UKC

Diversity in The Lakes

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 BRILLBRUM 07 Jun 2021

Spent most of last week in and around The Lakes with the family for half term, some walking/bimbling around, a little scrambling, a lot of eating and relaxing in the sun.

Two distinct things of note, firstly THE SUN SHONE and my god it was glorious, after 11 years of Feb HT hols in The Lakes this was a revelation and a welcome one at that. My kids think I've been conning them all their lives that the mountains are a great place to be!

Second and most importantly was the huge diversity in people whilst I was there, noticeably so. This was true in the main tourist areas but also in the hills and on the water. This may be partly the impact of COVID on peoples ability to go abroad/the freak sunshine/a heartfelt urge to see more than the four walls of home and your local city or town. All the same it was great to see and I would also hope as a result of a change of personal attitudes and the great work I've read about on here from interest groups promoting diversity and inclusivity in the outdoors/countryside.

In reply to BRILLBRUM:

I was up for one day and noticed exact same.  

 Lankyman 07 Jun 2021
In reply to BRILLBRUM:

Diversity are cr@p! Susan Boyle should have won that year.

 Timmd 07 Jun 2021
In reply to Lankyman:

Interesting to see the 4 dislikes.

 Lankyman 07 Jun 2021
In reply to Timmd:

> Interesting to see the 4 dislikes.

Diehard SuBo fans?

In reply to BRILLBRUM:

The one in diversity with the twigg anorexic legs and the huge hair once gave my daughter a dance lesson while we were at Butlins Bognor Regis a few years ago. Susan Boyle on the other hand has done absolutely FK all for my family. And there rests my case!

 felt 08 Jun 2021
In reply to Timmd:

> Interesting to see the 4 dislikes.

There's good diversity and then there's this diversity.

https://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/19195795.outrage-illegal-campers-leave-abandoned-tents-thirlmere-lake-district/

Maybe the dislikes are for this second type.

J1234 08 Jun 2021
In reply to BRILLBRUM:

I wonder if the villages in and around The Lakes are ready for those diverse people to live there, or just come as customers, then once the wallets are empty, to clear off ASAP.

 Groundhog 08 Jun 2021
In reply to felt:

https://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/19195795.outrage-illegal-campers-leave-abandoned-tents-thirlmere-lake-district/ 

The one tiny gimmer of hope I take from reports like this is that the scum always leave their tents behind. Perhaps they have no intention of coming back?

In reply to Groundhog:

> The one tiny gimmer of hope I take from reports like this is that the scum always leave their tents behind. Perhaps they have no intention of coming back?

They just factor it into the cost. A few cheap tents from Argos or Halfords are much cheaper than a week in Aya Napa.

 Timmd 08 Jun 2021
In reply to felt:

I'm not aware of any interest groups aiming at promoting diversity in people randomly camping in rural areas., but I am where it's racial diversity. 

Post edited at 15:12
 Lankyman 08 Jun 2021
In reply to Groundhog:

> The one tiny gimmer of hope

Better than the Pavey Ark of Pain. Or the Dow of Despair.

 felt 08 Jun 2021
In reply to Timmd:

Like me, the dislikers possibly didn't read right to the end of the OP. Diversity has an everyday as well as an esoteric meaning.

 Tom V 08 Jun 2021
In reply to felt:

People use "diversity" as and when it suits their purpose. 

I welcome diversity in my garden to the extent that I enjoy grey squirrels  and if there was a stream there i would love to see mink there as a slice of nature, but my version of diversity is a step too far for most people who would rather qualify it with exceptions. 

 Lankyman 08 Jun 2021
In reply to Tom V:

> I welcome diversity in my garden to the extent that I enjoy grey squirrels  and if there was a stream there i would love to see mink there as a slice of nature, but my version of diversity is a step too far for most people who would rather qualify it with exceptions. 

How would you feel about alligators in your garden stream ...... ?

In reply to Tom V:

The point with grey squirrels and mink is they drive down diversity, not increase it.

The point with invasive non-native species is not the non-native bit (my garden has plenty, lovely things they are too) but the invasive bit. I'll happy stick a non-native plant in my garden then I go out to work some days and kill rhododendron ponticum. Sadly you can't have R ponticum and oakwoods in the west or North.

Dame goes for mink (ground nesting birds, water vole) or grey squirrels (red squirrels, passerines) .

Anyway don't me a to hijack the thread, was about to get hot under the collar about something else.

Cheers 

Post edited at 20:10
Message Removed 08 Jun 2021
Reason: inappropriate content
In reply to Tom V:

P. S. I'd like to start a thread when I've time on invasive species, your post has raised a really important issue but it needs a separate post because it is important and also talking about it on a this thread conflate different species and different demographics of people which I'm sure you'd agree is more than a little uncomfortable. Hope to see you there. 

 Tom V 09 Jun 2021
In reply to Lankyman:

> How would you feel about alligators in your garden stream ...... ?

Wary. 

Post edited at 09:19
 Tom V 09 Jun 2021
In reply to JJ Krammerhead III:

Looking forward to it and, yes, it might turn out a little uncomfotrable.

 pec 10 Jun 2021
In reply to Lankyman:

> How would you feel about alligators in your garden stream ...... ?


