/ 1st ever electronic record?

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aln 12 Feb 2020

It seems widely accepted that Son of My Father by Chicory Tip was the 1st single to feature a synthesizer. The duo Silver Apples made electronic music in the 60's and released an album in 1968, but they had live drumming. What was the 1st record released that featured music that was fully electronic? 

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Doug 12 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

I had a record (a single on floppy plastic rather than vinyl) of electronic music back in the late 60s which was free with a copy of Practical Wireless. There were also pieces of music from the BBC's radiophonic workshop dating back to the early 60s or maybe earlier (eg the Dr Who theme) but don't know if any where released as records at the time. There were also several 'modern classical' composers (maybe not the best term) working on electronic music in the 60s

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Iamgregp 12 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

Is there an early Theremin record that features only the Theremin?  If so I reckon that could be the one?

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Doug 12 Feb 2020
In reply to Iamgregp:

see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electronic_music , much depends on which definition of 'electronic music' you use. The wikipedia page seems to concentrate on composition & performance rather than recordings so doesn't quite answer your question

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Flinticus 12 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

Very quick research indicates the first such release to be The Fascinating World of Electronic Music, released 1959

https://www.discogs.com/Tom-Dissevelt-Kid-Baltan-The-Fascinating-World-Of-Electronic-Music/release/2961095

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Doug 12 Feb 2020
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Iamgregp 12 Feb 2020
In reply to Flinticus:

No, whilst that's described as "arguably the first electronic pop record ever made" it's not the first all electronic music ever recorded.

That's why I was thinking about the Theremin, that's been around since the early 20th century, there must be an early solo recording knocking about?  

EDIT: Does this count?   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5qf9O6c20o 

Post edited at 14:56
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Tony the Blade 12 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

Wasn't George McCrae's hit Rock Your Baby the first electronic record? Or was the the first drum machine?

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Iamgregp 12 Feb 2020
In reply to Tony the Blade:

An early drum machine record (Roland??) but features conventional instruments (as well as voice) so not fully electronic.

Off topic a bit but I believe Rip It Up by Orange Juice was one of the first singles (probably the first that charted) to use the Roland 303.  Weirdly, it was used as was originally intended as a bass synth... It was a few years before people learnt to turn the LFOs up and make the thing scream!

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Eric9Points 12 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

> It seems widely accepted that Son of My Father by Chicory Tip was the 1st single to feature a synthesizer.

What did Telstar use?

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Flinticus 12 Feb 2020
In reply to Iamgregp:

The question of the OP's is what's the first ever record released...not simply music recorded

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Iamgregp 12 Feb 2020
In reply to Flinticus:

No, he wants to know what was the first record that featured only electronic instrumentation (hence discounting the Silver Apples as they had live drumming).

That's why I'm wondering if it's a Theremin solo record as they were invented so early.

The first record released, i.e. the first music recorded would be way, way before that - 1860 google reckons.

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Doug 12 Feb 2020
In reply to Eric9Points:

according to wikipedia it featured a Clavioline,  an early  form of synthesiser, alongside guitars, bass & drums

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aln 12 Feb 2020
In reply to Iamgregp:

> No, he wants to know what was the first record that featured only electronic instrumentation

That's exactly what I'm looking for. The contribution from Flinticus was interesting though, looks like an album worth hearing.

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aln 12 Feb 2020
In reply to Eric9Points:

Interesting. For the 1st use of a synthesizer that seems to beat Chicory Tip by 10 years.

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Iamgregp 12 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

Yeah that does sound good that album, hadn't heard of it before...

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Simon Caldwell 12 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

This was released on LP in 1957, but I would be surprised if there weren't something else earlier that decade.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4QaMwpVXVM

Post edited at 16:46
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louiswain 12 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

It's broadly accepted that the first work of electronic music is Halim El-Dabh's The Expression of Zaar (c.1944) which predates Schaeffer's musique concrete by a few years. This is a recording of a public exorcism ('Zaar') subsequently processed, rather than being synthesised. The Studio für elektronische Musik in Cologne opened in the early 1950s, and this is regarded as being the most important centre for 'pure' electronic music.

