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Are walking boots essential for Ben Nevis?

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 jlouise 03 Jun 2021

Hi, I'm climbing Ben Nevis in 2 weeks and I wanted to ask about footwear. I bought some proper walking boots a couple months ago and have been wearing them on a few walks however they cause the most horrendous blisters on my heels and haven't gotten any better. No matter how well i prep my feet and plaster up I can still feel the burning/stinging of the skin coming off my heels within 30 minutes of a walk. It really makes the hike 10x harder and I'm in so much pain during it. I also own a pair of nike trail running shoes that are super comfy and have really good grip. Ive done lots of long walks in them and they've been absolutely fine. the only thing is they obviously don't have any ankle support. Is this a problem? id much rather wear these than my boots up Nevis but my friends keep telling me to wear walking boots

In reply to jlouise:

What route are you taking... for clarity I presume you mean a walking route and not a climbing/scrambling route

In reply to jlouise: I would go up in trail running shoes if the weather looked fine, they're my default for UK walks and scrambles in summer. I wouldn't go up if it looked like it might rain heavily, but you probs don't have that option so take the boots in case.

Ankle support is not something I've felt I've needed with more experience, I prefer the agility offered by shoes, as indeed became the norm in climbing. Are you confident you can tackle scramble sections by placing your feet well so you won't twist your ankle? That's it really.

 Trangia 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

Horses for courses, if you are used to walking over rough terrain in your trail running shoes without straining/twisting your ankles then they should be fine unless there is a likelihood of snow towards the top (less likely in mid summer, but can still sometimes occur). Some people are more prone to ankle injury than others, if you have been trail running/walking you probably have a good idea of your ankle strength.

Personally I like the ankle support of boots, but others are fine in shoes. I agree that blisters are horrible and can ruin an outing . Sounds as though your boots were not properly fitted for your feet at the retailer who sold them to you. 

Re idiotproof's post above, I am also assuming you mean walking up, not climbing?

Post edited at 15:22
In reply to jlouise:

Personally I like the combo of approach shoes (with reasonably stiff soles) and a pair of poles. I find poles offer more support than a pair of walking boots would and you actually go much faster than you would in boots.

 PaulJepson 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

The tourist path up Ben Nevis, from what I remember, is pretty well laid. If you've been fine with trail runners on other hiking trails, you should be fine. Stiff walking boots are not essential at all; I don't even own a pair any more. I'd not hesitate to go up in my Salomon trainers in summer. If you're carrying a light day pack and are confident on your feet, you'll be fine.

 Tony Buckley 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

Well, it's obvious that your boots don't fit as they should (which raises other questions about where you bought them, but that's for another thread) and yes, you'd be much better wearing something with good ankle support.

That said, in fair weather there's no obligation.  Your chances of fair weather are slim.  Not impossible, but it's the Ben.  So, two strands of thought:

Can you get your boots to fit better than they do?  Footbed lifters under the heel, for instance.  A different lacing pattern.  A cheaper solution than buying new boots that you can trial and get used to ahead of time.  New boots that fit properly are the ultimate solution but that will cost money.

However, if you're confident in your balance and your ankle strength and, ideally, have or can borrow some walking poles, you might be ok.  Might; I'm not saying you will.  It's your judgement call and all responsibility for getting up and down safely rests with you, not some collection of random strangers from the internet.  You might want to investigate some waterproof sock options; I don't use them but plenty of folk on here do and might advise you.

So it's your choice.  You have options, including sacking the whole idea until you have better boot comfort and making a decent donation to mountain rescue should you knacker your ankle and have to be brought back down on a stretcher.

T.

In reply to jlouise:

I think it is a bit of an 'old wives tale' that walking boots 'support the ankles', unless one is talking about something like heavy, mid-calf length paratrooper boots. They might give a bit of extra proprioceptive feedback but as a habitual ankle turner I have found that the best solution - which works just as well when wearing trail running shoes (even under race conditions, as in the ultra-trail events I have run) is to tightly run a few strips of super-sticky 'Leukotape P' from the inside of the ankle, under the foot and up the outside of the ankle to about the height of a short sock. If I do this I rarely turn an ankle and it must be down to the extra proprioceptive feedback, given that I doubt anything short of a ski boot can resist the several-times bodyweight forces generated when running.

(Same with supposedly 'motion control' running shoes - how on earth could a bit of foam or plastic counter the forces generated when running - all they do for me is raise hotspots and blisters.)