I once stopped on a campsite that had alligators in the pond in the middle of it. Oddly, I was not too worried to by this.

 Timmd 11 Jun 2021
In reply to pec:

> I once stopped on a campsite that had alligators in the pond in the middle of it. Oddly, I was not too worried to by this.

I guess the thing to do is to camp at the edges, with people between the alligators and one's camping spot. 

Edit: I'd not wish death by alligator upon anybody, of course...

Post edited at 15:53
 Hardonicus 11 Jun 2021
In reply to BRILLBRUM:

There's less diversity than In North Wales, but you've still got Borrowdale volcanics, slate, limestone and sandstone to go at.

 Lankyman 11 Jun 2021
In reply to Hardonicus:

> There's less diversity than In North Wales, but you've still got Borrowdale volcanics, slate, limestone and sandstone to go at.

What about Eskdale granite? I can't think of any in Wales. You can't just lump all Lakes slates together either - there's the Silurian stuff and there's the volcanic stuff too.

 pec 13 Jun 2021
In reply to Timmd:

> I guess the thing to do is to camp at the edges, with people between the alligators and one's camping spot. 

The thing was though that the alligators came and went from the pond by walking through the campsite from a stream which flowed along the side of it. In retrospect I probably should have been quite concerned but at the time I remember thinking that if they let you camp there it can't be too dangerous.

 fred99 10:49 Mon
In reply to Timmd:

> Edit: I'd not wish death by alligator upon anybody, of course...

Nobody ?

Not even Johnson, Trump, Farage, .......

After all, even alligators have to eat.

In reply to pec:

I once camped by a lake in Kenya where the hippos came out and grazed among your tents after dark. I made sure I had a piss bottle in my tent at night for that one...

Post edited at 11:15
In reply to ChrisBrooke:

> I once camped by a lake in Kenya where the hippos came out and grazed among your tents after dark. I made sure I had a piss bottle in my tent at night for that one...

Do piss bottles repel hippos, and stop them crushing you and your tent?

In reply to Ridge:

Nope, but they stop you having to bump into them in the night on your way to the bog.

In reply to Lankyman:

Volcanic  slate? That’s a new one on me, Carl.

 pec 21:45 Mon
In reply to ChrisBrooke:

> I once camped by a lake in Kenya where the hippos came out and grazed among your tents after dark. I made sure I had a piss bottle in my tent at night for that one...


I was young enough not to need to pee during the night when I camped on the "alligator campsite". The prosoect of stumbling over an alligator in the dark doesn't bear thinking about!

 Lankyman 08:53 Tue
In reply to Rog Wilko:

> Volcanic  slate? That’s a new one on me, Carl.

I think the slates in the Borrowdale Volcanics (like at Elterwater or Kirkstone) were ash deposited into water? Unlike the Silurian slates which are sedimentary. I might be talking complete geological bolleaux but that's what seems to stick in my mind from various guidebooks.

In reply to Lankyman:

I thought all slates were metamorphic? In this case volcanic ash subject to heat and pressure?

 Lankyman 16:33 Tue
In reply to Ridge:

> I thought all slates were metamorphic? In this case volcanic ash subject to heat and pressure?

You may be right? I don't know for sure. In the south east of the Lakes the rock is Silurian 'slate' which is very different to the slate found in the central, volcanic fells. I think going further east again you get the same (or similar) rock making up the Howgills and other nearby hills like Whinfell and Middleton Fell. I'm not sure how these 'slates' formed but you can't split them into thin sheets like real slates. I may have seen them referred to as mudstones or siltstones somewhere in print. If volcanic ash does fall into water and settle into layers is it sedimentary or metamorphic? Are there any slateologists on UKC?

In reply to Lankyman:

> If volcanic ash does fall into water and settle into layers is it sedimentary or metamorphic? 

I would say sedimentary, but I think there may be a special category for what you describe. Some of that banded rock you find around Pike o’Blisco was created in that way I think.

As for your Silurian slates I think they are so called (erroneously?) because they are fissile and not because they underwent metamorphism. They may be more like the notorious greywacke you find at places like Meikle Ross.

 Webster 21:13 Tue
In reply to Lankyman:

i dont know specifically what the units are in the lakes, but yes, you can get volcaniclastic slates and bog standard slates. so what you say makes sense geologically speaking.

In reply to Ridge:

Yes slate is metamorphic mudstone, but that mud can come from a veriety of sources, including volcanic deposits.

In reply to anybody who cares!

a large geological unit i.e. the borrowdale volcanics will include more than just 1 rock type. the dominant rock type will define the unit, but you often get minor sequences within the over arching 'unit'. so its perfectly possible o find 'normal' slate within the borrowdale volcanics as well, just to complicate things!

 Webster 21:23 Tue
In reply to Lankyman:

> If volcanic ash does fall into water and settle into layers is it sedimentary or metamorphic? Are there any slateologists on UKC?

it is a volcaniclastic sediment. Anything formed by deposition (mechanical or chemical) is classed as sedimentary rock. the parent material can be volcanic, but the rock type is sedimentary. That volcaniclastic sedimentary rock can then become metamorphosed by any of the metamorphic proccesses to form a new rock type, which, depending on the proccess may still show the characteristics of the original volcanic sediment, so you have a rock which is in effect all three rock types!


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