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/ What are you reading?

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Bjartur i Sumarhus on 15 May 2018

Me? ..... The Valley of Unknowing - Philip Sington

Bought secondhand after stumbling across a glowing review on-line. 100 pages in and so far its excellent. Characters are well developed, the main protagonist and narrator, Bruno Krug, can be very amusing in a dry way. It's set in Eastern Germany in the 80's, Bruno is an author who has had some decent success but is struggling to write a sequel to his acclaimed novel. Then a manuscript is presented to him by his publisher untitled and with no authors name. He reads it and realises it is the sequel to his book and it is brilliant. It is also potentially political dynamite in the DDR and the following events turn the story into a real page turner .  I would categorize it as noir fiction bordering on thriller. Hope it continues in same vein to the end. 

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/15858303-the-valley-of-unknowing

Post edited at 11:12
JJ Krammerhead III - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

'Waterlog' by Roger Deakin - and this summer am going to swim a lot!

Have 'Wild wood' on order by same author, the writing is perfect.

Tall Clare - on 15 May 2018
In reply to JJ Krammerhead III:

I loved Waterlog. I'm currently reading Turning by Jessica J. Lee, another in the recent swathe of wild swimming memoirs. She managed to write this one, about swimming in the lakes round Berlin, whilst also doing her PhD - christ knows how one manages that. Hopefully this summer I'll finally try open water swimming for myself.

DenzelLN - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

No Country For Old Men - McCarthy, Good read but difficult at times. I get out of breath in my head from reading his stuff!

Re-reading Misha Glenny's, McMafia.

Trangia on 15 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

"The English Civil War" by Dianne Purkiss, with very many thanks to those of you in UKC who recommended it to me.

A really interesting and enlightening read. 

Big Ger - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

"A little White Death"  by John Lawton.

pneame on 15 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

The Red Sparrow Trilogy (Jason Mathews - ex CIA) interesting trade craft in the new cold war. Recommended by James Comey (in the New York Times, I think), of all people. 

Each chapter ends with a sketchy little recipe of something that was eaten in the previous chapter, which is an entertaining diversion. 

paul__in_sheffield - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

Adaptive Learning of Polynomial Networks

 Nikolaev and Bae

 

don’t ask.....

Andy Johnson - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

Pattern Recognition by William Gibson. Near-future sci-fi from fifteen years ago. Have read it before but not for some time.

Enlightenment Now by Steven Pinker. Good stuff, but my inner misanthrope keeps fighting back against the relentless carpet bombing of good news.

No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy. Current audiobook for my commute. Unabridged version narrated by Tom Stechschulte, who has a great voice.

Some tech books about machine learning and linear algebra.

Post edited at 17:02
Blue Straggler - on 16 May 2018
In reply to pneame:

> The Red Sparrow Trilogy (Jason Mathews - ex CIA) interesting trade craft in the new cold war. Recommended by James Comey (in the New York Times, I think), of all people. 

Hopefully better than the aimless and dreary film adaptation. Do all the books feature different protagonists or is it all Dominika? I got the impression from the film that her story was finished with and that there might indeed be a larger tapestry of tales, IF there were more (I didn't know that it was based on a book series at the time I sat through it)

 

Blue Straggler - on 16 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

We Are Completely Beside Ourselves, by Karen Joy Fowler.

Picked up fairly randomly from the book-donation-swap shelf at my local independent cinema. A shelf that contains 80% pulp (bad chick-lit, worse autobiographies etc) but which does throw up the occasional interesting-looking thing. Had never heard of it nor the author (who turns out to be famous for this and for The Jane Austen Book Club).

Enjoyable book so far, I am about 2/3 of the way through (not been making time to read in the past two weeks, sadly), being so far mostly the childhood reminiscences and college-year reminiscences of a 40-year-old woman. I know that doesn't sound very appealing but it is really engaging and Fowler has an very strong writing style with some superbly efficient phrasing and a nice "breaking the fourth wall" trick where the character, writing in first person, addresses you the reader, to acknowledge that she's done stuff such as deliberately withholding a key bit of information until a certain point in the narrative. I like that, as it always annoys me in written and cinema fiction, when "tension" is falsely created simply by hiding something that ALL CHARACTERS know, from the audience.

OllieBarker - on 16 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

Just finished reading Jerry Moffatt's autobiography called Revelations. Would highly recommend, gives a fantastic insight into his rise through the ranks and the attitude he and many others took to climbing in ye olden days.

jess13 - on 16 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

Just finished Ken Follett's The Pillars of the Earth- a good long pageturner. Started on Yuval Noah Harari's- Sapiens A Brief History of Humankind so far very readable.

subtle on 16 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

The Butterfly Lion by Michael Morpurgo

An attempt to get the boy to read more means I am also reading his books to enable discussions on plot etc.

Bjartur i Sumarhus on 16 May 2018
In reply to jess13:

I really enjoyed Pillars of the Earth. I have World without End on the book shelf, but have never picked it up (other than buying it). It's size makes me shudder and I think it's destined to join me on a trekking trip rather than a nightly half hour before lights out.

pneame on 16 May 2018
In reply to Blue Straggler:

Not seen the film - but it doesn't seem to be a book that would go in that direction anyway. Amazon reviewers seem to feel that the book is a lot better than the film. It (the book) can get a bit repetitive - but it is an enjoyable read (into the second ATM). It does seem to be all Dominika and "what a nasty piece of work Putin is" - so it feeds nicely into my personal echo chamber. 

