UKC

/ I need to speed up

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Flinticus - on 15 May 2018

Just back from my first (new) munro in about a year. That matches the rate set the year before. Beinn Bhrontain, with a total of about 27km walked. Damn but I should have tagged it onto the walk I did when visiting Monadh Mor, Carn Ban and Mullach CLach a'Bhlair.

Got 67 to 'do' if I am to complete a round and at this rate I will be dead long before unless I can download my persona into a new body (assuming the rules don't state that any self-replicant begins a new round)

 

Pids - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

Hmmm, I've got 42 to do, have been managing about 1 tick per year for the last 5 or 6 years, similar to you I need to get my finger out

Siward on 15 May 2018
In reply to Pids:

Same here, I've slowed right down after two hundred and something. Mind you I've done most of the awkward ones I've no excuse... 

JJ Krammerhead III - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

I feel so much better about life now I've decided not to finish them (with 39 to go). Knees are happier too. 

1
Flinticus - on 15 May 2018
In reply to JJ Krammerhead III:

You know,  I was pondering this while walking past loads of lovely beautiful wild camp spots, with Scots Pine and fresh burns and thinking 'What the hell am I doing this for?'

Perhaps this accounts for the low rate? Last free weekend I went camping on a loch shore. A 2km walk, a fire (on shingle right down at the shoreline) and a few beers (all rubbish removed and evidence of fire). So much more enjoyable!

Post edited at 16:10
JJ Krammerhead III - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

absolutely! I've also been driving south through torridon to get to unclimbed hills - too peverse. Am enjoying lochs and rivers and taking up snorkelling as well as getting back to cragging 

Flinticus - on 15 May 2018
In reply to JJ Krammerhead III:

I promised myself that my next visit to the Cairngorms would simply be to camp somewhere out of the way and sit with my feet in cold water, throwing a stick for my dog.

JJ Krammerhead III - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

an excellent idea! 

Wanderer100 - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

> I promised myself that my next visit to the Cairngorms would simply be to camp somewhere out of the way and sit with my feet in cold water, throwing a stick for my dog.

Glen Luibeg will meet your needs.

no_more_scotch_eggs - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

65 to go for me after last weeks trip to the Cairngorms. I’ve decided that I will make a determined attempt to finish them over the next 10 years, and at 6 a year that seems realistic 

 

but too many were just ticked by the easiest route on reflection; so my plan is to try to do the ones that are left by more interesting means- last week included Ben Avon and beinn a bhuird but based from Faindouran bothy after an epic mountain bike approach hauling unfeasible amounts of coal, wine and whisky. It was, needless to say, a most enjoyable trip... 

 

still got fisherfield, Sgurr na ciche, Seana braigh and the fannaichs to go, so more mtb/bothy trips and perhaps even something involving sea kayaks, should keep it interesting...

Flinticus - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Wanderer100:

Yes indeed, that's where my return walk took me. Too beautiful to be rushing through to get back to the car (as back to work in the afternoon, in Glasgow)

girlymonkey - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

I have no idea how many I have done and have no intention of counting. Keeps hill days pressure free.

When I was preparing for my Winter ML, I spent 5 days a week for 2 months out in the winter hills. Every day was a new hill and I had criteria to meet every day to make it a QMD. When I passed the WML, it was very freeing to just head up a hill for the sake of it. I headed to Ben Vorlich, which I have done way more times than I could ever remember, I took the tourist path and just mindlessly walked up. It was great to not have to do anything in particular. I feel ticking munros would have a similar feel as WML prep to me!

Wanderer100 - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

I have about 95 left to finish off my round. I originally had ambitions of 5 years, then 10 and now I'm happy to tick off 3 or 4 new hills a year although when I get to finally retire(which won't be anytime before 2030) I hope to complete the final few dozen in a year or 2. I also hope to be back living in Scotland on a permanent basis by then.

Flinticus - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Wanderer100:

Retirement. Yeah, good time to knock them off assuming I'm still hill fit at 67! Maybe unemployment will strike first as my own replicant takes my job.

MG - on 15 May 2018
In reply to JJ Krammerhead III:

Can I join the incomplete too? 24 left  1 in 5 years! 

