UKC

/ Good stuff, Mr Speaker!

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Greenbanks - on 27 Mar 2018
Big Ger - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

Sexism? 

If he had called Sir Christopher Nugee, "Mr Thornburry" would that be sexist too??

What utter piffle.

35
Greenbanks - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

Oh dear.

What's life like in Victorian England?

9
Welsh Kate - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

Saw that earlier and thought it was one of JB's better telling-offs. Well deserved too, BJ was being a dismissive and patronising git.

10
Jon Stewart - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> If he had called Sir Christopher Nugee, "Mr Thornburry" would that be sexist too??

He wouldn't have done it, which is the point.

 

1
Pursued by a bear - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

Terrific.  The more that people - well, men - are called out on this sort of thing, the better.

T.

 

12
The Lemming - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Pursued by a bear:

> Terrific.  The more that people - well, men - are called out on this sort of thing, the better.

> T.


You are a sexist.  And I claim my £5

10
Pursued by a bear - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to The Lemming:

Sorry, I'm a genderist.  And I suspect you have an agenda.

T.

That's a fiver saved...

3
Greenbanks - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Pursued by a bear:

An agender, surely?

Pursued by a bear - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

Possibly even an agender agenda.

T.

The Lemming - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Pursued by a bear:

 

> That's a fiver saved...

 

I still stand by my request for the fiver.  You are welcome to point out where you were not being sexist and I will give your five pounds to charity.

 

I could of course fix your statement with the odd omission if you prefer?

> Terrific.  The more that people are called out on this sort of thing, the better.

 

 

6
TMM on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Pursued by a bear:

> Terrific.  The more that people - well, men - are called out on this sort of thing, the better.

> T.

https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2017/02/watch-theresa-may-puts-lady-nugee-place/

Interesting that Theresa May was not described as 'sexist' when she called Emily Thornberry 'Lady Nugee'.

Pursued by a bear - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to The Lemming:

No, I stand by my words.  The exceptions serve only to prove the rule.

T.

wercat on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to TMM:

> Interesting that Theresa May was not described as 'sexual' when she called Emily Thornberry 'Lady Nugee'.

golly

Tyler - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to TMM:

> Interesting that Theresa May was not described as 'sexist' when she called Emily Thornberry 'Lady Nugee'.

The sexist part of the reprimand was only a small aside in the rebuke, Johnson was mainly being called out for being a dick. May was also being a dick which is why she grudgingly apologised without the need for intervention from the speaker and there was, therefore, no need to debate whether it was also sexist or not. 

3
Philip on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

But it wasn't meant to be sexist, it was meant to be offensive in other ways. They call her Lady Nugee because it makes her sound posh and disconnected, its a barbed comment for a labour MP. In fact what if anything is sexist is that the wives of Knights are given a title, Lady, but the husband's of Dame's aren't. I don't mean sexist against men, I mean sexist as in patronising to women to group them by their husbands achievement.

Interestingly they modernised this once before in C17th moving from Dame to Lady. Why anything, should stay Mrs/Ms. Obviously if the women is awarded it she would still be Dame.

1
Timmd on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> Sexism? 

> If he had called Sir Christopher Nugee, "Mr Thornburry" would that be sexist too??

> What utter piffle.

To call it utter piffle, one would have to overlook the fact that woman have routinely been referred to as X's wife, rather than individuals in their own right*.

*...and fairly often still are, in the media.  

He never would be called Mr Thornbury.

Post edited at 18:11
2
Greenbanks - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Timmd:

Never mind the media: some antediluvian family members still address letters to Mrs (My First Name) Greenbanks.

1
FactorXXX - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

Typical of the BBC to show the edited version and not include the bit when Boris humbly apologised to Thornberry by saying "Sorry love, won't happen again".

FactorXXX - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> What utter piffle.

Pfeffel surely?

 

 

FactorXXX - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

I bet Boris loved being told off like a naughty school boy as it reminded him of Eton and the expected spankings...