One benefit with boots is that they keep crud out better, but I find that something like Rab trail gaiters take care of this. Also, you don't want trail shoes that are too thin or soft in the sole if you are covering a lot of loose, rocky ground all those jagged points can give the soles of the feet a real hammering.

Post edited at 15:39
 MonkeyPuzzle 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

How did you buy your boots out of interest? Did you try before you buy? Help on fit from a shop assistant or best available deal and the size chart on the internet?

 Harry Jarvis 03 Jun 2021
In reply to PaulJepson:

> The tourist path up Ben Nevis, from what I remember, is pretty well laid. If you've been fine with trail runners on other hiking trails, you should be fine. Stiff walking boots are not essential at all; I don't even own a pair any more. I'd not hesitate to go up in my Salomon trainers in summer. If you're carrying a light day pack and are confident on your feet, you'll be fine.

I agree entirely. The main path is without difficulty, and comfortable trainers are perfectly adequate.  The last time I went up, two years ago, I wore Salomon running shoes.

However, do bear in mind that at this time of year, there may be snow patches at the top - not such that you would need crampons, but you may get wet feet. 

 Lankyman 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

Full weight leather boots with an ample spread of tricouni and hob nails are your best option.

 Tony Buckley 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

You could also try wearing a thinner inner sock and a thicker outer sock, which sometimes works.  The idea is that then friction is between the socks, not between the sock and your heel.

T.

In reply to jlouise:

If you're going up the tourist path and it isn't winter conditions, then trail running shoes would be fine - same for pretty much any mountain in summer conditions provided you don't mind the risk of wet feet.

Boots give you ankle support - but if like me you can roll your foot all the way over without breaking anything (because I've done it too often!) that doesn't really matter.

In reply to jlouise:

Are you wearing two pairs of socks or double layer socks (e.g.1000 mile socks)? I assume you mean the back of your heels at the base of your achilles?

 Sean Kelly 03 Jun 2021
In reply to Lankyman:

> Full weight leather boots with an ample spread of tricouni and hob nails are your best option.

Alpenstock, climbing breeches, and a local guide is also advised if I remember my Whymper correctly!

 jlouise 03 Jun 2021
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

I bought them in Blacks, they were comfy enough in store but it's hard to tell if shoes will give you blisters without doing a proper walk in them

 MonkeyPuzzle 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

I'm sure there's the odd case where there's no sign and I've been burned myself before but I'd suggest perhaps you were let down by not having an assistant who knew what they were doing in-store. It shouldn't be that hard to help someone achieve the right fit if they are asked the right questions.

Are the boots you bought stiff leather or stitched fabric? Just trying to think how to get them so they're okay to wear in the future.

 jlouise 03 Jun 2021
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

Yeah the guy in the store wasn't the best unfortunately, sorta just asked if they felt comfortable and that was that. They're stitched fabric and rub against my Achilles heel right where the back of the boot ends. 

 PaulJepson 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

I'd recommend getting some trainer liner socks and walking socks over the top. Sounds like your boots might be a bit sloppy. More socks will fill them and any rubbage will hopefully take place between the 2 pairs of socks and not your socks and skin. You could also try some different lacing techniques to try and lock your heel in more securely. There's also the option of putting some duct tape on your heel; that can be a quick-fix for rubbing. 

 LastBoyScout 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

I'd start by going back to the shop you bought the boots and asking for advice/help with the fit. Some shops now have a fit guarantee or exchange program, but you might be over the time limit at 2 months. Given the pandemic, though, they might still be prepared to accomodate you.

You don't say if you've already tried changing the innersoles, but I had a similar issue with a new pair of boots where I added a volume reducer. That had the effect of lifting my heel up just enough to be in the wrong place and it rubbed severely - took the reducers out, heel dropped down to the right place and no problems ever since.

The worst case scenario is to buy a different pair of boots that do fit and eBay these ones.

 Lankyman 03 Jun 2021
In reply to Sean Kelly:

> Alpenstock, climbing breeches, and a local guide is also advised if I remember my Whymper correctly!

And don't forget to always maintain three points of contact

 girlymonkey 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

I'm pretty sure the standard practice is flip flops, and a Tesco carrier bag with a bottle of juice in it for sustenance!

 Mr Messy 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

Fell shoes, my knees love them.

 jdh90 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

> They're stitched fabric and rub against my Achilles heel right where the back of the boot ends. 

