/ cycling to munros

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BBM66 - on 15 Feb 2019

hiya everyone. just looking for some advice about cycling to munro starts. What would you do about leaving your bike? Do any/many carparks have a cycle rack/some sort of reasonably secure way of storing bike at all? really keen to do a cycle tour tour of the munros but unsure about leaving the bike whilst going up & down the hill... TIA, have a great weekend!

Post edited at 00:01
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aln - on 15 Feb 2019
In reply to BBM66:

> munro rose starts. 

What are they? 

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BBM66 - on 16 Feb 2019
In reply to aln:

typo, sorry!

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aln - on 16 Feb 2019
In reply to BBM66:

I guessed that... What did you actually mean? 

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BBM66 - on 16 Feb 2019
In reply to aln:

The start of routes for heading up a munro i.e. carpark..?

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aln - on 16 Feb 2019
In reply to BBM66:

Ah OK. Your edited post has taken away the potential beauty of the Munro rose starts... 😛

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Eric9Points - on 16 Feb 2019
In reply to BBM66:

Most, if not all, lay bys and car parks don't have racks.

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Deleted bagger - on 16 Feb 2019
In reply to BBM66:

The Rev Robertson left his trusty steed grazing in the long grass......... 

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Clint86 - on 16 Feb 2019
In reply to BBM66:

Yes, lay it down in the long grass just far enough away from path/road so that won't be stumbled on, lock it up and enjoy your day.

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Siward on 16 Feb 2019
In reply to Clint86:

Agree with Clint. You'd be unlucky, outside of honeypot areas, to have any trouble. Probably best not to use one's new £5K mountain bike though.

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buzby - on 16 Feb 2019
In reply to BBM66:

I carry a lightweight long wire cable that has a loop in  each end and run it through both wheels and the frame and padlock it to anything I can find like a fence. It wont stop any determined thief but means it cant just be cycled away easily. 

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Emily_pipes - on 18 Feb 2019
In reply to BBM66:

I've cycled to many munros.  If I can lock it to a fence or something else, I do, but if I'm alone and there's no handy fence, I use a D lock between the front wheel and the frame, so if you wanted to move the bike, you'd have to carry it a long way. Usually I'm with OH and we lock the bikes together, so you'd have to carry two bikes a long way. 

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Gavalanche - on 07 Mar 2019
In reply to BBM66:

When leaving the bike anywhere I padlock it to something solid, through both back wheel and the frame

If out somewhere remote I tend to go slightly off the track out of sight and padlock through the back wheel and frame.

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Fat Bumbly2 - on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to Gavalanche:

More concerned with the theft of gravitational potential energy.  I usually leave the bike out of sight, preferably above the road/path.   Interference by haters or numpties is unlikely but best not to give them an opportunity.

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Jeremy Ashcroft - on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to BBM66:

I generally hide mine amongst undergrowth or in trees. I also cover it with fallen vegetation (heather, broken, branches) to break up the profile. A reasonable distance away from paths etc and it highly unlikely anybody would ever find it. I also take note of the location carefully and take a photo with my phone...it can be surprisingly difficult to find it again on return!

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Rick Graham on 09 Mar 2019
In reply to Jeremy Ashcroft:

What amuses me, particularly in Scotland, is that optimum bike leaving/hiding spots usually already have bikes locked in situ. I may just be a late starter.

Never had a problem, except finding the bike again, usually with a bit of relief.

As you say, often looks different in the afternoon compared to the morning.

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ebdon on 10 Mar 2019
In reply to BBM66:

As well as hiding in the undergrowth and using a small lock I often take an axel or qr skewer out to prevent someone riding away with it. 

As others have said finding it on the return leg is sometimes as much of a worry as theft!

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Mark Bannan - on 11 Mar 2019
In reply to BBM66:

For many Munros, you can just keep cycling after the road-end. Useful to have a mountain bike for this, though.

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Howard - on 17 Mar 2019
In reply to Mark Bannan:

A cautionary tale:-

Last year when descending from Dun Da Ghaoithe on Mull, I was following a couple down the hill. When they crossed a stile they stopped, much to my surprise. However, when I got to the stile myself, they explained that they could not get their bike lock to one of their bikes unlocked. They had tried all the usual solutions, with no success. They must have been desperate as they asked me if I knew anyone who had an Angle Grinder on the island. The answer, unsurprisingly, was No. Thy had a real problem as they had to get back to Glasgow that night.

I carried on as I could not help. However, the story has a happy ending- they passed me while I was walking down the road to my car in Craignure.

Moral: If you are going to lock your bike, make sure the lock is in good working order.

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Andrew Lodge - on 17 Mar 2019
In reply to BBM66:

We did this a lot when living is Scotland, as others have said, if there is no fencepost to lock them to lay the down in some heather. We always had two bikes so lock them together facing opposite directions which would make it really hard to wheel them away.

Only bother we ever had was finding them again.

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