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/ Weekend Warrior/Nice weather only Hiking :) (Gear Suggestions)

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L Mike84 - on 01 Oct 2018

Hello I've been lurking on this forum for a while this is my first post here.

I'm interested in Hiking but the kind of hiking I want to do is: just nice fair weather, I'll avoid cold/winter months and preferably rain also, one day hikes only as I want a warm room and a hot food/shower at the end of the day if the weather is bad I'll cancel the hike. (The only kind of hiking I've done in the past is in the military where cold wet and miserable conditions were norm, when I left I promised myself I will never be wet, cold, miserable and stinky again unless I'm getting paid for it so no way in hell am I hiking for pleasure in foul weather   ).

I'm probably overthinking this but I'm in the process of buying equipment and need some recommendations as I plan to start exploring some of the UK outdoors, I moved here a couple of years ago so I haven't had the chance yet to see much of the UK outside of London....

For a pack I managed to get a good deal on a Mystery Ranch Scree 32L backpack (overkill by I got a good deal on it £80 something, and most of the time I'll be carrying essentials for two me+girlfriend )

 Managed to get some Karimor Hot Rock Trousers  from Sports Direct that I really like.

I'm stuck a bit on jacket/layers Paramo vs Goretex….

I found a Paramo Helki Jacket for about £150 so I'm hoping this will have me covered for UK conditions?

Or would I be better served by a Gore-Tex Hard-shell?, again I'm not going to hike in the rain unless I'm getting caught in it and I assume that in the UK this is quite a common occurrence and in the mountains it's going to be cold and windy most of the time.

I also have an Arktis Light Rainshield Jacket, I have this form back in the day in the military http://www.arktisoutdoor.co.uk/mens-jackets-and-coats/a310-rainshield-light-jacket-coat/a310-rainshield-light-jacket-coat-black

So I'm thinking if the S""£%T really hits the fan this over the paramo jacket should have me covered or would it defeat the purpose of the Paramo?

And one more question what do I wear under the Paramo jacket ? I'm thinking of a thin merino hoody and maybe a thin merino short sleeve ?

Again I'm probably overthinking all this but I quite enjoy reading about the different available gear and how it all functions I've been reading a bit form Any Kirkpatrick's website...

 

Post edited at 16:24
L Mike84 - on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

And one more thing I forgot, do I still need to buy a synthetic/down Jacket ? Or The Paramo jacket will suffice ?

Stichtplate on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

Andy K is good on gear but I'm afraid nailing down specific recommendations is all down to personal preference. Some people run hot, some cold. A brand that's a perfect fit for some might be awful for others and don't go anywhere near the Paramo Vs Goretex debate on here

Only advice I'd give is buy what fits, pay as much as you think's reasonable and avoid paying full price (there's always another sale just around the corner).

captain paranoia - on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

Here are my thoughts on layering, in a post from nine years ago now, but dating back quite a bit further...

https://www.ukclimbing.com/forums/gear/layering_clothing_and_mountaineering-377801#x5471096

Tringa on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

> Hello I've been lurking on this forum for a while this is my first post here.

> I'm interested in Hiking but the kind of hiking I want to do is: just nice fair weather, I'll avoid cold/winter months and preferably rain also, one day hikes only as I want a warm room and a hot food/shower at the end of the day if the weather is bad I'll cancel the hike. (The only kind of hiking I've done in the past is in the military where cold wet and miserable conditions were norm, when I left I promised myself I will never be wet, cold, miserable and stinky again unless I'm getting paid for it so no way in hell am I hiking for pleasure in foul weather   ).

> I'm probably overthinking this but I'm in the process of buying equipment and need some recommendations as I plan to start exploring some of the UK outdoors, I moved here a couple of years ago so I haven't had the chance yet to see much of the UK outside of London....

> For a pack I managed to get a good deal on a Mystery Ranch Scree 32L backpack (overkill by I got a good deal on it £80 something, and most of the time I'll be carrying essentials for two me+girlfriend )

>  Managed to get some Karimor Hot Rock Trousers  from Sports Direct that I really like.

> I'm stuck a bit on jacket/layers Paramo vs Goretex….

> I found a Paramo Helki Jacket for about £150 so I'm hoping this will have me covered for UK conditions?

> Or would I be better served by a Gore-Tex Hard-shell?, again I'm not going to hike in the rain unless I'm getting caught in it and I assume that in the UK this is quite a common occurrence and in the mountains it's going to be cold and windy most of the time.