Strip of gaffer tape over the stitching might help, just to reduce the friction?  If you don't succeed with the return/swap that is.  Might need some shaping with scissors to lie flat without wrinkles.

I find the choice of socks can make or break my chance of getting blisters as much as the boot design does.  I get best success with one thats got a bit of thickness to it, snug fitting and tight woven. Trying to wear two socks per foot (a liner) usually messes me up but ymmv.

A few strips of inch wide fabric tape from in front of the ankle, around the heel and well onto the other side is my preventative measures on my mountain boots which always give me blisters despite what I do with sock choices and lacing. I've had better success with that than compeed which sometimes shear off or crumple.

 tjdodd 03 Jun 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

> I'm pretty sure the standard practice is flip flops, and a Tesco carrier bag with a can of Irn Bru or Tennent's Lager.

FTFY

 BuzyG 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

Wear what you find comfortable on a long walk.  Pretty much every way up is on rock, so a good thick sole with a liner.  Boots or shoes shouldn't make much difference once the snow is gone, which it should pretty much be by now.  Walking down will be worse than walking up if your foot ware is rubbing or your toes are banging against the front of your foot ware.  So just ware what is comfortable on hard ground.  Hope it goes well.

In reply to jlouise:

I've just discovered heel lock lacing which seems to have saved my new running shoes which gave me massive heel blisters when I first went out in them a few weeks back. 

I was worried they had been an expensive mistake but after that first outing I've been breaking them in by wearing them everywhere with compeed, double pairs of thick socks, heel lock lacing. Seem to be alright now without the compeed and just wearing normal socks but I'll keep the lacing as it stops them rubbing.

 girlymonkey 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

In all seriousness though, boots are for crampons, trail shoes for everything else. 

Boots are stiff and clumpy so you are far less dexterous in them and ankle support is a fallacy. Trail shoes give you far better feel and therefore footwork so protect you from injuries far better. 

 DaveHK 03 Jun 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

> In all seriousness though, boots are for crampons, trail shoes for everything else. 

This.

 girlymonkey 03 Jun 2021
In reply to tjdodd:

Irn bru is juice!! I bet some would refer to tennets as juice too! Lol

 sjminfife 03 Jun 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

I am led to believe Irn Bru is "ginger" ....but I'm on the East Coast.

 girlymonkey 03 Jun 2021
In reply to sjminfife:

I have only really heard of ginger as a Glasgow word for any fizzy juice. Surely everywhere else calls it fizzy juice?

 Fozzy 03 Jun 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

> I'm pretty sure the standard practice is flip flops, and a Tesco carrier bag with a bottle of juice in it for sustenance!

What3words in case of emergencies too

 Jenny C 03 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

I am a big fan of leather walking boots, but last time I went up Ben Nevis via the tourist path I opted for approach shoes. On the last part of the climb and across the plateau I did miss the support and stiffness of boots, but wouldn't say it was a mistake. For the descent (very repetitive on hard man made surfaces) I was incredibly glad not to be wearing boots as the lighter approach shoes offer more cushioning.

 sjminfife 04 Jun 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

You are right it's not just Irn Bru that is "ginger".

 Forest Dump 04 Jun 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

I'm a recent convert to this way of thinking! Yet to try out on any scrambly stuff though..

In reply to Jenny C:

>  I was incredibly glad not to be wearing boots as the lighter approach shoes offer more cushioning.

Have you tried Brasher boots? They're super cushiony.

 Myfyr Tomos 04 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

Something similar to these should be adequate.


 graeme jackson 04 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

Whatever you decide to wear, you can be certain that if it's a nice day you'll see loads of folks in sandals wandering up the tourist track. (quite possible even if it's a bit dreich - my 40th was damp and we had waterproofs and big walking boots - plenty of 'tourists' ill equipped for the change of weather on the top - snow still lying in July in places). 

In reply to jlouise:

Lots of things here....

You will encounter some snow/ice underfoot, it could be anything from slush to bullet hard.

Expect four seasons of weather in the day.

I tend to favour trail shoes but with the winter bits, boots maybe needed.

It sounds like Blacks did not do their job. I suspect the person who sold them knew nothing about them and probably has not actually been on terrain for boots. I despair of Blacks, they're on a par with Millets these days.

If they blister around the house, they are not the right boots for you. Take them back.