JJ Krammerhead III - on 15 May 2018
In reply to MG:

haha welcome aboard!

Dr.S at work - on 15 May 2018
In reply to MG:

Lightweight! I’ve still got 200 or so to go, I reckon on about 10 a year so many years of hill fun to be had. Living in the Deep South, and being car free, planning big rounds makes for some exciting logistics.....

Mal Grey - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

I've only got to just over a hundred, but long since decided I like going north of the Great Glen too much to spend my limited winter holidays in other areas, so whilst I'm getting up 2-5ish Munros a year, they're more often than not repeats! Add in an increasing love of travelling slowly, and I think I've got no hope...

 

 

Dave the Rave on 15 May 2018
In reply to no_more_scotch_eggs:

You’re in a similar boat to me.

ive got 99 left after amassing 160 odd in 12 years. The last six years have been pish with perhaps 24.

Its the distance(300 to Ft William), the kids and a loss of motivation. I do wonder sometimes why I started them. The plan was to do them pre 60 so hopefully I’ve got a good 12 years to get my arse moving.

Ive still got Fisherfoeld and the Lurg Mhor group to do as well as a lot of eastern Cairngorms.

On one memorable trip I took the train to Aviemore camped by the Bridge Inn, looked at the weather and fled home next day

 I’m hopefully going end of the month for 6 days so fingers crossed I get some done......

Good luck everyone!

Flinticus - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Dave the Rave:

Reminds me of a trip to Torridon. Drove up from Glasgow, slept in the car (too windy to pitch) and drove back the next day.

Post edited at 21:58
no_more_scotch_eggs - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Dave the Rave:

Yes my January trip to Newtonmore ended up with a solitary Corbett, as a foot of snow down to valley level and a Citroen c1 as transport left us unable even to get to the bottom of any Munros.

 

Board games, and plenty of good wine took the sting out of the disappointment though....

 

Hope the good weather lasts until your trip!

Deleted bagger - on 15 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

Do not despair Ed. Having a (relatively) new dog on board can distract ones focus. 

If it's any consolation I took 22 years to compleate the Munros. One year I manage no new addictions to my list. It was only when I reach the 200 mark did I realise that it was likely to happen but only if I knuckled down to the task. In one coordinated effort I knocked off 44 in 15 days and finished the rest the next year.

Tricadam on 15 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

60 to go in my case. I'm lucky in that I still have many of the best yet to come: two thirds of Skye, An Teallach, Beinn Eighe, The Saddle, Beinn Sgritheall, a couple in Knoydart and the whole Beinn Dearg group (except Seana Bhraigh). I'm in no hurry - and discovering hill running has now made previously unattractive Corbetts, Grahams and Marilyns look enticing too! 

Toccata on 16 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

50 or so to go. Takes as long to get to the Alps as the Highlands which has somewhat slowed progress. My plan is to do them in summer and winter before I claim the tick. Winter trips can be highly productive (skiing around Braemar) or largely alcohol based (Skye in a storm). I suppose it's the journey that counts.

paul-1970 - on 16 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

I was racing through my munro tally in my 20s and early 30s. Then in the early 2000s, I did the glorious Glenfinnan - Inverie backpack. My plan was to climb multiple munros en route. In the event, I found I was having a much better and happier time concentrating on the glens, lochs, forests, bothies, etc. And that kind of ethos overcame, informed and influenced my future wanders into the wilds.

I'm up at about 150 munros now. I'm not even entirely sure of the precise number as some summits I haven't marked up. The total meanders upwards lazily at a rate of less than 10 a year, so completion (or 'compleation') is only likely if I shift my mindset and priorities in my normal life. 

Flinticus - on 16 May 2018
In reply to paul-1970:

> In the event, I found I was having a much better and happier time concentrating on the glens, lochs, forests, bothies, etc. And that kind of ethos overcame, informed and influenced my future wanders into the wilds.

> ... if I shift my mindset and priorities in my normal life. 

Sounds like your current priorities are where mine are shifting to. I think this last walk has helped crystallise this. I think I'll still aim for about 3/4 each year.  Some are still grouped fairly close so should be achievable.

