UKC

/ Emansmoer Down Sleeping Bags?

Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.
Russell Lovett - on 04 Sep 2018

Im after a 4 season down bag and found these on amazon for £58.99 yes i know they seem to good to be true. They are made in china and have diffrent fill options up to 1200g with a realy high comfort rating (by the makers) I've searched on line for reviews, but cant find any they seem like a pretty good firm and also do a lot of down filled clothing. So has anyone on here got one of there bags and if so would you recommend it and is the comfort rating as good as they are suggesting -9 -19 and -24 for the 1200g fill one (asume -19 is max comfort rating). Cheers in advance for any relies.

galpinos on 04 Sep 2018
In reply to Russell Lovett:

The three numbers are normally comfort/comfort limit/extreme and, for their 1200g of down they seem comparable to a 1000g down bag of a "known" brand, though the extreme temps don't line up and there is no mention as to whether these have been tested to the EN standard.

Also, here is no mention of fill power, neck baffle, construction etc which all impact massively on bag performance. There is also the ethical stance as well, where has the cheap down been sourced from...........

Post edited at 16:17
Andy Johnson on 04 Sep 2018
In reply to Russell Lovett:

In general, I find that you get what you pay for, and I'd expect to pay several hundred pounds for a decent winter bag. If you're just going to be using it to go car camping in the Lakes then the worst that can happen is probably that the stitching goes and you have a tent full of damp down. I wouldn't trust anything that cheap in a situation where it might have to keep me alive (or even just comfortable) though.

Also, my guess is that Emansmoer is just a reseller, not the Chinese manufacturer. Down production can be pretty bad from an environmental and animal welfare point of view, and a lot of Chinese down producers still live-pluck birds. Personally I'd go for a reputable EU-based manufacturer and decent traceability (something like Down Codex). Costs more but the bag is likely to last too.

 

Post edited at 16:36
Russell Lovett - on 04 Sep 2018
In reply to galpinos:

At these prices i realise the quality is not going to be top of the range (no neck baffle and probs no zip baffle) and the downs origins maybe questonable, but i already have a great 2/3 season quilt and don't  need another what im after is a 4 season bag so will this do the job they claming it can do or is this to good to be true. Anyones comments with first hand info on this product would be much appreciated.

Andy Johnson on 04 Sep 2018
In reply to Russell Lovett:

> so will this do the job they claming it can do or is this to good to be true.

I don't see what they're claiming it will do. It just says "Good for outdoor camping, hiking, travelling, walking, trekking and so on, also fit for indoor and office." Define "good".

What do you want it to do and in what sort of environment?

At a guess I'd say it'd be like a £39.99 disposable festival tent/bag/mat combo from Millets. May well keep you warm down to +3c, and last a season of moderate use. May leak down a bit. Spraying it with tx direct may help.

Post edited at 17:11
Russell Lovett - on 04 Sep 2018
In reply to Andy Johnson:

What im interested in is will it keep me warm overnight camping in say Glen Etive in winter with snow on the ground and temps well below zero. Im not expecting to hear good things about this bag as it is so cheep, just thought id ask on the off chance someone on here has come across one and they are the bargain they appear to be, though i realise this is a long shot.

teh_mark on 04 Sep 2018
In reply to Russell Lovett:

Are you really happy saving a few quid by taking advantage of animals that have had a shit life and a shit death? Are you happy inflicting pain and suffering on a living creature so you can enjoy a warm night's sleep?

Have a good, long, hard think about that.

richlan - on 04 Sep 2018
In reply to teh_mark:

Agreed, after reading the BMC articles and  doing a bit more research I won’t buy another down product, ever.

Post edited at 20:04
Ian W - on 05 Sep 2018
In reply to Russell Lovett:

It might keep you warm, it might not. I don't care whether its rated as 4 season or not, but at that price point, it wont be well enough made, and the base materials for what we would accept as a 4 season bag simply cannot be sourced for that retail price. Even in China. And at those temp ratings??

There's a reason everyone else's 4 season bags cost so much more than that, and a hell of a lot of them are made in China as well.

nniff - on 05 Sep 2018
In reply to Russell Lovett:

Well, in 1980 one of the new generation Chinese bags that were brought into the UK by Ultimate (RIP) cost £120 with a 1000g fill.  I've still got it.  IMHO it is likely to be utter crap, but more feathers than down, with a nylon shell that lets it through, a low stitch count that lets more through and a welfare approach on a par with throwing donkeys off a cliff.  Experience says buy cheap, buy twice and have a miserable time while you find the extra money.