3
Big Ger - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Philip:

> But it wasn't meant to be sexist, it was meant to be offensive in other ways. They call her Lady Nugee because it makes her sound posh and disconnected, its a barbed comment for a labour MP.

But, in fact, she is Lady Nugee, and she maintains her Thornburry Maiden name to be down with the poor folk...

 

 

16
Big Ger - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Timmd:

> To call it utter piffle, one would have to overlook the fact that woman have routinely been referred to as X's wife, rather than individuals in their own right*.

But that's not what Boris did. He referred to her by her title, one she gained when she married Lord Nugee

 

 

8
Big Ger - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

> Oh dear.

> What's life like in Victorian England?

Wonderful, please throw another peasant on the fire for me.

 

15
Timmd on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> But that's not what Boris did. He referred to her by her title, one she gained when she married Lord Nugee

But she has chosen to use her maiden name in politics, to differentiate herself from her husband. So, her being called X's wife, and Mrs Bugee, are, in this context I think, broadly comparable.

It could appear John Burcow(sp) and the people who applauded him seemed to think so too, what with sexism being  mentioned and receiving applause . 

I've eggs to go and eat, and stuff to do, but that's how I see it. 

 

 

Post edited at 19:24
1
Timmd on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> But, in fact, she is Lady Nugee, and she maintains her Thornburry Maiden name to be down with the poor folk...

What about Yvette Cooper, what would her reason be for keeping her maiden name?

Post edited at 19:27
MG - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Timmd:

> What about Yvette Cooper?

Is she a lady too? 

Timmd on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to MG:

You know she isn't, don't you?

Either you're being obtuse or you don't know what I'm getting at. ;-)

( Have a good evening, peeps. )

Post edited at 19:30
Stuart en Écosse - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Philip:

> Interestingly they modernised this once before in C17th moving from Dame to Lady.

The wider context here being that for Britain, the 17th century is still modern.

FactorXXX - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Timmd:

> What about Yvette Cooper, what would her reason be for keeping her maiden name?

She couldn't afford a personalised number plate?

summo on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Timmd:

> What about Yvette Cooper, what would her reason be for keeping her maiden name?

Her husband is political marmite, or toxic? 

Post edited at 20:31
3
summo on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> But, in fact, she is Lady Nugee, and she maintains her Thornburry Maiden name to be down with the poor folk...

When she isn't actually slagging off white van drivers for having an England flag on their house. 

7
Rob Exile Ward on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

He seems genuinely offended. There's a subtext; what is it?

FactorXXX - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Rob Exile Ward:

> He seems genuinely offended. There's a subtext; what is it?

He's on the telly?

Martin Hore - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> But, in fact, she is Lady Nugee, and she maintains her Thornburry Maiden name to be down with the poor folk...


I think you'll find that she became entitled to be called Lady Nugee when her husband received a knighthood. I think it's perfectly reasonable to decide not to use the title in those circumstances. The title makes neither her nor her husband any more aristocratic than Mo Farah or Bradley Wiggins.

As for choosing to keep your maiden name on marriage, that's perfectly acceptable I would have thought. To argue otherwise is surely sexist.

Martin

 

summo on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Martin Hore:

> I think you'll find that she became entitled to be called Lady Nugee when her husband received a knighthood. I think it's perfectly reasonable to decide not to use the title in those circumstances. The title makes neither her nor her husband any more aristocratic than Mo Farah or Bradley Wiggins.

I'd suggest being both an MP and a lady carries some weight when it comes to a large corporation wanting to put you on it's books as a director etc.. or paid advisor. Sports stars bring PR etc.. a Lady in parliament brings influence. 

We have not exactly seen quorn sales go wild in the last year or two!?

 

Post edited at 21:38
NorthernGrit - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> But, in fact, she is Lady Nugee, and she maintains her Thornburry Maiden name to be down with the poor folk...

And you know this how? Actually "in fact" she is entitled to use the name Lady Nugee but chooses not to, which she is equally entitled to do. Perhaps she simply has no interest in using a title that is deferred to her because of her husband's position. This is not unusual. Her parentage, history and spouse are hardly a secret.

