UKC

/ Product ideas?

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John Aisthorpe - on 02 Sep 2018

What do you need designed?

Looking for problems to solve or products to improve for my product design Engineering course at uni. 

Thanks, John

im off - on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

Left handed toilet roll would be nice.

Wulfrunian - on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

Wet bags. Seems you can buy dry bags all over the place, but never seen any wet bags.

Dell on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

After my weekend of fun, a tool that can reach and uncrew the c***ing diesel filter drain plug on a f***ing Peugeot 205.   

mkean - on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to Dell:

It could be worse, anyone who can change a clio diesel filter without getting drenched in it has at least 2 more hands than me

Ridge - on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to mkean & Dell:

French cars, what else do you expect from the nation that brought us the sani-flo toilet?

 

wercat on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

modular rucksack with choice of back panel yoke material (ie synthetic or canvas), must be separately washable item.  Modular lightweight comfortable and stable outdoor carrying system with yoke, belt etc not looking overtly militaristic/sas aspirant

 

Load carrying without unnecessary sweat and smell!

Post edited at 20:54
Dave Kerr - on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to wercat:

> modular rucksack with choice of back panel yoke material (ie synthetic or canvas), must be separately washable item.  Modular lightweight comfortable and stable outdoor carrying system with yoke, belt etc not looking overtly militaristic/sas aspirant

> Load carrying without unnecessary sweat and smell!

Uberniche.

Andy Hardy on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to Dave Kerr:

Or Sherpa + deodorant :|

 

Mike-W-99 on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

Judging from the number wedged around crags around the world how about a cam removal device (or a cam that can't get stuck!). And yes I know about all the tricks to remove them, never left one yet...

Post edited at 22:20
Fozzy on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

A flushing handle for my toilet trowel. 

Tom Last - on 02 Sep 2018
In reply to mkean:

What happened to the Volvo? How do you fit in a Cleo? ;) 

Jonny on 07 Sep 2018
In reply to John Aisthorpe

- It's about time we got some kind of adaptor that would allow the majority of axes to be securely slotted onto a shovel blade. Handles are a huge waste of weight budget.

- Some double boots with a minimalist, soled inner you can wear on a greater range approach, and an outer boot with integrated (steel) crampon spikes.

- Zip-off trousers with integrated heavy-duty snow gaiters

- A better mode of protection for steep snow slopes of variable density

 - If you really want to change the world, design an effective ropeless protection system that weighs less than 2 kg per person (that'll be light enough to get us going). Sounds about right for a summer project. Is it really going to be ropes, ropes, ropes, from the cradle of alpinism to its grave? That can't be right.  

Post edited at 20:06
Roberttaylor - on 08 Sep 2018

 

> - It's about time we got some kind of adaptor that would allow the majority of axes to be securely slotted onto a shovel blade. Handles are a huge waste of weight budget.

Or a way the shovel blade could be secured to the ice axe in general, for use; doesn't need to slide on necessarily.

> - A better mode of protection for steep snow slopes of variable density

If you make this, you can have my money.

>  - If you really want to change the world, design an effective ropeless protection system that weighs less than 2 kg per person (that'll be light enough to get us going). Sounds about right for a summer project. Is it really going to be ropes, ropes, ropes, from the cradle of alpinism to its grave? That can't be right. 

Ambitious, but there was a time before dynamic ropes were a thing and they would have seemed ambitious then.

 

gethin_allen on 08 Sep 2018
In reply to Ridge:

> French cars, what else do you expect from the nation that brought us the sani-flo toilet?

I didn't know they were responsible for such crap designs.

 

tom_in_edinburgh - on 23:56 Fri
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

Something that does what Compeed does for walker's toes for climber's fingertips.

You take off the backing covering the sticky surface and roll the plaster round a fingertip when the skin is starting to get thin.  It is thin, ideally transparent and bonds firmly to itself and to skin so once it is wrapped all the way round you can pull hard on a hold without it coming off.  It will stay on for a couple of days while new skin grows under it.  The outside surface of the plaster over the finger pad is tougher than real skin and roughened up with ridges designed to make it grip rock better than skin.

ed luke. - on 06:11 Sat
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

The collapsible ice axe.

deacondeacon - on 07:24 Sat
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

How about a climbing chalk substitute which doesn't need re applying every one or two moves?

Custom moulded climbing shoes for a perfect fit?

A bouldering pad that follows you around like a robo-hoover?

A little comfy belaying bench for hanging belays that can roll up into a tiny size to hang off the back of your harness when not in use?

I'll take 33% on anything you make. Thanks. 

 

nniff - on 08:05 Sat
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

Ice axe attachments for rucksacks that work as well as the old ones did with straight axes.  Don't let the axes flop around, rattle or fall out and from which the axe can be removed reasonably easily while wearing the ice axe.  Won't catch when scrambling down something with or without an axe in place and don't have bits that are vulnerable to getting broken or lost.   Ideally, hold walking poles instead.

MFB - on 08:09 Sat
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

Crampons that extend and retract into sole of boot

Carbon fibre? carabiners

Post edited at 08:09
Dave Cundy - on 11:25 Sat
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

How about a baffle system for down products (clothing, sleeping bays etc.) which is easy to make and thermally efficient.  i'd much prefer to use down rather than synthetic insulation for various applications but it always seems too much faff to create the baffles.

brunoschull - on 16:59 Sat

Let's keep it simple.

