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Cromlech boulders graffitied?

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 cambromo 18 Sep 2020

Just heard the cromlech boulders roadside boulder has been graffitied somewhere within the last 2 days with “wales not 4 sale”

Has anyone gone past who can confirm?

 jezb1 18 Sep 2020
In reply to cambromo:

It's true

("Wales is not 4 sale")

Post edited at 20:12
In reply to cambromo:

Drove past an hour or so back and saw something although was going the wrong way to read it. It’s big though. 

 David Lanceley 18 Sep 2020
In reply to ChristianTyroll:

picture on this public Facebook group

Cefnogwyr Cymdeithas yr Iaith

In reply to cambromo:

Yep, Banksy has lowered his game...


4
 profitofdoom 18 Sep 2020
In reply to David Lanceley:

> picture on this public Facebook group

> Cefnogwyr Cymdeithas yr Iaith

Thanks. The letters are pretty big, aren't they. And an eyesore. What does "WALES IS NOT 4 SALE" mean to the writers, though? Is is anti people buying second homes in Wales, or what?

 Luke90 18 Sep 2020
In reply to profitofdoom:

> What does "WALES IS NOT 4 SALE" mean to the writers, though? Is is anti people buying second homes in Wales, or what?

Yes, mostly that according to the comments I've seen on Facebook.

https://facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=125472419273234&id=101270965026713

Post edited at 21:11
1
 profitofdoom 18 Sep 2020
In reply to Luke90:

> Yes, mostly that according to the comments I've seen on Facebook.

OK, and thanks for your reply, Luke

 john_mx 18 Sep 2020
In reply to Luke90:

It’s crazy how they have said “wales is not for sale”

yet they are letting people buy second homes there so it is technically it is for sale.. 🤔

I agree locals should have priority over everyone but I know welsh locals that have second homes out side of wales in the UK in popular tourist spots so it works both ways I guess 

Post edited at 21:27
15
In reply to john_mx:

It doesn't go both ways for less rich locals in Wales, particularly younger people who never had a chance to get on the housing ladder. Plenty of boomers have made a packet out of property speculation at the expense of the next generation, who are now being priced out by people from the south east of England who are only in their houses for a few weeks a year.

14
 john_mx 18 Sep 2020
In reply to pancakeandchips:

I Agee it is not fair on them, 

A good mate of mine grow up in Kensington in London and works in a shop on NMW how is he ever going to get on the ladder..

it is happening all over the UK not just Wales

Post edited at 21:52
1
 mrphilipoldham 18 Sep 2020
In reply to cambromo:

Same colour as all the chalk at least tho.

2
In reply to mrphilipoldham:

Maybe it was just a lucky game of join the dots. 

3
 Myfyr Tomos 18 Sep 2020
In reply to cambromo:

Things have changed dramatically since lockdown. Houses are being bought, not as holiday accommodation but as homes to live and work from. Anywhere away from the main urban areas are fair game, money no object. Name your price and you'll get it - the market, I know, but so sad for local people wanting to get a home where they grew up. 

2
In reply to Myfyr Tomos:

It is sad but its not just Wales. Its anywhere pretty. 

The thing is its the people living in these areas that are selling the houses. You can spount off about Wales is not for sale as much as you like but when it's Welsh people selling their houses to in comers from the south east it obviously is for sale. 

3
In reply to cambromo:

Come home to a real fire. 

6
 Si dH 19 Sep 2020
In reply to Myfyr Tomos:

I know this is scant consolation to existing younger locals in the immediate term but, if houses are now being bought ar high prices to be lived in full time rather than as second homes, that's surely a really good thing for the community over a longer period. Those new residents will start to contribute to the local economy, society etc, their kids might grow up there and feel like that is their home. For some places that were previously struggling to survive as young people moved away for work and didn't return, surely this is lifeline.?