Incidentally what would be Boris's reason for not referring to himself at all times as Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson?

Ian W - on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to summo:

 

> We have not exactly seen quorn sales go wild in the last year or two!?

 

Have you seen their results recently? Not exactly poor performers.............

 

Graeme Alderson on 27 Mar 2018
In reply to Martin Hore:

Martin - don't feed the troll. Bigger/Stroppy(banned for being abusive)Gob is a well known WUM/Troll.

2
Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Timmd:

> But she has chosen to use her maiden name in politics, to differentiate herself from her husband. So, her being called X's wife, and Mrs Bugee, are, in this context I think, broadly comparable.

But is it "sexist" or just plain piss taking?

 

 

2
Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Martin Hore:

> I think you'll find that she became entitled to be called Lady Nugee when her husband received a knighthood. I think it's perfectly reasonable to decide not to use the title in those circumstances.

So do I. 

> The title makes neither her nor her husband any more aristocratic than Mo Farah or Bradley Wiggins.

Agreed

> As for choosing to keep your maiden name on marriage, that's perfectly acceptable I would have thought. To argue otherwise is surely sexist.

No problem with that.

It's my belief that Emily "white van man" Nugee/Thornburry has only chosen not to use her husband's name due to reverse snobbery, and that's what Boris was using against her.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-30139832

 

Post edited at 07:45
8
Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to NorthernGrit:

> Incidentally what would be Boris's reason for not referring to himself at all times as Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson?

The same reason that most of us use a forename and a surname, instead of our full name I should imagine.

Or is he being sexist?

 

4
Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Graeme Alderson:

> Martin - don't feed the troll. Bigger/Stroppy(banned for being abusive)Gob is a well known WUM/Troll.

Oh do stop whining like a spollied child Graeme, it's so demeaning and unattractive,

Try joining the debate instead, or is it beyond your limited capacities? 

Post edited at 07:50
12
Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

Thornberry resigned her Shadow Cabinet position on 20 November 2014, shortly after the polls closed in the Rochester and Strood by-election. Earlier in the day, she had received much criticism after tweeting a photograph of a house in the constituency adorned with three flags of St George and the owner's white van parked outside on the driveway, under the caption "Image from #Rochester", provoking accusations of snobbery.

She was widely criticised by fellow Labour Party MPs, including leader Ed Miliband who asserted her tweet conveyed a "sense of disrespect", Chris Bryant who said that it broke the "first rule of politics" and Simon Danczuk who suggested that the party had been "hijacked by the north London liberal elite"

In a September 2016 TV interview, whilst serving as shadow foreign minister, Thornberry was asked to name the French Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Development(Jean-Marc Ayrault). Thornberry confirmed that she was unable to name the minister, and accused the interviewer of "pub-quizzing" and sexism. Thornberry then asked to discuss the situation of North Korea, so the interviewer asked if she knew who the South Korean president was, but Thornberry did not know, saying that the interview was descending into a pub quiz. Female journalists and politicians, including Isabel Hardman and Ruth Davidson, quickly criticised Thornberry for using an allegation of sexism to cover her own poor performance. Thornberry then appeared on Radio 4 to say that the interview had been sexist because the interviewer had not asked such questions of a man because the interviewer assumed that a man would know the answer. However, the interviewer had previously asked a man, Alan Johnson, comparable factual questions. 

Thornberry has frequently campaigned for a greater commitment to affordable and social housing. She was criticised when the local Islington Tribune newspaper discovered that her husband had bought a former social house, which was being rented out to her aides

"Thornberry has lived in Islington since the early 1990s. In July 1991 she married fellow-barrister Sir Christopher Nugee, of Wilberforce Chambers, in Tower Hamlets, and they have two sons (born December 1991 and July 1999) and a daughter (born November 1993). Sir Christopher later became a Queen's Counsel, then a High Court Judge, when he was knighted, at which point Thornberry became entitled to be styled Lady Nugee, although she does not use the title. Since 1993 they have lived on Richmond Crescent, Barnsbury, where Tony Blair also lived until the 1997 general election, moving in on the same day as the Blairs.  Thornberry also part-owns properties in Guildford and South London. 

