/ New sleeping Bag

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lone 10 Jun 2019

Hi 

I'm looking at getting a new sleeping bag, I currently have a Nanock -5 which weighs 1.6 kg and its quite bulky, my thoughts are to get something like a 0 degrees comfort down bag/quilt and back it up with a silk liner.

So in theory giving me back my -5 degrees like the Nanock.

Obviously from a physiology point of view we're all very different where it comes to our bodies and I tend to output a fair bit of heat being 14st, but can get chilled pretty easily too, has anyone used the quilt I've provided the link for before, or perhaps offer an alternative ? 

Compared to my Nanock, should I expect the Thermarest to be more fragile being so light ?

Here's a link (bottom) to a Thermarest Vesper 32 UL down quilt which weighs 440gm, my silk liner is 125gm so 565gm, thats quite a reduction in weight.

Thanks in advance

L

Link below to the Thermarest quilt:

https://www.ultralightoutdoorgear.co.uk/equipment-c3/sleeping-bags-c21/sleeping-bags-c88/vesper-32-ul-down-quilt-p11278

richlan 10 Jun 2019
In reply to lone:

Budget ?

Not convinced by quilts for lower temperatures (i may add i haven't tried one) if you want light and warm then have a look at the PHD Minimus or Minim, then use a silk liner if you need to:

https://www.phdesigns.co.uk/ready-made-sleeping-bags-ship-fast?osCsid=b6d9ifv0lsuos0amf9qjd73g30

Post edited at 16:27
Mal Grey 10 Jun 2019
In reply to lone:

I don't think a silk liner adds 5 degrees worth of warmth if that's what you're saying. I'd say just a couple of degrees. I use one, and it does make a difference, but for me, its more for comfort and keeping the expensive sleeping bag clean.

I have no experience of quilts, so can't really comment, but I too am not convinced and I'm not sure they will prove as flexible in use as a proper sleeping bag. Though I get the logic that the down under you is squashed, its only that immediately under you, and right up to the contact point the down will fill the void close to the body, keeping warmth in and minimising the space you need to heat up. I would want a warmer mat than usual if I were to risk one too.

I have a PHD Minim 500 for autumn, early spring and winter use, which is a fantastic quality bit of kit which will last me years and was worth the high investment, as I use it for probably 25-40 nights each year. I also have an Alpkit Pipedream summer bag, and have been impressed with the quality of that too, so their warmer range might be worth a look at (as well as Mountain Equipment and Rab of course).

andyd1970 10 Jun 2019
In reply to lone:

I recently bought a Mountain hardwear lamina z spark in the longer size as I’m 6ft and it only 

Weights about 1kg and it’s synthetic.

Took it out into the Mountains and loved it.

Nice and roomy but warm and it was about £80

 I think Rock and run have them on offer too

Guy Hurst 10 Jun 2019
In reply to lone:

There's no way a silk liner adds 5C to a bag; maybe 1 or 2C, but then again maybe not even that. They keep a bag clean, and feel nicer against the skin. For temperatures around freezing I'd get a good down bag rates to -5C or so, with a full length zip. If you get too warm, unzip the bag and use it like a quilt, if you get cold then wear a down gilet inside the bag, or put a fleece/down jacket over the top of it. A PHD or Western Mountaineering bag for that sort of temperature will be half the weight of the Nanook.

Also, a thermally efficient sleeping mat makes a huge difference.

Dave Cundy 11 Jun 2019
In reply to lone:

I made a quilt like the one you've linked to.   It had three straps underneath to stop it from lifting up off my sleeping mat.  The straps didn't work at all - the quilt simply lifted up between the attachment points, letting heat out and cold draughts in, every time I rolled over.  It was +5 degs outside and I had one of my most miserable nights ever. 

The only way these quilts will keep the draughts out is if you make them significantly wider, or if they go right under your mat.  Either way, that's kind of missing the point of them.

lone 11 Jun 2019
In reply to Mal Grey:

Thanks for the feedback, I was always under the impression that the silk liner would add some extra (+5) degrees to the sleeping bag

I need to change the Nanook, its a really good bag and warm but heavy and bulky, the only compromise is to loose weight else where in the pack and keep the Nanook. 

The replies have given me lots to think about so that's good, thanks

L

Run_Ross_Run 11 Jun 2019
In reply to lone:

Have pm'd you, might have gone into your spam folder.

Thanks 

teh_mark 11 Jun 2019
In reply to lone:

To add a bit of balance, I have a down quilt (the old 'basic' Nunatak one that they don't make any more) and I use it for everything from a weekend in the Peak to planned bivis on glaciers in the Alps in summer. Absolutely no problems used either in a tent or with a bivi bag - it's as warm as an equivalent sleeping bag, lighter and less bulky.

Bellie 11 Jun 2019
In reply to lone:

I'd check out some of the Mountain Equipment down bags if you are prepared to spend that kind of money.  You would get a bag thats much lighter and warm, for less than the quilt.   


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