Post edited at 14:34
 Graeme G 04 Jun 2021
In reply to tjdodd:

> I'm pretty sure the standard practice is flip flops, and a Tesco carrier bag with a can of Irn Bru or Tennent's Lager and a Daily Record

> FTFY

FTFTFY

Message Removed 04 Jun 2021
Reason: Responding to spam
 mysterion 04 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

No ankle support? - the mountain police won't like that.

Wear your trainers, they sound ideal.

 CurlyStevo 04 Jun 2021
In reply to nickinscottishmountains:

Yeah I get your point but the likelihood of mid day temperature being sub zero close to mid summers day is pretty low.

Snow will likely be between slush or spring snow and very limited and summit only. Likely well stepped out in any case and very patchy, probably avoidable.

I think any foot wear will be fine, I'd more concentrate on being prepared properly clothes wise depending on the forecast

Post edited at 22:44
In reply to girlymonkey:

> Boots are stiff and clumpy so you are far less dexterous in them and ankle support is a fallacy. Trail shoes give you far better feel and therefore footwork so protect you from injuries far better. 

There is some evidence from casualty statistics that although boots *may* provide protection from sprained ankles, they do this by transferring the stress point further up the leg and so stiff boots increase the risk of tib/fib fractures. 

In reply to Ron Rees Davies:

> There is some evidence from casualty statistics that although boots *may* provide protection from sprained ankles, they do this by transferring the stress point further up the leg and so stiff boots increase the risk of tib/fib fractures. 

I'd a GP friend who switched from boots to shoes for hillwalking on the grounds that she'd rather injure her ankle than have a boot protect the ankle at the expense of her knee.

In reply to mysterion:

> No ankle support? - the mountain police won't like that.

Quite so. The Snowdonia National Park Authority even send out their wardens each year, armed with a clipboard to record how many people are wearing 'appropriate' footwear, apparently meaning 'boots or walking boots'. I hope they don't do that when events such as the Snowdonia Trail Marathon are on, as this might skew their figures somewhat!

 kaiser 05 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

Boots or shoes avoid Goretex footwear at all costs

 BuzyG 05 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

Boots are great to keep the weather out.  Boots and gaiters even better. I"m all for dry feet after a day fording streams and climbing in snow.

When it's dry and not too cold I would go for trail shoes or similar every time. Lighter and less hassle. 

But comfort is number one priority on hard ground like Ben Nevis. So I would never say don't wear a pair of comfy boots.

In reply to girlymonkey:

> In all seriousness though, boots are for crampons, trail shoes for everything else. 

I have to disagree. Boots (with or without crampons) for snow (I wouldn't like to kick steps with a pair of inov8s).

Also boots for bogs. I'm more than happy to run through then, but spending a days walk with soaking wet and muddy feet isn't my idea of fun.

> Boots are stiff and clumpy so you are far less dexterous in them and ankle support is a fallacy. Trail shoes give you far better feel and therefore footwork so protect you from injuries far better. 

Agree completely. The "You MUST wear sturdy boots or you will DIE" posted onMRT facebook pages by OAPs is clearly nonsense.

However, when I read "The new La Sportiva Hyaena, when paired with knee length goretex Injinjin toe socks and the Ultimade Direction gossamer gaiter is the ideal UK walking trainer" I can't help thinking thats a solution in need of a problem. Just buy some cheap lightweight boots.

In reply to nickinscottishmountains:

> I despair of Blacks, they're on a par with Millets these days.

They are Millets these days...

 Jenny C 05 Jun 2021
In reply to Toerag:

> Have you tried Brasher boots? They're super cushiony.

No, but I'm very happy with my current Scarpas. Mostly use them in Peak District bogs, where additional cushioning is not a requirement.

 henwardian 05 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

The most apprpriate footwear for walking up Ben Nevis would be walking boots. It's unfortunate that you boots give you blisters. It might be worth trying out Compeed on your heels. Also try lacing up differently or using thicker socks or putting a different foot bed insert in. All these things could make enough of a change to the comfort to solve your problem.

but ultimately I'd suggest that if blisters always happen after a very short distance, you are going to need to get some new boots.

What you can get up Ben Nevis in and what is sensible are two different things. I've no doubt you can walk up Ben Nevis in flipflops if you are determined enough but the sensible thing to do is use the right tool for the right job and in the case of Ben Nevis the right tool is a sturdy set of walking boots.