In April 2005, it emerged that Thornberry had sent her son to the partially selective Dame Alice Owen's state school 14 miles (23 km) away from her home and outside her constituency. The school was formerly based in Islington and still reserves ten per cent of its places for Islington pupils. The Labour Party opposes selection and Thornberry was widely criticised over the issue as a result. Chris Woodhead, the former chief inspector of schools said: "I celebrate her good sense as a parent and deplore her hypocrisy as a politician. When will those who espouse the virtues of comprehensive education apply the logic of their political message to their children?" Later, Thornberry's daughter also attended the school.

She's a perfect example of the hypocrisy which lies at the heart of the modern Labour party.

 

 

Post edited at 08:03
7
Greenbanks - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

I understand all that.  Don't think I can assimilate any lessons about hypocrisy from the Tories regarding lifestyles & pandering to the voting population...NHS & Brexit just recent examples.

My original point was not in any sense party political though. You have helped make it into that by wading in with a typically boorish comment about another (Opposition) politician and her lifestyle.   

BTW. You don't state a source for your lesson in morality.

3
MonkeyPuzzle - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

This is a fun game "In 2004 Woodhead became chairmain of Cognita, a company that owns and runs independent schools.[11] Woodhead and Cognita were reported in the press as having expelled pupils, and were accused of "milking profits", and dismissing a whistleblower who accused the company of allowing ineligible teachers to participate in the state run Teachers' Pension Scheme"

Anyway, did Thornberry's daughter take an entrance exam or was she taken because she lived in the catchment area? 

Post edited at 08:51
MonkeyPuzzle - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

> BTW. You don't state a source for your lesson in morality.

Wikipedia.

Pete Pozman - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Timmd:

> What about Yvette Cooper, what would her reason be for keeping her maiden name?

Ed had a good reply to a reporter who asked if he'd had problems with his schoolmates ribbing him  over his surname. Yes  he replied , but it was much worse for my sister Ophelia 

1
The New NickB - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

She was criticised by Simon Danczuk, I’m warming to her!

1
Stuart en Écosse - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> Oh do stop whining like a spollied child Graeme, it's so demeaning and unattractive,

> Try joining the debate instead, or is it beyond your limited capacities? 

Classy. 

1
Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

> I understand all that.  Don't think I can assimilate any lessons about hypocrisy from the Tories regarding lifestyles & pandering to the voting population...NHS & Brexit just recent examples.

"whataboutism"

> My original point was not in any sense party political though. You have helped make it into that by wading in with a typically boorish comment about another (Opposition) politician and her lifestyle.   

The discussion was about  Thornburry, wasn't it?

Where was I boorish? It helps if you quote what you are referring too,

> BTW. You don't state a source for your lesson in morality.

What "lesson in morality" It helps if you quorate what you are referring too.

Post edited at 10:04
9
Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Stuart en Écosse:

> Classy. 

Apt I thought, seeing as Graeme just waded in, insulted me, and added nothing to the debate.

I'll say it again, I do not insult unless insulted first.

6
MonkeyPuzzle - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> "whataboutism"

The topic was about the Speaker reprimanding Johnson for being sexist and you've brought up what school Emily Thornberry's daughter goes to.

1
EddInaBox on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> The discussion was about  Thornburry, wasn't it?

No, it was about Boris Johnson and how the Speaker reprimanded him for saying something that was out of order.  So I could list all the hypocritical things Boris has done in his polititcal and private life, and all the cock-ups he has perpetrated, and all the lies he has told, but I don't think the UKC servers have enough room.

 

Greenbanks - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

Boorish by missing the point - Johnson's sexism - and deflecting by 'whataboutery' yourself.

Morality = discussion regarding hypocrisy & what is & what isn't.

Anyway, got no time for the kind of dull willy-waving that you're into; thanks for diverting the thread.