Institutional electronic music really begins with Schaeffer's Etude aux chemins de fer, which was broadcast by Radiodiffusion Française (RDF) in 1948.

It's interesting to note that after Wagner's Tannhäuser was performed in Paris in 1861, music was 'reimagined' with some pretty incredible and ridiculous electrical musical instruments in some of the popular French comic journals of the late nineteenth century.

Post edited at 16:52
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deepsoup 12 Feb 2020
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

> This was released on LP in 1957, but I would be surprised if there weren't something else earlier that decade.

The Forbidden Planet (1956) was, I believe, the first feature film with a wholly electronic score.  (Shakespeare in space, Robbie the robot, monsters from the id etc., cracking film!) 

I don't suppose they did, but if any of the sound track was released as a record that might qualify?

The score was quite Stockhausen-y iirc, but with the addition of a fair bit of noodling on a Theremin.

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Eric9Points 12 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

> Interesting. For the 1st use of a synthesizer that seems to beat Chicory Tip by 10 years.

I was thinking that.

Is there a prize involved in this quiz?

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Bobling 12 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

First ever good electronic record?   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nm-ISatLDG0 Donna Summer, I feel Love.  Sorry for brow-lowering.  Good track but.

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Iamgregp 13 Feb 2020
In reply to Bobling:

Yeah absolute banger

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wercat 14 Feb 2020
In reply to Doug:

>  Practical Wireless

those were the days!

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wercat 14 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

We were played some electronic/computer music in lessons about 1965 - some of it sounded like the futuristic music played in the opening titles of the puppet TV show "Space Patrol" which was brilliant and rather creepy at times

FC Judd, also well known in Practical Wireless was featured in the credits, also well known in Practical Wireless

Post edited at 12:40
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deepsoup 14 Feb 2020
In reply to wercat:

Oh come on, you can't talk about 1960's kid's TV without a hat tip to Delia Derbyshire!  It's practically the law.  (Or it should be.) 

I know it's a horrible cliche, but if you haven't listened to it in a while:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75V4ClJZME4
No synthesizers, just samples and loops manipulated with razor blades and sticky tape and still superior to the 2020 version imo.

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aln 14 Feb 2020
In reply to louiswain:

Really interesting post, thanks. 

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FactorXXX 14 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

'Getting Away with It' was the first ever Electronic record.

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aln 14 Feb 2020
In reply to FactorXXX:

Well done! They were great, I liked the 1st album a lot.

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krikoman 14 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

Rolf and his Stylophone

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ena sharples 15 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

Not sure what, if anything, came of this but interesting none the less-http://120years.net/the-free-music-machinepercy-grainger-burnett-crossusaaustralia1948-2/

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wercat 15 Feb 2020
In reply to deepsoup:

of course, but iirc space patrol might have been a little earlier

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jim robertson 18 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

Thats a coincidence. This morning I was listening to a lathe cut 12" reissue of Silver Apples "Oscillations" with an Andy Weatherall remix of "The Edge Of Wonder" on the B side. It has lino cut artwork by Simeon Coxe and Weatherall as the sleeve. 

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MonkeyPuzzle 18 Feb 2020
In reply to aln:

As an aside, DJ Shadow - Endtroducing was allegedly the first ever album entirely constructed from samples.

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Simon Caldwell 18 Feb 2020
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

> As an aside, DJ Shadow - Endtroducing was allegedly the first ever album entirely constructed from samples.

Preceded by several years by John Oswald's Plunderphonics.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plunderphonics

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In reply to aln:

This was on my A level music syllabus back in the day...

In 1964 Stockhausen composed MIXTUR (MIXTURE) for orchestra, 4 sine-wave generators and 4 ring modulators, work number 16. 

This is just analogue rather than sampled. 

I think Switched on Bach was all Moog synthesisers in 1968.

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Iamgregp 18 Feb 2020
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

He admitted that there's a couple of non-sampled bits here and there, I think it's still something like 90% samples though.

Amazing album though.

Post edited at 13:39
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