 Flinticus 05 Jun 2021
In reply to henwardian:

I couldn't agree with that! My boots are now only taken out for proper winter conditions, where crampons or step kicking may be required. Like many on and off here I've found trail or approach shoes to offer a better and safer experience. The only ankle injury I've ever had was while wearing boots!

The OP sounds sensible and experienced enough to decide based on the above responses. 

 Root1 05 Jun 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

> In all seriousness though, boots are for crampons, trail shoes for everything else. 

> Boots are stiff and clumpy so you are far less dexterous in them and ankle support is a fallacy. Trail shoes give you far better feel and therefore footwork so protect you from injuries far better. 

Correct up to a point but for long days out over rough rocky ground the soles of your feet will get very sore. The thicker sole of a good quality boot will be far more comfortable for long walks over that sort of terrain.

In reply to jlouise:

Trail runners FTW, comfort is key, ankle support is over rated. I would suggest if you're walking in such a manner that ankle support is required then altering your gait would be much more beneficial than the torture chambers most people cram their feet into.

People of a certain age love the idea of a big, heavy, leather, ankle supporting mountain boot because that's all they've known. How many fell runners out of the thousands that are out there are going over on their ankles regularly? Not enough that it warrants them running in big boots. Walking is inherently more controlled and therefore even less likely to cause injury. Watch where your putting your feet, take it steady on wobbly rocks and get a couple of walking poles to steady yourself if you feel it's required.

Above all- have fun!  

In reply to Root1:

I'd like to counter that point with a yeah, nah. 

The more give and comfort in the sole you have the better. If you can feel the rocks through your soles I'd suggest trail runners with thicker soles or inserting some inner soles. Hard soles lead to hard soles rubbing on soft skin. If you're on uneven and rocky ground then the rubbing inside the shoe will be more pronounced, softer soles will have give, being able to move and form around the foot. A harder sole will not have the give required which will then lead to hot spots and eventually blisters. Trail runners are also hella more breathable, reducing how much feet sweat therefore reducing malleability forming within the skin.

Sock choice is key as well, but that's another discussion for another day.

 gravy 07 Jun 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

FTFY

I'm pretty sure the standard practice is flip flops, and a Tesco carrier bag with cans of tennants in it for sustenance!

 girlymonkey 07 Jun 2021
In reply to Root1:

Nope! I have worked as a walking guide for years, trudged the Ben path more times than I could count. I have never had sore feet in trail shoes and have had any time I have worn boots! Years of guiding have lead me to the conclusion that boots are awful. You get wet in any footwear on a properly wet day, but underfoot comfort and accurate foot placement due to being able to feel properly outweigh wet feet. 

 girlymonkey 07 Jun 2021
In reply to Ridge:

> I have to disagree. Boots (with or without crampons) for snow (I wouldn't like to kick steps with a pair of inov8s).

I slightly over simplified, if I am expecting proper snow or steep snowy sections then I will wear winter boots. But my footwear is either b3 boots or inov8. If I am sure I will be on shallow enough ground all day, or am happy to turn back if it's not shallow enough, I wear trail shoes with microspikes. 

> Also boots for bogs. I'm more than happy to run through then, but spending a days walk with soaking wet and muddy feet isn't my idea of fun.

Boots wet out within a short time anyway. Better wet trail shoes than wet boots!

 Pero 07 Jun 2021
In reply to Flinticus:

> I couldn't agree with that! My boots are now only taken out for proper winter conditions, where crampons or step kicking may be required. Like many on and off here I've found trail or approach shoes to offer a better and safer experience. The only ankle injury I've ever had was while wearing boots!


The only ankle injury I've ever had was wearing approach shoes.  So, where does that leave us?  Your anecdote raised to a universal truth, or mine?

Post edited at 20:45
 mattyP 07 Jun 2021
In reply to Pero: I’ve had ankle injuries in both and neither so where does that leave us?

 bouldery bits 07 Jun 2021
 crayefish 08 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

Totally fine if the weather is suitable.

Hilariously, in the Andes a couple of friends and I were climbing a 5k peak as part of aclimatisation for Aconcagua.  We just wore our trail running shoes (it was sunny).  We started late, but we easy overtook the large groups of idiots plodding up in their Scarpa Phantom 8000s (and equivalent).  On the way down, passing them again, we could help but loudly discuss whether this was the highest peak we did in trainers. 

 BuzyG 08 Jun 2021
In reply to crayefish:

So  did you wait at the top for the group in boots to walk up and start down again?