 

1
johncoxmysteriously - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to summo:

> When she isn't actually slagging off white van drivers for having an England flag on their house. 

Which she didn’t do, of course. Just silly lies in the Tory media, which you choose to believe for some reason.

 

jcm

4
wercat on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

> The topic was about the Speaker reprimanding Johnson for being sexiest and you've brought up what school Emily Thornberry's daughter goes to.

golly again, amazing what difference a slight misreading makes

 

summo on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

> Which she didn’t do, of course. Just silly lies in the Tory media, which you choose to believe for some reason.

> jcm

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2014/nov/21/emily-thornberry-resignation-explain-outside-britain

johncoxmysteriously - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to summo:

Exactly - confirming precisely that she did nothing of the kind, but that dishonest folk like Cameron were able to pretend that she did.

 

jcm

4
summo on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

She tweeted and she acknowledged it. The guardian clearly isn't tory, but it still acknowledges she made those comments.

Even a most ardent Labour supporter has to admit; thornberry is a typical champagne socialist. 

Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

> The topic was about the Speaker reprimanding Johnson for being sexist and you've brought up what school Emily Thornberry's daughter goes to.

Yes, and I gave my reasons why I thought Bojo had used that line of attack. I then provided evidence for my assertion.

You should try it.

4
Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to EddInaBox:

> No, it was about Boris Johnson and how the Speaker reprimanded him for saying something that was out of order. 

So I showed why that line of attack may be effective.

> So I could list all the hypocritical things Boris has done in his polititcal and private life, and all the cock-ups he has perpetrated, and all the lies he has told, but I don't think the UKC servers have enough room.

You could, if that were somehow relevant to the debate.

 

Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Greenbanks:

> Boorish by missing the point - Johnson's sexism - and deflecting by 'whataboutery' yourself.

I denied it was "sexism" (though a reasonable reason why it could be perceived as such was later given,) and gave my reasons why I thought it so, how is that "boorish"?

> Morality = discussion regarding hypocrisy & what is & what isn't.

There was no discussion, and no attempt at relative morality, I just showed why  and how Thornburry is open to that sort of attack

> Anyway, got no time for the kind of dull willy-waving that you're into; thanks for diverting the thread.

LOL! That sentence, roughly translated, reads; "I've no answer to your points Big Ger."

 

Post edited at 14:22
2
Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

> Which she didn’t do, of course. Just silly lies in the Tory media, which you choose to believe for some reason.

So she resigned over "silly lies in the Tory media"?

Did Shadow Foreign Secretary Douglas Alexander lie when he said Labour leader Ed Miliband had "not held back" in expressing his dismay with the MP's actions?

"Anyone who wants to stand for election and be successful next May has to start with a fundamental and deep respect for voters," he told BBC Radio 4's Today.

"The anger Ed (Miliband) felt when he saw that tweet reflected his understanding that we need to earn the support of people around the country."

1
MonkeyPuzzle - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> Yes, and I gave my reasons why I thought Bojo had used that line of attack. I then provided evidence for my assertion.

Answering a question about the Commonwealth, you thought it a pertinent line of attack? Please explain its relevance; I can't quite grasp it.

 

Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

Can you point out where I said I thought it was a pertinent line of attack?

1
MonkeyPuzzle - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

So, you don't think it was pertinent? So, you... wait, what are you arguing? 

1
Big Ger - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

What I've argued all along, that this was just another piece of political infighting/banter, which due to the obsession with "sexism" of some, has been blown out of all proportion.

You'd swear Boris had punched her in the face....

4
MonkeyPuzzle - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> What I've argued all along, that this was just another piece of political infighting/banter, which due to the obsession with "sexism" of some, has been blown out of all proportion.

"...the noble and learned Lady Baroness whatever it is, I can’t remember what it is … Nugee" is a straightforward attempt to minimise the person in question and the effect, if not the intention (which we can never know), is at least mildly sexist to reduce someone to their husband's name and title, which they've expressly and pointedly not taken.

> You'd swear Boris had punched her in the face....