A 900g bag from Decathlon, 15% feather, 85% down , rated to 0 degrees, will cost you £109.  Go figure.

Russell Lovett - on 05 Sep 2018
In reply to nniff:

Looks like everyone is of the same opinion as i was realy. Dawn photography from high on a wintery Scotish mountain after a overnight solo wildcamp and cheep bags don't go well together and you could find yourself in real trouble unless you have good gear. Think I'll look for a branded uk make and if i have to, take along my down 3 season camping quilt and stuff that inside my new bag if i can only afford a lower rated bag. Any suggestions on a decent alternative would be appreciated. I would be using it in winter for high level mountain wild camping in snow, in The Lakes, but mostly in Scotland. 

Guy Hurst - on 05 Sep 2018
In reply to Russell Lovett:

A Rab Ascent 700 or Alpkit SkyeHigh 700 and a really good mat would do a decent job. If you can't afford an expensive Exped down mat or similar, a good closed cell foam mat would be fine for warmth, if not that comfortable. You could always combine it with a light air filled mat, like one of the ones from Alpkit.

richlan - on 05 Sep 2018
In reply to Russell Lovett:

Due to the above reasons stated above regarding down products, is there any particular reason why you are not considering synthetic for that task ?

For instance:

https://rockrun.com/collections/sleeping-bag-synthetic/products/mountain-hardwear-hyperlamina-torch-3

olddirtydoggy - on 05 Sep 2018
In reply to Russell Lovett:

Request a bag for sale in the buying/selling section on here. Somebody will have something kicking about they want rid of.

teh_mark on 05 Sep 2018
In reply to Guy Hurst:

> ...a really good mat...

I can't highlight this strongly enough. You can have the warmest sleeping bag in the world, but it's no good keeping all that warmth inside your bag if you're wasting all your energy heating the ground up. A good mat will make things much better, and is a cheaper upgrade than spending a fortune on a fantastic sleeping bag.

Siward on 05 Sep 2018
In reply to teh_mark:

Although my old five season karrimat does very well in snow, and a much cheaper (and robust ) upgrade than some super inflatable down mat thang.

And since the op has a warm quilt, a 3 season synthetic bag with it might make a good versatile system 

Post edited at 20:37
Russell Lovett - on 05 Sep 2018
In reply to teh_mark:

Already use a Thermarest prolite plus inflatable mat sp heat lost to the ground is not a problem.

 

Russell Lovett - on 05 Sep 2018
In reply to richlan:

I was looking at down as it packs down very small. Was thinking of doing quite a bit of winter wild camping high up in the Lakes, but mainly in Scotland this winter just to get great light early in the morning for photography. Most of these will probably be solo trips (can't usualy find anyone daft enough to come with me camping in the snow) so will have to carry all the camara and camping gear myself so weight and size will be a big factor in what gear i can take. Photograpphy will be the main reason for the trips so will be sleeping up high and there will be snow on the ground (i hope), 

Post edited at 21:06
tingle - on 05 Sep 2018
In reply to Russell Lovett:

I usually take synthetic to Scotland unless I know 100% that I won’t encounter moisture, which is not very often. Weight saving wise I bought a carbon tripod and it still weighs an absolute tonne so few grams extra on a synthetic bag you probably won’t notice!

richlan - on 06 Sep 2018
In reply to Russell Lovett:

If you do a like for like comparison of temperature ratings I think you might be surprised, probably only a few hundred grams in it and synthetic will take more abuse than down

cander - on 06 Sep 2018
In reply to olddirtydoggy:

Would you really want someone’s old minging pit? 

olddirtydoggy - on 06 Sep 2018
In reply to cander:

Get detailed pics and if it looks like it's been in a dog bed then politely decline. Even used they can be professionally cleaned. I sold one last year and had it cleaned before sale. I totally understand why somebody would not want to buy second hand though.

tingle - on 06 Sep 2018
In reply to cander:

Im probably on the scruffier side of a climber so im not too fussy, how often do you think they wash those thick itchy hut blankets and pillows? 

cander - on 06 Sep 2018
In reply to tingle:

They do make sheet sleeping bags you know.


Please Register as a New User in order to reply to this topic.