UKC

/ light 3/4 season 2 person tent?

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
MikaelW - on 22 Aug 2018

Hi, 

So i’m looking to buy a tent for a trip I will do on my own, on 1st September, basically 3 days hiking around Corrour in Scotland.

A tent that is a compromise between light and robust. How original

The thing is, there are other requirements:

A little later I’m spending the weekend with the girlfriend in Dartmoor and i want the tent to be reasonably comfy for more casual "couple-camping" occasions.

Also, something i can use in the winter as well, a tent that can take rain and snow (toward 4-seasons, but not full-on expeditions). Skye in winter without proper storm sort of level.

 

So far, the MSR Access 2 looks like close to that set of requirements but wondering if there is anything else available?

https://www.ukclimbing.com/gear/camping/tents+bivvys/msr_access_2_tent-9385

 

Also, to be fair, i wouldn’t mind if the tent was 1kg heavier than this one but a little more comfy/sturdy.

 

Any idea? Running out of time to order but can’t make a decision on that one! Thanks in advance

 

Mikael 

Pkrynicki1984 - on 22 Aug 2018
In reply to MikaelW:

Hilleberg Nallo2 , absolutely love mine.

Toerag - on 22 Aug 2018
In reply to Pkrynicki1984:

I've a Kaitum2, and seeing as the Nallo is essentially a single-ended version of this I'd have no hesitation in recommending it to the OP.

Robin Woodward - on 22 Aug 2018
In reply to Pkrynicki1984:

We have a Lightwave T20 Hyper, which is essentially the same as the Nallo 2, but with two small vents on the front rather than one big one (and slightly lighter and cheaper I think, but not 100%).

Occasionally I think a geodesic would be nice to make pitching in calm conditions less restricting(where pegging out isn't really required), but they tend to be heavier, and often don't have the triple pitching options (inner first, outer first or just one).

Ramblin dave - on 22 Aug 2018
In reply to MikaelW:

We've got a Lightwave G15 Raid, which seems good based on the couple of times that we've taken it out so far. I think they've deliberately aimed to go a bit heavier and sturdier than some ultralight tents, but it's still down around 1.7kg.

Rob Exile Ward on 22 Aug 2018
In reply to MikaelW:

I replied on another similar thread, I bought a Vango Mirage 200 last year and have been very pleased with it, I'll be using it his winter - if not necessarily on the Cairngorm plateau! - and it's been fine for me and Mrs Exile on a number of backpacking and car camping trips.

MikaelW - on 22 Aug 2018
In reply to MikaelW:

thanks a lot for all the advice! will have a look at those. 

 

Regarding the hilleberg ones, I'm trying to stay on the dome/freestanding side of things as opposed to tunnel tents. What about the  Hilleberg Allak 2/Jannu 2?

 

Post edited at 17:46
Run_Ross_Run - on 22 Aug 2018
In reply to MikaelW:

I have the MSR Freelite 2. Purchased mainly for bike packing use so weight was crucial (inner is the same size as the Access 2) and its really good. Massive for single person use and was surprised just how much room there was inside when me and the misses took off for a few days bikepacking earlier in the month. Ok, there's not masses of room but we were able to sit inside and eat breakfast while it hammered down outside ( i think the access is even taller so should be more room). It's helped by the twin porch design so with a bit of careful placement of gear it was fine. 

Get from EMS for the best prices (or was when i got mine).

Robin Woodward - on 22 Aug 2018
In reply to MikaelW:

You could also look at something like an Exped Orion II/Orion II Extreme for a free-standing design. I love our Venus tent from them (although another semi-tunnel).

Damo on 22 Aug 2018
In reply to MikaelW:

>  What about the  Hilleberg Allak 2/Jannu 2?

I used a Jannu on Peak Lenin several years ago. It's a good strong tent, with decent length, but not the lightest around.

It also has a funny design where the top of the door in the fly/vestibule is further back than the bottom of the tent, so that falling snow or rain coming straight down just goes straight onto/into the tent. Obviously in very bad weather you'd have it all zipped up and it wouldn't matter, but it means in lesser, but still poor, weather, you can't have the vestibule door open.

Stefan Jacobsen - on 22 Aug 2018
In reply to MikaelW:

Reasonably comfy? Winter as well? Have you considered going up a size ? I would look at Hilleberg Nammatj 3 for roominess and the GT version for winter comfort. 3.3 or 4.0 kg is heavy though. Tarp tents is another option. Haven't tried one though, but among ultra lighters they are the shieet.


This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.