Or given her address out to a friend who was going to break her legs...

summo on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

Good job the Labour party and Thornberry have never used someone's social status(either upper or lower level) as a derogatory comment or in an attempt to be little someone in a debate. They can take the moral high ground here. 

Curiously, a female tory attempted to defend Boris and was shot down in an equally derogatory manner by the speaker, but this received little or no coverage. 

MonkeyPuzzle - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to summo:

> Good job the Labour party and Thornberry have never used someone's social status(either upper or lower level) as a derogatory comment or in an attempt to be little someone in a debate. They can take the moral high ground here. 

I wouldn't say "never", but I'm glad we agree on this issue.

> Curiously, a female tory attempted to defend Boris and was shot down in an equally derogatory manner by the speaker, but this received little or no coverage. 

Care to give it some with a link or a quote?

summo on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

> I wouldn't say "never", but I'm glad we agree on this issue.

> Care to give it some with a link or a quote?

https://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/boris-johnson-apologies-for-sexist-comment-in-commons-1-4713555

Towards the end. Guess you have to look at Hansard for the full extract as this is just part of it . Harriet baldwin is her name. 

Post edited at 16:45
MonkeyPuzzle - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to summo:

“I do not mean to be unkind to the Minister, and I know she won’t take it amiss, but the Foreign Secretary doesn’t need to be defended by her and I know she wouldn’t argue with the chair, she’d come off rather worse.”

What's derogatory about that exactly?

summo on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to MonkeyPuzzle:

>  I know she wouldn’t argue with the chair, she’d come off rather worse.”

> What's derogatory about that exactly?

You could infer that he some how considers himself superior. Just like boris's is about what it may or may not infer, not what it actually says. Both comments are matter of perspective.

It appears the whole thing is likely to be about bercow trying to look all pc because of previous allegations against him. 

3
FactorXXX - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to summo:

> It appears the whole thing is likely to be about bercow trying to look all pc because of previous allegations against him. 

Bercow probably had the tirade rehearsed after Theresa May used a similar 'Lady Nugee' tactic and was just waiting for someone to unleash it on.
He must have thought all his Christmases had come at once when he saw it was Boris... 
 

 

1
summo on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to FactorXXX:

> Bercow probably had the tirade rehearsed after Theresa May used a similar 'Lady Nugee' tactic and was just waiting for someone to unleash it on.He must have thought all his Christmases had come at once when he saw it was Boris... 

Exactly. Just biding his time. 

1
MonkeyPuzzle - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to summo:

> You could infer that he some how considers himself superior. Just like boris's is about what it may or may not infer, not what it actually says. Both comments are matter of perspective.

Could be: "The Speaker is the chief officer and highest authority of the House of Commons"

http://www.parliament.uk/business/commons/the-speaker/the-role-of-the-speaker/role-of-the-speaker/ 

> It appears the whole thing is likely to be about bercow trying to look all pc because of previous allegations against him. 

Or doing his job by not allowing name-calling, no matter how clever those doing it consider themselves to be.

johncoxmysteriously - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

 

I’m sure EM was angry. ET afforded the media and Tory spinners an obvious opportunity for dishonest but politically successful attacks. The fact remains that she obviously did not in fact slag off the gentleman whose house she photographed.

 

jcm

 

2
FactorXXX - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to johncoxmysteriously:

> I’m sure EM was angry. ET afforded the media and Tory spinners an obvious opportunity for dishonest but politically successful attacks. The fact remains that she obviously did not in fact slag off the gentleman whose house she photographed.

 

A picture paints a thousand words.
Maybe her intention was totally different, but most people seeing that photo would assume that the sender was essentially saying: "Look at all those English flags, must be a bit of a dodgy character living there - typical Rochester!".
Obviously, it doesn't mean the person living there is anything of the sort, but unfortunately, such use of English flags is now associated with a certain type of patriotism and that's why Thornberry was criticised for it.

 

aln - on 28 Mar 2018
In reply to Big Ger:

> It's my belief

Have you turned to religion? 

?


This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.