Alan Breck on 17 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

But is that your first round or perhaps your tenth or so...........if so nae sympathy;)

I managed to finish them long long ago and I'm not doing another round!

Thought that the Corbetts were doing reasonably well BUT as I'm now a fair weather walker I found that Corbett bashing in the far North West was costing me about £300.00 per Corbett. Not sustainable.

So now I've got another Husky that will, in due course, drag me up (hopefully) and down (accident waiting to happen) the occasional new hill.

Trust that you're enjoying having a dog again & best of luck with whatever round it is. Hamish managed the In Pin with a collie so you can as well!.

 

 

aln - on 17 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

I did about 40 in 4/5 years. The next 10 took the same time again, now it's one every few years. 

Dom Connaway - on 18 May 2018
In reply to no_more_scotch_eggs:

Re Fisherfield: you might like to pick a dry spell then camp at the far end, after Being Tarsuin.  Superb view of Slioch and you avoid the crush at Shenavall. Worked for me.

Dom Connaway - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

Having just this year got back to the Munro's after a couple of years off I'm finding that a combination of tent, MTB and creative thinking is working wonders. Does require more planning time, though...

Flinticus - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Alan Breck:

I'm kinda working on the corbetts too. Great hills: less people on them, a bit wilder. Up at 111 now so half done.

My last trip just there cost about £110 for hire car, fuel and car insurance.

I have Ben Avon left in the Cairngorms and will probably dial it back to a less ambitious trip time wise. Two days rather than one. 

Post edited at 12:41
Dave the Rave on 18 May 2018
In reply to Dom Connaway:

> Re Fisherfield: you might like to pick a dry spell then camp at the far end, after Being Tarsuin.  Superb view of Slioch and you avoid the crush at Shenavall. Worked for me.

Where did you walk in from Dom? Did you do it the hills in 1 go or camp up on the ridge ?

Dom Connaway - on 20 May 2018
In reply to Dave the Rave:

I walked in from the north, passing Shenavall, then down the ridge and camped on the edge of the hags under Beinn Tarsuin. Returned over the western hills next day. Lovely trip. The reason I mentioned a dry spell was that the moor where I camped has a fierce rep for bogginess but was bone dry and very easy when I was there.

 

john irving - on 20 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

First 100 3 years

second 100 5 years

next 60 25 years

finishing.... one day

Tricadam on 22 May 2018
In reply to Dom Connaway:

Also re Fisherfield, the north shore of Fuar Loch Beag (nestled into the NW side of A'Mhaighdean) near its outlet is an idyllic wild camping spot. My pal and I slept two nights there a few years ago. An added attraction is Maiden Buttress, on the same side of the loch: a contender for the remotest crag on the mainland and home to some fine low-grade routes, as well as a superb vantage point to watch the sunset. We humped a rope and some gear all the way in and all the way over the Munros on the way back!

Deleted bagger - on 22 May 2018
In reply to Tricadam:

> Also re Fisherfield, the north shore of Fuar Loch Beag (nestled into the NW side of A'Mhaighdean) near its outlet is an idyllic wild camping spot.

I'll second that. Camped there in spring and winter. Lovely spot.

 

Dave Hewitt - on 22 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

Taking 20-25 years to do a round of Munros is pretty common and feels quite a civilised span - although I would say that, having taken a month under 25 years from first to "last". There's a modern tendency to rush round them all by the easiest routes in five years or so -  the trip reports on sites such as Walkhighlands provide ample evidence of that - and although some people have always taken that approach it feels like it's on the increase. Whether that's a good or bad thing (or more likely somewhere between) is hard to assess - so much comes down to personal situations and attitudes - but there's not much doubt that doing a round of Munros fairly fast is easier than it used to be given that so many aspects of the game are easier than they were 25 or 30 years ago.
 
For the record I got off to a brisk start with 240 in ten years, then became becalmed (in part due to In Pinn anxiety) and only added three new ones (plus the 1997 additions from the armchair as I'd already been on them) over the next dozen years. Then managed the In Pinn and duly added the remaining 35 over three years. I was climbing Munros throughout this 25-year period - completion came on my 1000th one overall - but the actual progress towards a round was somewhat erratic. 
 