> I also have an Arktis Light Rainshield Jacket, I have this form back in the day in the military http://www.arktisoutdoor.co.uk/mens-jackets-and-coats/a310-rainshield-light-jacket-coat/a310-rainshield-light-jacket-coat-black

> So I'm thinking if the S""£%T really hits the fan this over the paramo jacket should have me covered or would it defeat the purpose of the Paramo?

> And one more question what do I wear under the Paramo jacket ? I'm thinking of a thin merino hoody and maybe a thin merino short sleeve ?

> Again I'm probably overthinking all this but I quite enjoy reading about the different available gear and how it all functions I've been reading a bit form Any Kirkpatrick's website...

 

I'm lucky I have quite a lot of choice in where and when I walk so I can avoid pouring rain. In the UK the cold is not usually a major problem unless you are caught somewhere high and/or in a difficult situation.

This is what I use -

For day walks, which what I do almost all the time, I use Craghopper trousers. The normal ones are fine for me, but Mrs Tringa has a pair of lined ones and reckons they are cosy.

My usual base layer is just  polo shirt (I know this would no be acceptable to many but most of the time it does for me), sometimes I'll use one of the T shirts that is better at wicking away sweat.

On top of that I use a mid weight fleece(I've used Berghaus, Lowe Alpine, Karrimor, Regattta and IMO there is not a huge difference between them).

The waterproof/windproof layer is a Paramo jacket I've had for around 15 years. It breathes better than anything else I've had, but then I've had it so long the newer other types of breatheables might be better now. In really wet weather it often wets out completely on the outside, to the extent of water dripping off the hem, but nothing gets through.

However, as others have said its down to personal preference.

Dave

 

 

Post edited at 19:59
L Mike84 - on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to captain paranoia:

Brilliant this was very helpful!

Thanks!

So I think I got this right:

1.Base layer- (I'd go for a merino long sleeve hooded top, can be worn on it's own when hot outside with maybe a short sleeve t-shirt over ?)

2.Fleece one thin one thicker depending on temperature and wind if cold wear both?

3.Windproof shell + 4.Waterproof shell over the fleece (one or the other depending on conditions windy/cold or raining)? 

5.Down/Synthetic Jacket when static in cold conditions.

So where would the Paramo jacket I ordered fit here (It's on it's way have not received it yet)…..If I understand correctly it would replace  point 2, 3 and 4 above? But what about when warm summer spring temps would it not be too hot ? It makes more sense to use the 5 layers as you can adjust adapt better after reading your post it makes more sense to go Windproof shell + Waterproof Hard Shell only when needed...……...I don't see where I'd fit the Paramo jacket in here as Summer Spring it would be too hot, and in heavy rain it wont be as waterproof as a Gore-Tex jacket...…….

Post edited at 20:35
hbeevers on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

I wear paramo and have a gore Tex set. In paramo, I wear a Merino base under and have a synthetic jacket for stops. If it's going to be wet for long periods or off and on paramo is great as long as you're moving or stopped with the synthetic on!

Gore Tex requires more layers for me. A base, mid layer and soft shell then the waterproof for when it really rains. I normally pack a down gilet to wear under the waterproof if it's cold.

Paramo breathes like a soft shell but is only dependably waterproof if re proofed consistently. Sometimes water penetrates but as long as you're moving or in the synthetic, you'll be comfortable.

 

humptydumpty - on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

> I'm interested in Hiking but the kind of hiking I want to do is: just nice fair weather, I'll avoid cold/winter months and preferably rain also

If you only hike in these conditions, couldn't you just walk in normal clothes?  Seems a bit unlikely in the UK, though!

TobyA on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

If you haven't actually done any walking yet you are totally over thinking it. Like, massively so. It actually sounds like you are more interested in reading gear reviews and the like than you are in going walking. That might not be true, but that's what it sounds like.

Where are you actually planning on going? To the Lakes or North Wales? Or just out of London for a stroll on the Downs or along the cliff tops down on the south coast?

I'd go to Decathlon, buy a synthetic or merino t-shirt or long sleeve top, get one of their 5 quid micro fleeces, or push the boat out on a more fancy fleece, and get a basic waterproof with a hood and some pockets. A hat and some gloves if you are going out on frosty mornings too, and some basic waterproof trousers if you are going to the bigger hills like in Wales or the north.

The Decathlon stuff works well, is very reasonably priced and looks good quite often too. For lowland walking in summer trainers is probably all you need, maybe some walking boots if its a bit muddy. You don't need anything fancy for walking in the hills either, particularly if you are just going to go out when the weather is ok.