Post edited at 08:23
4
In reply to Si dH:

Unfortunately the vast majority never have the curtesy to learn Welsh and thus dilute and distort the culture.  This dilution has a significant impact. 

18

I'm not sure what the problem is if people are going to live in them. Presumably they go for the market rate?

Covid has made businesses realise that remote working can actually work, so if it removes some of the london centricness of the housing market then all the better I think. Remember there are plenty of locals in the south east who can't afford a house there - if they can in Wales, and want to live and pay taxes there, all the better in my view.

1
 Chris_Mellor 19 Sep 2020
In reply to cambromo:

Second home? Weekend use? That would be me with a 1-room bolt hole near Betws y Coed. No fortune made from property speculation. Just bought it from savings. We bought from a local owner via a local estate agency; both being happy to sell to a someone from near London and so two Welsh people involved in the sale.

As I drive to/from the Beacon climbing wall I pass climbing club huts and the owners of them too have bought houses that are now denied to the locals and not used full-time. Are climbing clubs with huts in Wales to be regarded as second home owners? And the MBA with two bothies in Snowdonia? British education authorities bought grander homes in N Wales and turned them into outdoor education centres. Second home ownership on a larger scale too perhaps?

6
 Mr Lopez 19 Sep 2020
In reply to pancakeandchips:

Hardly a unique Welsh situation. All over the country the younger generations have been priced out due to exhorbitant housing price inflation. Only difference is here you blame "those outsiders form the SE" instead of your fellow countrymen who are the ones selling the houses to people "not from round'ere" with inflated prices which are beyond the reach of the younger population, locals or not.

If the Welsh want to have 'Welsh houses for Welsh people" all they have to do is to set the prices to what is reasonable and affordable, rather than trying to squeeze as much profit as they can to houses they inherited or bought for peanuts between the 1960's and 1980's.

Despite what our esteemed leaders would have you believe, you can't have your cake and eat it

3
In reply to Mr Lopez:

Yep. I live in the SE and blame the oligarchs.

 robate 19 Sep 2020
In reply to cambromo:

Welsh is my first language, was brought up in N Wales and have been climbing on the boulders most of my life..

Regardless of the rights and wrongs of the economy I think defacing the rock in this way is a deeply offensive and vulgar act.

1
In reply to featuresforfeet:

Actually, that's not true. I blame the successive governments that did nothing to stop the worlds 'elite' dragging up prices to the point of madness, but drifting off topic here.

4
In reply to cambromo:

Inaccurate.

Everything's for sale.

Even my Nan. Thatcher won. Innit.

1
 LucaC 19 Sep 2020
In reply to bouldery bits:

Si has already reposted my picture from Friday. It must have happened overnight on Thursday as it wasn’t there the day before, but the paint was dry by 10:30am Friday.

It’s thick white gloss and all over the holds. I know one local has already been down to see how easily it comes off (it doesn’t). 
 

There’s some ‘interesting’ Facebook comments on the north wales climbing page; from legitimate concerns about second homes to outright racism. 

1
 string arms 19 Sep 2020
In reply to robate:

Last time this happen it was written in black. There are better platforms to voice political/ socioeconomic views than to daub something in an area of outstanding natural beauty. It only ignites hostility.

1
In reply to LucaC:

Is it legit to chip it off?

Asking for a friend

In reply to Mr Lopez:

I think you misread my comment. I was blaming the older generation, not outsiders. And whilst it's not a situation that's unique to Wales, there is a twist on it here (as I'm sure there is in other rural beauty spots) in that a lot of the houses go as second homes or holiday lets rather than as homes occupied year round by people who make an active contribution to community life. 

Anyway, I'm not Welsh, I'm English living, working and renting in Wales, so in some people's eyes I'm part of the problem.

 Mr Lopez 20 Sep 2020
In reply to pancakeandchips:

Fair enough. I did misunderstand your post or more likely just got carried away with my ranting  

Post edited at 12:30

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