Loading Notifications...

Cliff Camping?

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
 Mike505 15 Oct 2020

Just seen the news (BBC), apparently cliff camping is now a thing. Looks like some unfortunate reporter spent some time on a portaledge at Portland.

Seems an odd concept, and I do wonder if interested parties consider the toileting situation, i.e needing to drop the kids off at the pool in the morning, then realising there are climbers adjacent to you.

I think I'd rather just camp out on a beach tbh, though I guess for many it might be a novel experience.

Post edited at 09:21
4
 mik82 15 Oct 2020
In reply to Mike505:

Could be an interesting spot to camp given the number of dog turds that people seem to throw over the edge of the cliffs there.

 nikoid 15 Oct 2020
In reply to Mike505:

I imagine for most people it would be a novel experience for about an hour, then they'd want to do something else. 

1
 lithos 15 Oct 2020
In reply to Mike505:

Gaia Adventures in Snowdonia have been running this for a few years at Gogarth (i think) with quite some success and major publicity, good on em for spotting a market, and this team

 Mike505 15 Oct 2020
In reply to lithos:

Portaledges on the big G, an XS experience for all the family.

In reply to Mike505:

I've seen them when climbing at Rhoscolyn. Easy to set up and not too intimidating there. I must say, I do like the idea of having pizza delivered to your portaledge.

 Philoosh 15 Oct 2020
In reply to Mike505:

I saw that this morning and was more concerned for the people in the portaledge under Blacknor cliff. It is well known that the local dog walkers throw stuff (hmmmm) off and I've also seen the odd washing machine / trailer down on the cliff face.

I'd also like to know if it allowed by the Portland council or even if they know people are doing it ?

Does whoever organises it pay for insurance, Dorset bolt fund etc ?

Post edited at 12:43
2
In reply to Philoosh:

It was hosted by a well established local company with 15+years experience climbing on Portland. The use of any fixed gear (if applicable) would be no different to any other instructor led activities on the crag. The presenter said on film he didn't atually stay the night so not sure why the council would be intrested at all?

Incidentally, in Yosemite, unless the rules have changed nights spent on the wall are exempt from any restrictions that apply in valley. Perhaps Portland Council would take a similar view ;-)

Post edited at 17:40
 Lankyman 15 Oct 2020
In reply to Sandstone Stickman:

> Perhaps Portland Council would take a similar view ;-)

Perhaps a Portland portaledge portaloo?

 Cobra_Head 15 Oct 2020
In reply to Lankyman:

> Perhaps a Portland portaledge portaloo?


possibly.

 mondite 15 Oct 2020
In reply to Philoosh:

> I saw that this morning and was more concerned for the people in the portaledge under Blacknor cliff. It is well known that the local dog walkers throw stuff (hmmmm) off and I've also seen the odd washing machine / trailer down on the cliff face.

extreme (or just very smelly) camping then?

 Nic 16 Oct 2020
In reply to mik82:

That has got to be the worst place on the whole of Portland to do that...you'd be lucky with dog turds, more likely rocks, bottles or car parts...I didn't name these routes for nothingIsle of Slingers (6c+)Shallow End of the Gene Pool (6b+)Car Parts, Bottles and Cutlery (6b+)

 peppermill 16 Oct 2020
In reply to Mike505:

What a crock of sh*t that story was. 

Does anyone actually do that in the UK, other than testing kit/technique before heading away bigwalling?

3
 Darron 16 Oct 2020
In reply to Lankyman:

> Perhaps a Portland portaledge portaloo? Positioned for a post party poo poo?

In reply to peppermill:

> What a crock of sh*t that story was. 

> Does anyone actually do that in the UK, other than testing kit/technique before heading away bigwalling?

It's one way for desperate outdoor companies to get a bit of income. Safe thrills for people with money. What's not to like? (We practised our portaledge technique by spending a night on it in the local climbing wall - but everything still went to shit the first time we deployed it for real!)

In reply to Andy Clarke:

> It's one way for desperate outdoor companies to get a bit of income. Safe thrills for people with money. What's not to like?

Assuming it's the same bloke, certainly pre-COVID, when he was doing this, he was far from desperate. In high demand, actually, for super-technical stuff. He's a 'proper' climber (E5, F8a+, The Nose, etc) that I can assure everybody.

The clientele aren't people getting ready for big walls. They're salaried, middle-class types who want a bit of a (super-safe!) thrill and some juicy photos. Same with coasteering. It's not my cup of tea but that's hardly the point. If they have a good time and a fellow climber makes a living (so he can afford to go climbing), then where's the harm?

Mick

1
 SteveX 16 Oct 2020
In reply to Mike505:

I seem to remember on Countryfile or maybe the prog that Ray Mears started on that two people, Women I think, maybe Julia Bradbury camped on a portaledge, near a Fog Horn.

This could be 25- 30 years ago

Edit, probably Tracks on BBC

Post edited at 22:47
In reply to Mike505:

The thing that would worry me is random bits of loose rock falling off and hitting the tent or people kicking stuff over the top of the cliff for a laugh.


This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.