L Mike84 - on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to TobyA:

Hi I'm planning to go to Lake District,North Wales, Scotland in the Summer, Brecon Beacons have a go at the Big 3 maybe eventually....mountains and hiking rather than trekking.... South Coast Cliffs was amazing done it a few months ago the 7 Sisters Cliff Walk really amazing obviously this didn't need any equipment other than shorts t-shirt and trainers...……….but If I'll head out to the mountains I don't really want to end up like those idiots wearing jeans and yoga pants who have to be rescued by Mountain Rescue Teams...……...but I am probably over thinking it...…… 

The only mountain experience I have is from doing mountain training stages with the military in the French Alps, some via ferrata stuff but obviously this was , with proper equipment, in large groups, proper supervision and instructors....etc going out on your own in the mountains I have a feeling is a completely different ballgame that requires proper preparation...

Post edited at 21:40
TobyA on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

Yep, you're right - the weather can be foul in all of those hill areas, and the forecasts are great nowadays but not always 100 percent. Plus you might book a weekend up in Snowdonia and then find the weather isn't so great but you still want to go out. So having decent gear is a good idea, just don't worry about it so much you never go. Like I say Decathlon is a really good place to start, something like https://www.decathlon.co.uk/mh500-w-p-jacket-dark-blue-id_8492419.html will be considerably better than jackets lots of us were using back in 90s that cost much much more not even accounting for inflation!

I wrote this some years ago http://lightfromthenorth.blogspot.com/2014/10/a-beginner-guide-to-clothing-systems.html its more focused at the hills in winter, and climbing more than walking, but the basic principles are the same.

L Mike84 - on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to TobyA:

Cheers! Thanks a lot this is helpful!

I'll also keep an eye out for ''paralysis by analysis'' and not let it happen .

captain paranoia - on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

If you have military experience, you are probably already pretty familiar with layering, as that is the basis of military clothing systems. Admittedly, there are some additional requirements for military clothing...

If you're unsure, start with day walks in easier country; the Downs, say. Try your clothing system out, and see how you get on with it.

As Toby suggests, Decathlon is a very good starting point. Most of my clothing these days comes from Decathlon.

captain paranoia - on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

> Brilliant this was very helpful!

Glad you found it helpful.

I note that, being an old thread, it had no likes or dislikes when I posted the link. Now someone has disliked it. You can't please everyone, lol...

Post edited at 22:16
Flinticus - on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

You are over thinking it.

Just consider what you might wear walking on a windy wet cold day walking along the coast for a few hours. Add boots 

 

 

Ridge - on 01 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

Paramo is a bit of an odd beast, you either get on with it or you don't.

In terms of warmth I find it comparable to a light fleece but windproof and *waterproof.

* Paramo isn't technically waterproof. It relies on a wash-in Nikwax coating to make rain bead off it, and it's supposed to wick away any water that penetrates quicker than it soaks in. In my experience it works better than goretex and similar membranes 95% of the time. In really bad conditions water can penetrate, especially if it's a model with exposed zips.

Captain Paranoia's advice is spot on, and TobyA makes some good points about the Decathlon stuff. A £500 jacket from Arcteryx is not 10 times 'better' than a £50 jacket from decathlon.

Post edited at 22:27
big on 02 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

Over the years I've come to the conclusion that I don't want an unnecessarily heavy pack, and I don't want to sweat more than I have to...

So what I wear is a light merino, or Helly-type, tshirt - never cotton, with a showerproof softshell over the top. Trousers-wise I've also gone toward light showerproof softshell.

And in my pack I carry Goretex Paclite or similar lightweight trousers and jacket - weighing about 600g between them.

I've been naughty in terms of buying, and often used www.sportpursuit.com - from them I got a Marmot Paclite jacket for £90, a Mountain Hardwear Dragon softshell jacket for £70, and from V12 some Montane Minimus overtrousers for £90ish. With a light/medium weight pullover inside the sac as well I'm covered for most eventualities short of full winter!

Ramblin dave - on 02 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

I'm with TobyA on this - there's no point going overboard on stuff if you're mostly planning to go out in reasonably good conditions. Buy a decent set of respectable low-budget stuff and if anything's crap or falls apart then you can try replacing it with a more gucci option which may or may not be any better.

> 1.Base layer- (I'd go for a merino long sleeve hooded top, can be worn on it's own when hot outside with maybe a short sleeve t-shirt over ?)

