Johnny Marr

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.

Is bigger than Hendrix

Not in a literal sense, Hendrix was 1.8M and Marr is 1.73M

But his tunes are more 'hummable' and that goes a long way imo

 Tom V 03 Jan 2021
In reply to Phantom Disliker:

Not  heard of Johnny Marr but you're probably right., I never saw my school mates walking round carrying a "Humalong With Hendrix " LP under their arms.

 felt 03 Jan 2021
In reply to Tom V:

I know which tune I like to hum when I'm aiming for a cadence of 90, and the first word is Foxy not Heaven and the last is Lady not Now.

In reply to Tom V:

You're right - I'm missing the point, I might as well compare a volkswagen beetle with an ocelot

 Ceiriog Chris 03 Jan 2021
In reply to Phantom Disliker:

Andy Rourke drove the Smiths 

In reply to Ceiriog Chris:

Have you heard any of Marr's fairly recent output? Easy Money is really hummable.

 Ceiriog Chris 03 Jan 2021
In reply to Phantom Disliker:

I like the Electronic stuff he did, quite hummable and the closest to dance music that I will probably ever enjoy at my age 

 Lankyman 03 Jan 2021
In reply to Phantom Disliker:

> Is bigger than Hendrix

> Not in a literal sense, Hendrix was 1.8M and Marr is 1.73M

> But his tunes are more 'hummable' and that goes a long way imo


Hendrix was the man who opened the door to a lot of what came after. A true innovator. I think Marr is/was one as well but not perhaps to the same degree. Other innovators of the electric guitar? There are many of course but for me, one of the true greats was Eddie Van Halen and his 'brown sound'. When their first LP came out it was obvious that something special had just landed. Spawned a whole host of imitators and 'shredders'.

 ripper 03 Jan 2021
In reply to Phantom Disliker:

My lad has a Man City shirt from the 'Aguerroooo!' title winning season, signed after the game by Yaya You're..... and Johnny Marr, who was also there

In reply to Phantom Disliker:

I bet these days he feels like a dick for starting a band with the Nigel Farage of indy pop.

In reply to Jon Stewart:

Morrissey is certainly not right in the mind however Marr transcends indy pop thankfully.

 Hat Dude 03 Jan 2021
In reply to Phantom Disliker:

Nicked his whole guitar sound from the marvellous Tony (T.S.)  McPhee of the mighty Groundhogs ;-)

from 1972

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KdJa0JZwzRw&

 Myfyr Tomos 03 Jan 2021
In reply to Phantom Disliker:

Thought Marr could have given Boris a harder time this morning though...

 felt 05 Jan 2021
In reply to Hat Dude:

Excellent.

Sounds like the Happy Mondays did a bit of borrowing from them too, when they'd had enough of ripping off Jaki Liebezeit rhythms.

In reply to Lankyman:

EVH for sure, and a complete next level (or two) up from 60s and early 70s guitarists. I’m reading a collection of interviews with EVH at the moment, and the one inspirational guitarist he talks about more than anyone else was Alan Holdsworth. Saw VH on their first U.K. tour supporting Sabbath and they pretty well played the first album, brilliant.

Johnny Marr was a real innovator following the Smiths mantra of no rock or blues cliches, and I think he came up with something individual and new. Hendrix had worked hard, and the Marshall/Fuzz Face/Dunlop Wah/Strat sound combination is iconic. Controversially I prefer Rory Gallagher or SRV and am prepared to take abuse for it....
 

...of course apart from EVH, Holdsworth, Mcgloughlin, Vai and a few others, it seems they all should have tried a bit harder when you listen to Joe Pass, Wes Montgomery etc😂

 coinneach 06 Jan 2021
In reply to Tom V:

Not heard of Johnny Marr?

He’s the guitar player from the second most over rated band ever!

 Lankyman 06 Jan 2021
In reply to paul__in_sheffield:

> EVH for sure, and a complete next level (or two) up from 60s and early 70s guitarists. I’m reading a collection of interviews with EVH at the moment, and the one inspirational guitarist he talks about more than anyone else was Alan Holdsworth. Saw VH on their first U.K. tour supporting Sabbath and they pretty well played the first album, brilliant.

I'll have to look Mr Holdsworth up. I saw VH on their first headlining tour here and they were having a bad night. Poor sound quality (booze/drugs?) spoilt the gig. I got the first couple of albums then left them behind until the Van Hagar era and bought a couple more. Recently I've been dipping into the Roth era post VH2. I particularly like the Fair Warning album, especially the tracks Unchained and Hear About it Later. If there was a museum for guitar riffs they'd be prize exhibits. Where did I put my air guitar ..... ?

In reply to Lankyman:

If you haven’t already heard it, it’s worth picking up the 1st Montrose album, with A very young Sammy Hagar on vocals and produced by Ted Templeman. It’s the template for Van Halen and has tracks which Sammy still plays now with Joe Satriani and Chickenfoot.

Alan Holdsworth was a jazz fusion player so can be a bit challenging at first. He had a spell with a commercially successful outfit called Asia which might be easiest. However, dip your toe in with this, the guitar improv is at the end, but it’s worth watching it all for brilliant musicians at the top of their game.....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yll1FS-YcT0&

 Lankyman 06 Jan 2021
In reply to paul__in_sheffield:

> If you haven’t already heard it, it’s worth picking up the 1st Montrose album, with A very young Sammy Hagar on vocals and produced by Ted Templeman. It’s the template for Van Halen and has tracks which Sammy still plays now with Joe Satriani and Chickenfoot.

