UKC

/ Isopon, heat, toxicity and other questions

This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.
Timmd on 17 May 2018

I have just repaired the blue lid on one of those Screwfix wallpaper steamers which cost £30 with some Isopon, because it's what I had to hand and it seemed like a good idea at the time, but since doing so I've started having second thoughts.

Does anybody on here know anything about how it might react as a material to the 100 degree temperature inside of the steamer, and whether it might give off anything toxic into the air or water? Presumably, if it did do, that would then remain in the room being steamed after one has finished? 

If I find reach no clear answer, I might just buy a new one.

Many thanks.

 

 

Post edited at 23:14
To be Frank on 17 May 2018
In reply to Timmd:

You're going to die ... http://www.isopon.com/files/11457/up5004-SDS-EN

Find the appropriate COSHH sheet for ever you are using for the full facts.

Timmd on 17 May 2018
In reply to Lusk:

I've just been looking at that, and it seems more sensible to throw it out after removing anything worth recycling (metal or electrical). Quite interesting reading, I didn't realise it was so toxic. Even if the repair did hold, it's not a nice material to have heating up and possibly giving off god knows what.

It'd be quite interesting to know what kind of material could be used for that kind of repair...

Post edited at 23:32
oldie - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Timmd:

Actually if its fully cured then steam at 100 deg C doesn't seem to be an extremely high temperature. If its meant for cars then it could probably exceed that temperature. I imagine the data sheet will often cover uncured material but obviously you'll need to check.

Also it will be a limited quantity and thus any gases produced are probably not at hazardous concentrations but its your decision. Ventilation while using the steamer would be a wise precaution.

jkarran - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Timmd:

> I have just repaired the blue lid on one of those Screwfix wallpaper steamers which cost £30 with some Isopon, because it's what I had to hand and it seemed like a good idea at the time, but since doing so I've started having second thoughts.

Body filler? Once it's cured it's pretty stable, most of the nasty volatiles come off before it's cured. I wouldn't worry about it unless I was working with it day in day out. Reinforced thermosetting resin seems like a sensible choice for repairing something like a steamer nozzle/diffusor so long as it bonds to the base material. 

I'd be more worried about fungicide in the paste which is to say not that worried.

jk

Toerag - on 18 May 2018
In reply to Timmd:

It's essentially fibreglass resin isn't it? Once cured there will be the following:-

a) a resin polymer which is going to be stable until it gets hot enough to break down and start catching fire

b) some unreacted monomer molecules

c) some solvent molecules

d) some filler material (glass powder, talc, titanium dioxide, colourings etc.).

Of all those things the solvent and monomers are the 'nasty' chemicals. The volume of isopon you've used to make the repair is pretty small, so I suspect the volumes of monomer and solvent will be so small they're not worth worrying about. I'm pretty certain you'd inhaled more of each when you mixed it up and applied it. If you're worried about it give it a good boil outside for an hour outside to give the solvents and monomers a chance to evaporate off before using it indoors. You'll never get rid of all the chemicals but you can get rid of most quite quickly.

Timmd on 18 May 2018
In reply to Toerag:

Thanks for the great reply, this is why UKC is so useful. 

Post edited at 15:43
Timmd on 22 May 2018
In reply to Toerag:

I noticed my lungs felt 'funny' when going to bed after fixing the steamer, but had cleared the next day. I opened the tub inside with the door open then hurried out with it. I was a little bit surprised at the brief effect I felt on my lungs, it set me thinking about 3rd world health and safety, to do with what people can inhale, and the importance of following the instructions on tubs of things.

Post edited at 21:18
jkarran - on 23 May 2018
In reply to Timmd:

> I noticed my lungs felt 'funny' when going to bed after fixing the steamer, but had cleared the next day. I opened the tub inside with the door open then hurried out with it. I was a little bit surprised at the brief effect I felt on my lungs, it set me thinking about 3rd world health and safety, to do with what people can inhale, and the importance of following the instructions on tubs of things.

Don't worry too much about it, it's a strong smell and doubtless no good for you in big doses or with chronic exposure but a few whiffs of it occasionally are unlikely to do you any harm. I was mending my fuselage the other day and was taken aback by how strong the styrene based filler smelled, I've used it quite a bit over the years but had completely forgotten the assault on the senses when you first open the tub. It's not just third world, all over Britain people work with stuff like this day in day out.

A mask with volatile organic filters isn't much if it worries you.

jk

Tricky Dicky - on 23 May 2018
In reply to jkarran:

>  I was mending my fuselage the other day

 

Half man - half plane!!!

 


This topic has been archived, and won't accept reply postings.