I'd say any synthetic baselayer, to be honest. Merino is nice but expensive, and for my money only really earns its keep when it's not too smelly on day three of a backpacking trip. Long sleeves are good, but I've never felt the need for a hooded baselayer and I go out in fairly interesting weather.

> 2.Fleece one thin one thicker depending on temperature and wind if cold wear both?

Yep, that's good.

> 3.Windproof shell + 4.Waterproof shell over the fleece (one or the other depending on conditions windy/cold or raining)? 

Windproof is a bit of a luxury, but I guess if you can find one cheap. Waterproof shell, yes. Avoid super lightweight stuff (say, jackets less than 300g) as it isn't normally that durable. Don't get Tesco Value, but there's no need for some Arcteryx thing designed for cutting-edge Himalayan mountaineering either.

> 5.Down/Synthetic Jacket when static in cold conditions.

A cheap synthetic thing or maybe an extra fleece or even an old sweater is good to have. Again, you don't need to worry too much about having the totally optimal piece of gear unless you're going out in crap conditions.

Also: Thinsulate gloves and hats from petrol stations are good. A buff is good as it can keep your neck warm if it's cold or the sun off your head when it's hot. Reasonable walking trousers and overtrousers.

Tringa on 02 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

> Brilliant this was very helpful!

> Thanks!

> So I think I got this right:

> 1.Base layer- (I'd go for a merino long sleeve hooded top, can be worn on it's own when hot outside with maybe a short sleeve t-shirt over ?)

> 2.Fleece one thin one thicker depending on temperature and wind if cold wear both?

> 3.Windproof shell + 4.Waterproof shell over the fleece (one or the other depending on conditions windy/cold or raining)? 

> 5.Down/Synthetic Jacket when static in cold conditions.

> So where would the Paramo jacket I ordered fit here (It's on it's way have not received it yet)…..If I understand correctly it would replace  point 2, 3 and 4 above? But what about when warm summer spring temps would it not be too hot ? It makes more sense to use the 5 layers as you can adjust adapt better after reading your post it makes more sense to go Windproof shell + Waterproof Hard Shell only when needed...……...I don't see where I'd fit the Paramo jacket in here as Summer Spring it would be too hot, and in heavy rain it wont be as waterproof as a Gore-Tex jacket...…….

 

I'm know I'm someone who is warm most of the time, but that list look over the top to me.

I think a Merino base layer is going to be pretty warm by itself when it is 'hot outside' never mind with a T shirt over the top.

I'd dispense with a windproof shell and just go for a waterproof layer which will be windproof too.

The Paramo jacket you've ordered will be that water and windproof outer layer. My old Paramo jacket is quite heavy but many of the newer Paramo outer layers are much lighter, which I guess the one you have ordered will be.

Everyone's experience is different but I would be very surprised if a Paramo jacket is not waterproof in heavy rain. As I put in my earlier post my jacket has been dripping wet on the outside and nothing has got through. If you want water to always bead up on a Paramo jacket then regular reproofing might well be needed. I'm not that bother and have reproofed my jacket about 5 times in the last 15 years.

Dave

 

GrahamD - on 02 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

For what you describe you only need inexpensive walking gear from the budget brands like Regatta.  Fleeces are pretty much fleeces despite the protestations of the brand obsessed.  Save your money for the important bit - really well fitting footwear.  And beer money.

marsbar - on 02 Oct 2018
In reply to Mike84:

Don't forget suncream in the nice weather! 

Personally I run hot when walking so short sleeve wicking top and lightweight shorts in the summer.  Maybe a lightweight windproof jacket in case of cold when stopping or a shower.  

When it's colder I generally wear soft shell trousers and a long sleeved baselayer.  I might carry a down gilet for cold when stopping and a hardshell for rain.  Or my old windstopper fleece is shower proof and warm but not great in very bad rain.     

I'm not really sure of the recent developments in fabrics etc.  I have a very old goretex and it's fine for me so I stick to it.  I don't tend to wear it unless it's raining.  

I would recommend spending on socks and boots more than other items.  Blisters are a pain.  

L Mike84 - on 02 Oct 2018
In reply to marsbar:

Luckily I'm set for Boots and socks as I have a pair of Asolo Fugitive GTX from when I was in the military plenty of life left in them and they fit my feet perfectly, and for socks I have loads of Smartwool Socks that I use for work anyway ( I have to wear boots at work hence the Smartwool socks).

 

Post edited at 18:36

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