Yes, I had that album - Space Station 5, what a great track! Not one to play when travelling down the open road. Impossible not to break the speed limit!

> Alan Holdsworth was a jazz fusion player so can be a bit challenging at first. He had a spell with a commercially successful outfit called Asia which might be easiest. However, dip your toe in with this, the guitar improv is at the end, but it’s worth watching it all for brilliant musicians at the top of their game.....

Thanks for that. I can certainly see the Van Halen in his soloing style. I actually thought the drum intro was going to break into Rock and Roll (Led Zep!). What EVH could do in spades were the blistering solos and the thundering riffs as a rhythm player. He was the complete package. A very under-rated guitarist who I've been checking up on recently is Frank Marino. I think his version of 'All Along the Watchtower' is amazing. He actually 'out-Hendrix's' Hendrix in my opinion.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PtP3w1JQoEw&

Shredding before it was invented!

 Co1in H 28 Jan 2021
In reply to Hat Dude:

Groundhogs! What a band. Saw them many times in the late sixties and seventies.

Could do with them around now. "Who will save the world? The Mighty Groundhogs"

In reply to Hat Dude:

> Nicked his whole guitar sound from the marvellous Tony (T.S.)  McPhee of the mighty Groundhogs ;-)

> from 1972

I think he was well into a wide range of music and a veritable sponge for guitar influences. I remember reading that he was well into Steely Dan but tended to down play that in interviews with the NME

 graeme jackson 29 Jan 2021
In reply to paul__in_sheffield:

Alan Holdsworth was a jazz fusion player so can be a bit challenging at first. He had a spell with a commercially successful outfit called Asia which might be easiest.

I don't believe Allan ever played in Asia. perhaps you're thinking of Steve Howe?  Holdsworth did a spell with Bruford and UK but is mostly known for his rather superb solo works.  

In reply to Phantom Disliker:

> But his tunes are more 'hummable' and that goes a long way imo

Really?  I thought that Marr explicitly avoided anything that was in danger of turning into a melody when he was in the Smiths.  It was a point of honour.  Morrisey had a natural advantage in this regard of course.

If it was a competition as to how many Hendrix or Smiths tunes I could pick out on a guitar from memory, Hendrix would definitely win.  Of course, some of Hendrix's most memorable tunes weren't written by him. 

In reply to graeme jackson:

Course it was, I meant U.K., thanks for that. I was led that way as being a massive King Crimson fan, especially the Wetton Era Larks Tongues, Red, Starless.

 keith hal 14 Feb 2021
In reply to paul__in_sheffield:

I think Holdsworth also played in Tony Williams second incarnation of Lifetime. 

Tony was a bit of a fusion trailblazer as well...you can really hear the way his playing was going on the later Miles Davis quintet stuff especially. A massive influence on pretty much all of the drummers that followed especially Vinnie Coliauta...who also played with Holdsworth!

Post edited at 16:30
In reply to keith hal:

Ah, Vinnie. One of my favourite drummers. Great work with Zappa, and his more recent stuff with Jeff Beck has been outstanding

In reply to paul__in_sheffield:

> Johnny Marr was a real innovator following the Smiths mantra of no rock or blues cliches, and I think he came up with something individual and new. Hendrix had worked hard, and the Marshall/Fuzz Face/Dunlop Wah/Strat sound combination is iconic. Controversially I prefer Rory Gallagher or SRV and am prepared to take abuse for it....

Rory was of course a huge influence on a young Johhny Marr. He even set his guitar on fire to make it look worn and beat up like Rory's strat.

 keith hal 15 Feb 2021
In reply to paul__in_sheffield:

Yup!

Theres Vinnie...then everyone else

Arguably the most technically gifted , exciting , and versatile player in the world.

 Iamgregp 15 Feb 2021
In reply to keith hal:

Funny way to spell Buddy Rich ;)

 keith hal 15 Feb 2021
In reply to Iamgregp:

Good answer!! Saw him with his band in 79/80and 81. Buddy and Neil Peart were my first big drum heroes. ( Closely followed by Gadd/Max Roach and Tony Williams)

Post edited at 15:40
 Iamgregp 15 Feb 2021
In reply to keith hal:

Not so familiar with Neal Peart but I know his name is always mentioned in the run down of top drummers.

For Rock stuff John Bonham's my favourite, I just love the way he played total grooves underneath the rest of the band.  Always sounded really simple but then when you listen to it there's all sorts of complex stuff going on.  Sometime his drums aren't even in the same time signature as the rest of the music.... That's clever stuff that.

In reply to keith hal:

> Yup!

> Theres Vinnie...then everyone else

> Arguably the most technically gifted , exciting , and versatile player in the world.

Zappa selected the best for his bands, an addition the Vinnie, Chad Wackerman e fed up doing brilliant work with Holdsworth, Terry Bozzio...then there’s Steve Vai of course

 yer maw 17 Feb 2021
In reply to Phantom Disliker:Marr’s autobiography is well worth a read. However he sits on the fence a bit.

 sandrow 17 Feb 2021
In reply to Phantom Disliker:

Horses for courses - I rate them both!

EVH - yawn inducing twiddle-twaddle...


Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.
Loading Notifications...