UKC

/ Rohloff or pinion

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artif on 10 Jul 2018

Bored of brexit, how about an equally divisive thread

Not interested derailers

Any one have experience of Rohloff, Pinion or Nuvinci (especially interested in Rohloff vs Pinion experience). Off-road preferably, no stiff-back whining about about a couple of grams weight penalty (its not important).

cb294 - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to artif:

I just sold my steel framed Rohloff bike, as it was just a bit too heavy for my tastes and my current daily 4 km uphill commute. That was largely due to the frame, but the Rohloff hub is quite heavy, too, to the extent that you "feel" the inertia of the rear wheel, even if you do not care about the overall weight. The Rohloff hub also has some internal friction loss, so that it feels a bit more sluggish than a derailleur, but that difference disappears once you get enough dirt on your derailleur. I have ridden a Pinion bike only once, so cannot really compare these two.

That said, while commuting in the flat the Rohloff hub has been ideal, as it is virtually indestructible, especially with the "external" shifter (the "direct" version can be a bit fiddly to adjust especially in the field): Over the course of seven years I changed the hub oil twice, otherwise I had no repairs or maintenance at all, despite cycling through Euro winters with snow and salt on the roads and tons of grit in the cycle paths (cleaning of chain and cogs not included...)

Rohloff gear spacings are absolutely linear and it is easy to shift under load if you have to, but depending on the handlebar you want to use the standard Rohloff grip shift could be a pain. 

CB

 

edit: Don't even think about the Shimano versions....

Post edited at 17:19
nniff - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to artif:

Old school.  What you need is a Ceramic Speed Driven - 99% efficient, but not yet available other than as a shiny thing at a trade show.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFAQ6CzNm7s

 

artif on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to nniff:

Pretty but useless for off-road, still has big rings and exposed components and how do you route it through suspension pivots etc 

cb294 - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to nniff:

I want one of these beauties!

CB

nniff - on 10 Jul 2018
In reply to artif:

If you want to go off road, get a horse ;o)

Post edited at 18:21
thepodge on 10 Jul 2018

I'd probably go Pinion as the weight is more central. 

I've never ridden either of them but I have run an alfine and loved that... Though it's currently for sale .

Toby_W on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to nniff:

Shut up and take my money

Cheers

Toby

jkarran - on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to nniff:

> Old school.  What you need is a Ceramic Speed Driven - 99% efficient, but not yet available other than as a shiny thing at a trade show.

He's not quite right saying it eliminates sliding friction but it comes close and it does look pretty cool. I'd worry about the longevity of the ball-bearing units particularly with concern for the side forces which are imposed by the meshing of circular and linear tooth paths. And of course it's hardly a bolt -on upgrade, it requires a cleverly engineered frame to accommodate the mechanism and resist the unusual loads it applies. I like it, it's a very old idea (lantern pinions with rolling pins in tower clocks are centuries old) applied to a modern problem.

jk

artif on 11 Jul 2018
In reply to nniff:

F*** that, a friend currently spends more per month on the upkeep of her horses, (2 of) 1 of which she can't even ride, than I do on rent and bills of a 3 bed house in Kent. 

They don't like being thrown in the back of car either, and try getting one on a train/plane.

nniff - on 12 Jul 2018
In reply to artif:

> F*** that, a friend currently spends more per month on the upkeep of her horses, (2 of) 1 of which she can't even ride, than I do on rent and bills of a 3 bed house in Kent. 

Horses that can't be ridden, or are simply not ridden, are known in the trade as 'lawn ornaments', which is a splendid phrase

 


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