmers before your jersey goes on.

You're missing legwarmers before bibshorts !!!

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 GrahamD 20 May 2020
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

> You're missing legwarmers before bibshorts !!!

Hopefully not until autumn now.

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 GrahamD 20 May 2020
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

No socks and sandals ??? There goes another bedrock 

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L Arthur Parkin 20 May 2020
In reply to andrew breckill:

Not all bib-shorts - "bib-knicks" in Australian parlance, which is even funnier - are created equal. I never scrimp in this (ahem) tender area. A pair that fit well and will last years (without losing fit) will cost north of £100. The well known brands - Assos, Castelli, Santini, etc - all have a wide choice and some of the newer boutique labels - e.g. Rapha, MAAP - are truly gorgeous bits of kit.

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 climbingpixie 20 May 2020
In reply to Richard Horn:

> One thing not obvious when you buy bibs for the first time is how easy it is to take a leak- some bibs have a very low front cut (e.g. Castelli velocissimo) making it a doddle , some much higher which means pulling them down is a bit of struggle and inevitably leads to a bit of pressure release dribble after you have finished. 

At least you're not a woman - having to remove your entire top half to go for a wee is not uncommon. Not too bad in the summer but in cooler weather it can be quite unpleasant! Assos have tried to address this with a bib that unfastens at the front and goes over your head but, alas, the years of climbing have not been kind to my shoulder flexibility and though I can remove them this way I can't put them back on. Not too bad when wearing a full zip top but an absolute ballache on a long ride in a half zip, back pockets bulging with food, repair kit etc. I discovered this having stopped for a wee just around Appletreewick on a solo ride from Leeds to Ulverston, though thankfully a kind gentleman on his own ride stopped to ask if I needed help and ended up with his hand down my back pulling my bib up for me!

ETA - that said, bibs are far and away more comfortable than normal shorts so I persist in wearing them despite the logistical difficulties they present. I just make sure I save my half zip tops for short rides. Like Toby, I have some nice lightweight baggies to go over them for MTB as they seem better at avoiding abrasion (and so the other MTBers don't laugh at my roadie ways).

Post edited at 14:50
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In reply to climbingpixie:

Pixie!

Post edited at 16:10
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In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

Wow, i am glad you moderated your opinion on this matter. I have a decent road bike and have been known to ride it WEARING MY JEANS!, if i was feeling serious the ronhills were worn, with no clips! 

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 nniff 20 May 2020
In reply to yesbutnobutyesbut:

> You're missing legwarmers before bibshorts !!!

Not an image that i care to dwell upon......

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In reply to Rigid Raider:

> They are better than plain shorts because they stay up, keep your midrift warm and hold your belly in. 

I've heard these comments on plenty of discussion on bibs, so I guess there must be some truth in them, but I don't get it myself. When wearing a cycling top my shorts waistband is never exposed, my shorts never slip down and I find my lower back gets too warm/sweaty with bib shorts/jersey.

Guess this last point could be addressed with lower cut bib shorts, but then your in danger of exposing your lower back again if this is an issue for you.

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 John2 20 May 2020
In reply to climbingpixie:

If you worked on your shoulder flexibility it would help you not only with your cycling bibs but also with your climbing.

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In reply to TobyA:

He just said it looks sh*t Not that the people were! I guess if you are going to spend serious money on a bike then the cost of bibshorts are not an issue, and one would assume they will be doing long rides so comfort is important hence the use of bibshorts. If I go for a long ride I will use bibshorts but if cycling to go the climbing wall I will wear my climbing shorts or moon pants.

Post edited at 17:39
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In reply to RX-78: interesting how these topics pan out, to say it looks shit is a matter of ones opinion. I am all for comfort and just had a quick half hour run out in cargo shorts me nuts were numb half way into ride. So I will be getting some padded shorts for quick run arounds.

Going to try and get a ride in everday as i have 4 stone of fat to shift.

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 petegunn 20 May 2020
In reply to Rigid Raider:

I always think its funny as when I go to a trail centre, I'm still head to toe in lycra as that's what I'm used to (competed in cross country in my teens/early 20s) and I always think it's strange why a lot of riders wear so much baggy clothing as well as all the knee pads, shin guards, elbow pads etc. 

I will have to try out these baggies and see what it's all about! Lol

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In reply to petegunn:

My mate gave me a pair of knee/shin guards a couple of years ago. For mountain biking I love them! Fortunately I've not needed to find out how well they work in a big crash, but in winter they keep your legs warmer if you are wearing shorts and where I ride the biggest plus is you can ride through brambles and nettles over hanging the trail with less "ouch!!" issues!

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 Rip van Winkle 21 May 2020
In reply to Richard Horn:

Bibs? Yes! But I won't buy online again, only after trying them on in a shop. My favourite pair are by Endura and are a few years old. I bought another pair online (Wiggle, I think). Same size, same model number, only to find the fit is quite different. Guy in the bike shop says Endura changed their sizing and style a couple or so years ago without telling the trade or the public and they only found out when people started bringing them back.

Last autumn I tried on some bib longs from Castelli. They were obviously designed for someone with a completely different body shape to me - they didn't fit anywhere! At the same time I tried a pair from Specialized which fit perfectly and are brilliant.

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In reply to andrew breckill:

I used to wear them when riding all the time. They were comfy but hell to have a waz in. Years ago I had just started descending Cadair Idris on my mountain bike when I clocked my crotch on the saddle. For some reason it made me immediately need to wee so I leapt off my bike and got myself into the ridiculous contortion needed to pee whilst wearing bibs. Naturally, exactly half-way through relieving myself Mr and Mrs Hiker came around the rock I was behind and just stared at me. I could only scowl back and carry on emtying my bladder, hunched up like some mutant insect.

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In reply to petegunn:

You can take a tumble in baggies, slide on your backside and not end up back at the trail head with your red raw arse hanging out!

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