In reply to jlouise:

Many years ago I was 'breaking in' a new pair of walking boots and they tended to give me blisters after a few miles. I was invited on a long mountain walk and didn't have any other boots so I set off wearing the boots but put some trainers in my pack 'just in case' after a few miles I started to feel discomfort setting in. I switched to the trainers and it was a complete joy. Not just the lack of pain at the heel but the walking became so much more pleasurable without the heavy boots, being able to step nimbley where I wished.

I now take the view that boots are really only about keeping wet out.

The boots I wore never got any better and got use as gardening footwear. I've got a couple of pairs of 'proper' walking boots that are comfortable but hardly ever use them as they are reserved for wet and wintry walks.

 Graeme G 08 Jun 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

Can I just check. You say you’re a walking guide, but Innov8 advertise their products as being for either running or fast hiking. Are you able to provide a service for clients who want to walk up Ben Nevis slowly? TIA.

 Graeme G 08 Jun 2021
In reply to dabble:

> People of a certain age love the idea that because they’re young they somehow know the world better than those who have gone before them. They offer their opinions of others without any thought of who they might be talking about. They don’t stop to think that many of the innovations they talk of, are the creations of the generations that came before them. Based on decades of experimentation. They don’t consider that maybe they make different choices based on experience for more reasons than “ that's all they've known”.

FTFY.

 Sans-Plan 08 Jun 2021
In reply to jlouise:

I love these type of threads, some unsuspecting punter happens across what they see as an outdoor forum.

We are 66 replies in and the OP hasn't even acknowledged the advice, probably due to the fact they are sat scrolling the thread trying to figure out what the hell is happening and beginning to wish they never asked!

Personally i will go with, wear what's comfortable.

 Graeme G 08 Jun 2021
In reply to Sans-Plan:

> Personally i will go with, wear what's comfortable.

^ This 

 Lankyman 08 Jun 2021
In reply to mattyP:

> I’ve had ankle injuries in both and neither so where does that leave us?

This doesn't make sense. You've either had ankle injuries in one type or another or both (or none). Possibly at the same time if you were wearing both types one on each foot. Like if you'd lost a boot and hopped down the track and come across an abandoned trail shoe.

 Basemetal 08 Jun 2021
In reply to Lankyman:

It makes grammatical sense enough if there are further alternatives... like sandals, wellies, bare feet...

 girlymonkey 08 Jun 2021
In reply to Graeme G:

It's ok, I can turn off the ultra boost mode that comes inbuilt with running shoes!! 😜

In reply to jlouise:

The footwear to wear is the stuff that fits and doesn't turn your feet into chilli con carne. After that it's basically negotiable.

b

 Graeme G 08 Jun 2021
In reply to girlymonkey:

How do you find the Innov8’s for durability? Have you used them on Skye?  I’m a big leather boot fan most of the year, until summer weather when they’re generally too hot. Only ever use GoreTex boots then. Have been looking at various options for this summer and hadn’t considered Innov8 as they strike me as too specialist (ie running) and thin.

Post edited at 10:48
 Sans-Plan 08 Jun 2021
In reply to Graeme G:

I have never been particularly impressed with the Inov8 longevity, I don't use them personally as they don't fit my feet but my Mrs does and has trashed pairs in less then 100 miles, on the other hand other folk swear by them and wont wear anything else.

In reply to Graeme G:

Thanks, I'll agree that innovation comes with time and things were invented and developed by the generation before me, much love to them and their forebears. However that doesn't then give them carte blanche to keep repeating that same old bad advice because they are of that same old mindset without being challenged on it, much as you have done here- challenging my somewhat small minded opinion of some people of a certain age (gained through my limited experience with a more vintage class of climber), and I welcome the discourse. I would suggest if a product is available that is better then the previous iteration it seems daft to me to continue to use that product, and to advocate for its use because someone is unwilling to change with the times is even dafter. 

   

 Graeme G 08 Jun 2021
In reply to Sans-Plan:

That was my suspicion. I like the idea of lightweight boots when it’s warmer, drier and I’m more likely to do long (multi) days with a big pack.  Or if I’m using a bike for access. But not at the expense of having to repeatedly replace my boots.

 Sans-Plan 08 Jun 2021
In reply to Graeme G:

Plenty of other options out there, La Sportiva trail shoes are far more hard wearing in my experience.


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