How about zippers that don't get stuck?

B

Morty - on 17:19 Sat
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

A bouldering mat drone.  It hovers a couple of inches off the ground and follows you as you climb. Good for problems that have a bit of traversing.

A portable climbing trainer - something that packs away and can be transported. Resistance training for hands/arms and feet/legs - potentially including variable sized grips to target finger/hand strength. 

A laser measuring device (possibly mounted on a very quiet, tiny drone) that can be pointed at potential placements that 3D images the placement and tells you the best bit of gear to take up.  No more massive racks just in case. 

One of those bolt firing guns from the film Cliffhanger...

 

markk on 20:21 Sat
andrewm1000 on 11:59 Mon
In reply to John Aisthorpe: A wide-mouthed 2 litre collapsible bottle to use as a pee bottle at night at altitude instead of carrying a bulky 1.5 litre Nalgene pee bottle.

 

Post edited at 12:01
GarethSL on 12:49 Mon
HeMa on 13:05 Mon
In reply to GarethSL:

True. Albeit tge requester specified 2 liters and mentiones 1.5 liters. 

HeMa on 13:15 Mon
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

How about a true backpack to rule ’em all. 

 

Needs to be about 40 to 60 liters expanded (80m rope, few pairs of shoes, harness, grub & water, and a big rack of QDs. Or one 60m half rope, big rack of gear & screws, crampons, harness, belay jacket, waterproof, and a dozen pairs of gloves). Yet cinch down to about 20 liters or less. Oh, and add a detaching rope tarp. And it needs to be light and robust. 

 

Basically it’s a rucksack that works as a (euro sport) craggin’ sack. As well as gets everything (inside) to the start of a scottish winter route (or alpine/Norway rock route, long but still doable in one go), then packs down to the size of a leader pack (belay jacket, spare gloves and some grub & drink). Or anything in between. 

 

Oh, and fit carry on limitations when ’big’ or ’nearly at ITS largest’.

Would save a lot of room in my household. 

Post edited at 13:16
blurty - on 13:20 Mon
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

Mouldable protection:

I device that could inserted into any recess in the rock, and 'inflated' to provide an anchor/ runner

Andrew Kin - on 13:25 Mon
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

Considering all the threads on here about climbers and campers littering the crags with human shit, how about something to solve the problem.  Something that can clip around the waist.  Catch the offending turd and package it up in a sealed, flushable bag when you get home. I know there are bags that can achieve the same thing but climbers and campers like to buy gadgets.  Make it out of titanium and charge £100 for it and they will buy it.

jonny taylor on 13:30 Mon
In reply to blurty:

Too late, I've already patented the "dough nut", which hardens using some sort of shape memory alloy or something.

krikoman - on 13:34 Mon
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

The perfect girlfriend

GrahamD - on 13:44 Mon
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

I'd like a product that gives you all the information that you need on all the routes in an area:

- Must be small enough to easily fit in a pocket whilst climbing

- Not rely on batteries

- Must be able to survive a fall from the top of the crag.

ianstevens - on 13:53 Mon
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

Something that blocks people who can't be arsed to do their own legwork from posting 

ianstevens - on 13:55 Mon
In reply to Jonny:

> In reply to John Aisthorpe

> - A better mode of protection for steep snow slopes of variable density

The real issue there is that the medium you're attempting to put protection into is the fallible element

ianstevens - on 13:57 Mon
In reply to HeMa:

> How about a true backpack to rule ’em all. 

> Needs to be about 40 to 60 liters expanded (80m rope, few pairs of shoes, harness, grub & water, and a big rack of QDs. Or one 60m half rope, big rack of gear & screws, crampons, harness, belay jacket, waterproof, and a dozen pairs of gloves). Yet cinch down to about 20 liters or less. Oh, and add a detaching rope tarp. And it needs to be light and robust. 

Given the carry on limit is 55 L, it will take more than an engineering student to get a 60L bag to fit in it.

HeMa on 14:31 Mon
In reply to ianstevens:

I did write that fit in limits either fully expanded or nearly so. 

 

Btw, it’s rather Odd that my purpose made light bag happens to be 60 + 10 liters. And Yes, it is ’legal’.

ianstevens - on 14:57 Mon
In reply to HeMa:

At 60L?? I presume you must used it compressed down to get in hand luggage? 

maxsmith - on 15:02 Mon
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

A rucksack which has an attachment to carry a scooter/bike/whatever mad contraption my children decide to take to the park but are too tired to pilot home. 

tlouth7 on 16:29 Mon
In reply to HeMa:

> How about a true backpack to rule ’em all. 

I think my post (#10) in this rucksack thread pretty much hits every one of your points:

https://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/gear/best_rucksack_for_climbing_and_camping-692688

A dry treated rope at half the weight and cost would be great, ideally non tangling or self coiling.

A sling with curtain wire in the weave to make it hold any shape you bend it to. Helpful for difficult threads. Mustn't rust or fatigue, or be much heavier than a normal sling.

Ramon Marin - on 17:52 Mon
In reply to John Aisthorpe:

Clip-on crampon. Like the cycling shoes system, but instead of a pedal, a crampon plate.


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