/ Dog whistles

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el diablo 07 Jan 2020

I’m thinking of using a whistle with my 20 week old Irish terrier pup. Anybody use one with their dog? What frequency should I be trying?

Thanks

j

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Oceanrower 08 Jan 2020
In reply to el diablo:

> What frequency should I be trying?

Quite often...

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Fozzy 08 Jan 2020
In reply to el diablo:

I use an Acme 210.5 with my working spaniel (1 blast to stop immediately, 2 to quarter/change direction, 3 for recall). If you incorporate it into their basic training alongside the parallel verbal and/or hand command, they should hopefully get the idea. Good luck, and hopefully your terrier listens more than mine does! 

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Dave Garnett 08 Jan 2020
In reply to el diablo:

Just about to start using one with ours (fostering two 10 week old fox hounds).  Never used one before, never had a dog before, what could possibly go wrong? 

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Fozzy 08 Jan 2020
In reply to Dave Garnett:

Good luck with them! From the experience of friends who’ve puppy walked for local hunts, both foxhounds and beagles, you’ll be lucky to have any sanity left at all when they go back! 

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Dave the Rave 08 Jan 2020
In reply to el diablo:

If it’s like my previous Border Terriers, then very good luck.

You can whistle, you can shout, you can scream but no one will here you.

Once mine had that bloodlust the only thing to stop them was to learn to run faster, for longer and learn to dive like Gordon Banks.

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Deadeye 08 Jan 2020
In reply to el diablo:

> I’m thinking of using a whistle with my 20 week old Irish terrier pup. Anybody use one with their dog? What frequency should I be trying?

Ask Kenneth

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Dave Garnett 08 Jan 2020
In reply to Fozzy:

> Good luck with them! From the experience of friends who’ve puppy walked for local hunts, both foxhounds and beagles, you’ll be lucky to have any sanity left at all when they go back! 

They are quite sweet when they are not trying to kill each other.  

Fortunately we can put them out in the stable to give ourselves some space to get some work done but house training is still a challenge.

As is teaching them that hens are unlikely to survive the sort of play-fighting they spend most of their waking hours inflicting on each other...

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Andy Gamisou 09 Jan 2020
In reply to Dave the Rave:

> Once mine had that bloodlust the only thing to stop them was to learn to run faster, for longer and learn to dive like Gordon Banks.

Or to reference a more contemporary player, Cristiano Ronaldo.

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Shaunhaynes99 09 Jan 2020
In reply to el diablo:

I dont think frequency  matters. I thoughtthey were number to make sure you can buy the same one. 

Whistle training is no harder then normal training as the dog will respond to the sound the same as a word. 

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Hat Dude 09 Jan 2020
In reply to Dave Garnett:

>(fostering two 10 week old fox hounds). 

Off topic but I used to do the local Parkrun and there was a woman who used to run with a foxhound on a waist belt

I've never seen such blatent cheating, the dog was constantly striving to be at the front of the pack so all she had to do was keep picking her feet up and gthe dog provided all forward momentum.

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EdS 09 Jan 2020
In reply to el diablo:

Nope......we don't use them for our working spaniels. 

Learn to whistle /call yourself. Dog whistles are good....right up until you loose it. See that happen all too often. Result confused dogs.

Post edited at 09:55
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captain paranoia 09 Jan 2020
In reply to el diablo:

No-one suggested asking Trump, Johnson or Farage for advice yet...?

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Fozzy 09 Jan 2020
In reply to EdS:

Main whistle hung by the front door. Spare in my shooting coat pocket, spare in the truck, spare in the gamebag, spare in whatever other pocket I tend to dip my hand into. I’m considering getting shares in Acme...

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EdS 09 Jan 2020
In reply to Fozzy:

To be fair the old girl (lost last year) was the brains of the team, flushing dogs rather than picking up. Just used to tell her to get on at start of day and no other commands really need.

She taught her son well.... me, I just follow and supply the treats and carry any picked up stuff.

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Bulls Crack 11 Jan 2020
In reply to EdS:

> and carry any picked up stuff.

like?

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girlymonkey 11 Jan 2020
In reply to Hat Dude: 

> Off topic but I used to do the local Parkrun and there was a woman who used to run with a foxhound on a waist belt

> I've never seen such blatent cheating, the dog was constantly striving to be at the front of the pack so all she had to do was keep picking her feet up and gthe dog provided all forward momentum.

I don't think you understand how hard it is! It's a sport all of its own called canicross. If I haven't canicrossed for a while, my thighs and abs are agony after. The impact on your body is much higher and your legs are forced to move quicker than you naturally would. Yes, it will look easy if you do it a lot, but so does anything.

It's only cheating if it's a race, which I believe park run is not meant to be at all!

I don't do park run, the only group stuff I do is with local canicrossers, but I believe doing park run on canicross is quite common. You will also find that many of the Strava segments are topped by canicross. It's not our fault if they don't give the option to record it separately! I got a CR today on a segment (pushed a fellow canicross runner off the top spot), there's no way I would if running solo.

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The Lemming 11 Jan 2020
In reply to el diablo:

I just use my mouth to whistle for my dogs. I taught both of them to return to me after two sharp blasts.

The theory was that if they got too far away then I could call them back with whistling. The theory worked, because as puppies they would go further away than I could shout and they came back to me.

Also, they would develop selective deafness for my voice when it suited them, but never the whistling.

Edit

My first dog was a Border Colly. Exceptionally intelligent and highly obedient.

My current pooch is a Patterdale Terrier. Exceptionally intelligent however fekin stubborn. I think with the reputation of the most stubborn dog breed going. However he comes back every time should I have to whistle him back.

Post edited at 22:58
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Timmd 11 Jan 2020
In reply to The Lemming: It was a revelation for me when I discovered dogs can have selective deafness about responding to requests (commands). It ended up in a face off between me and a dog, in sitting in the doorway she had to leave through and calling her until she came. I didn't want it to pop up during a critical moment.  

Post edited at 23:28
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The Lemming 12 Jan 2020
In reply to Timmd:

I'm guessing that selective deftness evolved/transferred from dogs to male humans.

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Ridge 12 Jan 2020
In reply to Timmd:

> It was a revelation for me when I discovered dogs can have selective deafness about responding to requests (commands).

You've clearly never met a lurcher. They have special valve in the ear that closes when they see something interesting.

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EdS 12 Jan 2020
In reply to Bulls Crack:

Well, he (they were) working Springer spaniels

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Queenie 12 Jan 2020
In reply to Hat Dude:

It's a totally separate kind of run, so not cheating. We're not under the illusion that we're better than any dogless runner that we pass. Does it really sting when you eat our dust then? 

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Timmd 23:20 Sun
In reply to Ridge:

> You've clearly never met a lurcher. They have special valve in the ear that closes when they see something interesting.

That sounds like it could be endearing, annoying or worrying, depends on the circumstances. I like how intelligent border collies are, I'm guessing with them it'd be obvious enough when they're ignoring you.

Post edited at 23:21
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