The one thing I would say in terms of general advice is not to leave it too late to tidy up loose ends / awkward remote ones. In retrospect I'm glad I finished in my mid-40s - if I was still chipping away at them now (mid/late-50s) I'd probably still be able to do them but it would be physically harder. Having said that, I know someone who is making steady Corbett progress (75-80 to do) and he's aged 75.
Stuart S - on 27 May 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

I climbed my first Munro in 1981 at the tender age of 10 in the company of my dad, and over the next 15 years or so, got myself up to nearly 200.  Then I discovered rock climbing and only did the odd new Munro over the next 20 years.  Last year though, I realised that I'm now older than dad was when he finished, so I've started making a more determined effort to finish them off myself.  No definite timescale - just cherry picking good weather days, as and when.  Off to Ben Alder tomorrow - hoping I don't melt in the sun!

Fidget - on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to no_more_scotch_eggs:

I did Seana Braighe this weekend, from the north, with a bike approach and scrambling up the Ridge of Doom in a thunderstorm. That was a fairly interesting day...

Pids - on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to Fidget:

> I did Seana Braighe this weekend, from the north, with a bike approach and scrambling up the Ridge of Doom in a thunderstorm. That was a fairly interesting day...

Easy enough day? - always fancied that route, without the thunderstorm hopefully.

Roughly how long does it take? (car to car)

felt - on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to Flinticus:

After an initial very keen spell, I have done none in over ten years, so by my calculations at that rate the rest will take me over infinity years.

Simon Caldwell - on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to Pids:

We drove as far as you're allowed (time of year dependent), ie Corriemulzie Lodge. From there it took 7.5 hours round trip.

no_more_scotch_eggs - on 13 Jun 2018
In reply to Fidget:

Like many I’ve had an eye on that ridge- how does it compare in difficulty/exposure/commitment to scrambles like the forcan ridge, Aonach eagach..? 

Simon Caldwell - on 14 Jun 2018
In reply to no_more_scotch_eggs:

It's very different to all those others, more of it is on grass than on rock. It felt quite serious as a result, though it's technically a lot easier. Though it was damp when we did it, it may feel less precarious if you find it dry.

Tricadam on 16 Jun 2018
In reply to no_more_scotch_eggs:

> Like many I’ve had an eye on that ridge- how does it compare in difficulty/exposure/commitment to scrambles like the forcan ridge, Aonach eagach..? 

It's good in winter. Around grade II if you take it all direct.

Worth saying though that you won't be able to take the car as far as the lodge. We were able to park maybe a mile before the Schoolhouse bothy, if I remember rightly. 

Post edited at 09:30
malky_c - on 16 Jun 2018
In reply to no_more_scotch_eggs:

Easy enough in the dry. I seem to remember an exposed grassy move down was the hardest bit - as pointed out, that could seem way worse in wet conditions. Great position though.

no_more_scotch_eggs - on 16 Jun 2018
In reply to malky_c:

<shudders>

exposed moves on slippy grass... just the sort of thing that makes me break into a cold sweat....!

 

malky_c - on 16 Jun 2018
In reply to no_more_scotch_eggs:

I wouldn't let that put you off if the conditions are good.

Simon Caldwell - on 17 Jun 2018
In reply to Tricadam:

> Worth saying though that you won't be able to take the car as far as the lodge

Has that changed recently? When we did it 3 years ago you were permitted to drive to the lodge - where there was even a walkers' car park provided - between about April and the start of stalking season.

Tricadam on 25 Jun 2018
In reply to Simon Caldwell:

> > Worth saying though that you won't be able to take the car as far as the lodge

> Has that changed recently? When we did it 3 years ago you were permitted to drive to the lodge - where there was even a walkers' car park provided - between about April and the start of stalking season.

It sounds like it's not a problem in summer. This was winter though. When I go back, I'll give the estate a call! Quite fancy a night or two in the bothy just below Seana Bhraigh as a base for some of the winter routes.


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