Bobling - on 16 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

The Forgotten Soldier - Guy Sajer.  I've read it before but not for many years, interesting to see how my reaction to it changes with my age.  It's by a Frenchman who volunteered for the Wehrmacht and experienced fighting on the Eastern Front, eventually joining the Grossdeutschland SS Division.  Tragic.

Lost Lanes West - Jack Thurston. Getting ideas for bike rides with my kids.  Can't wait to get out there!

In the Far Country - Nevil Shute.  A love story set in rural Australia in the post-war years.  Picked up at the book swap in Tesco.  I'm a sucker for Nevil Shute as he reminds me so much of my time in Australia. 

Like a couple upthread I am also part way through the Pillars of Earth.  Though I put it down a couple of years ago - should finish it but I can't suspend my disbelief for some of the characters.

Stichtplate on 17 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

This is going to hurt, by Adam Kay and Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman. 

Both perfectly decent books but I’ve not read anything that has really lit my fire for a couple of months now. Might go mad and splash out 8 quid on Henry Marsh’s Admissions, purely on the strength of how excellent his previous book, Do no harm, was.

Bjartur i Sumarhus on 17 May 2018
In reply to Stichtplate:

This is going to hurt, by Adam Kay

I picked this up in Waterstones a few weeks ago and a member of staff told me it was brilliant. I didn't buy it in the end for some reason and bought East West Street and Diary of a Bookseller instead. (Probably because it wasn't in the "buy one get one half price promotion" knowing how tight I am ;-)

Do no harm looks interesting, I just stuck it on my list.

 

Bjartur i Sumarhus on 17 May 2018
In reply to Bobling:

Nevil Shute, good reminder...I have been meaning to read A Town Like Alice. Have you read it?

Bob Aitken - on 17 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

As a counter to the Neville Shute view of Australia I can recommend Richard Flanagan, powerful dark writing.  'The Sound of One Hand Clapping' set in Tasmania and 'The Narrow Road to the Deep North' about the Australian PoW experience have both left me with strong impressions - to the extent that I intend to get organised to read the rest of his novels, an improbably systematic approach for me; my reading's usually hopelessly serendipitous. 

Bobling - on 17 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

Yes, it was good.  My family has strong ties to Malaysia where the PoW narrative is set so this gave it some extra resonance for me, but frankly that story is pretty compelling anyway.  Like all of his stuff it is 'of its time' but for me that is part of the charm.  I'd recommend 'On the Beach' too., I picked it up on a campsite swap shelf in Australia and have never looked back...must reread it!

sam@work - on 17 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

The Executioner by Chris Carter, its the Robert Hunter series........pretty good series so far.....


 
L samuel99 - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

I'm reading a great and romantic novel by Chetan Bhagat "The Half Girlfriend"

I have also written an article on Social Issue in India here is the link

https://www.studytoday.net/child-labour/

 

Bjartur i Sumarhus on 18 May 2018
In reply to samuel99:

Hhmm, did you just join this site to reply to my post with a link to something I dare not click on?

I feel privileged

 

Yanis Nayu - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

At the moment I’m reading a Karen Slaughter book, but I just read a wonderful book called Eleanor Olliphant is Completely Fine. Absolutely superb debut novel; highly recommended. 

nickh1964 - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

Currently White sands by Jeff Dyer, read Another great day at sea and loved it, can see myself reading more by him as this is just as good.

Pepys diaries in bed.

Just read Hitman Anders and the meaning of it all by Jonas Jonasson, a good romp. 

Sean Kelly - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth Kolbert. Very thought provoking!

elliot.baker - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

Thinking, Fast and Slow

L samuel99 - on 19 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

Nope Bro, I just put my thoughts that, I'm reading a great romantic Novel that's it. I thought to put my view on social issue, so I drop my link, I hope you don't mind it

SuperstarDJ - on 19 May 2018
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

I just finished 'As I walked out one midsummer morning' by Laurie Lee. Recommended. It's a travel book about the teenage Lee's jouney from Gloucestershire to Spain on foot in the 1930's. A fascinating look at vanished England and Spain from a very gifted writer. It's not a long book and doesn't claim to be profound but it really transported me and left me with an ache to see a lost world and to be young again. 

Post edited at 06:09
Siward on 19 May 2018
In reply to SuperstarDJ:

I'm currently on book three (of twenty) of the Patrick O 'Brian seafaring novels futtock shrouds, debauched sloths and bentincks. Lots of history, funny, transports me elsewhere  

wercat on 21 May 2018
In reply to Siward:

just finished "The Hundred Days", Killick still going strong, and have to wait for a friend to return the next so had to reopen "Eiger Wall of Death" while up at Glenbrittle.

steve taylor - on 12:24 Wed
In reply to Bjartur i Sumarhus:

Cormoran Strike - The Cuckoo's Calling by Robert Galbraith (J K Rowling).

Decently written, as you'd expect, and enjoyable... I picked this up after reading the Casual Vacancy, which was also good. I'd got bored working my way through John Le Carre's anthology and needed some light relief!

 

 

 


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